Will the I-Spy bill pass and become law?

I-Spy billI-Spy, with my little eye, a bill that — if passed — would sentence a person convicted of malicious spyware-related activities with up to five years in prison. The Internet Spyware Prevention Act (I-Spy) was proposed in mid-March by Reps. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) and Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.), and a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee recently approved the bill. However, it's still uncertain whether this antispyware bill will pass a Senate vote and actually become a law. Check out this CNET Networks' story for the specifics: "House tries again for antispyware bill."

Here's an excerpt from the article:

"Rather than attempting to define what illicit software is, the bill would make it a crime to copy computer code on a machine without authorization if doing so divulges 'personal information' about a user or 'impairs' a computer's security."

If the bill is approved by the full House Judiciary Committee, it will reach the full House for debate. I-Spy is already receiving support from large organizations, such as Microsoft, Dell, and Symantec, plus the Center for Democracy and Technology, and even online advertisers. Do you also stand behind this antispyware bill? Why or why not? Do you think I-Spy will be passed and become a law?


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Sonja Thompson started at TechRepublic in October 1999. She is a former Senior Editor at TechRepublic.

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