Microsoft

Windows Vista SP1 to focus on security and reliability

Microsoft is urging users and businesses waiting for the arrival of Windows Vista SP1 before moving to the new operating system not to do so.

Microsoft is urging home users and businesses waiting for the arrival of Windows Vista SP1 before moving to the new operating system not to do so.

Microsoft's Pete McKiernan, a senior product manager for Windows, told CNET News.com that Windows Vista SP1 will offer nothing more to the home user other than including all previously released patches into one package.

Excerpt from News.com:

What is included in the "upgrade"? McKiernan called out two features expected to be within Windows Vista SP1, neither is likely to excite consumers already on the fence about Windows Vista. One is an improvement to the BitLocker drive encryption system, available only in the Enterprise and Ultimate editions of Windows Vista. Under SP1, BitLocker will be able to encrypt multiple drive volumes; all drive volumes, that is, except for USB drives.

A second feature touted by Microsoft is support for emerging hardware and standards. Windows Vista SP1 will support Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI), Intel standard for the interface between software, the operating system and firmware, and Extended File Allocation Table (exFAT), a new Microsoft file system that may eliminate the need for defragmentation in the future.

Windows Vista SP1 won't include a new version of Internet Explorer or any new features that are considered must haves. Most of the enhancements within Windows Vista SP1 are under the hood and for enterprise customers. In short, Windows Vista SP1 lacks "wow."

The expected changes within Windows Vista SP1 can be categorized under security, reliability, and performance enhancements.

Take a look at the slide show on the installation process of Windows Vista SP1.

In wake of this information, will you upgrade your home machine to Windows Vista sooner?

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About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

44 comments
eddie_thomas2001
eddie_thomas2001

Yes I will upgrade to Vista SP1. Already upgraded to Vista, Yes it has some bugs in it but everyone gripped about windows XP when it came out too.

Adam S
Adam S

"...to focus on security and reliability" As opposed to...? What other things have service packs focused on? Really. I don't know. Sometimes they've slipped in 'goodies', like MovieMaker (and thank you for that), but was anything other than security and reliability ever the *focus* of a service pack? What was everyone expecting? I'm in the dark here. No, I think that people learned their lesson from XP not to jump in and be the guinea pigs. Some of us less adventurous with a full enough schedule will play it cool and stick with XP rather than try to be the tech heroes that solve all of Vista's problems before someone else.

Zaitoshi
Zaitoshi

I'm pretty sure most of you people here have been around to witness at least the launch of win 2k and xp. So if you were, this whole "Vista is teh ev1ls" crap will seem awfully familiar. Because at first, 2k had trouble running lots of stuff, drivers that didn't get released etc. After that XP had the same issues, and might I add that it too used resources like mad when it first hit the market in 2001. And now I am hearing the same old arguments again. Sure Vista is a resource hog for current day computers (or better said, computers older than aprox. 2 years), but give it some time, and I am very certain everyone will be running it. Mainly for either of two reasons: 1. Microsoft kills XP support, 2. The whole drivers don't work issue get solved. As soon as either scenario unfolds, I don't think anyone will be complaining. Or maybe I am just plain wrong, and you guys all still run win 98 SE. As for the home users, they don't care. 90% of all home users that want to downgrade are just scared by all the negative press Vista is getting, without even knowing what's so fundamentally flawed (just like many home users want XP Pro, even though it has absolutely NO added value). Before all the flaming broke out, people were excited to get Vista, cause it looked fancy and they could use it to make their neighbours and friends turn green with jealousy. And now all of the sudden nobody wants it? Get real, stop the MS flamewars and see for yourself. And just one last thing in regards to the driver blah-blah, I recently downgraded a new HP laptop from Vista back to XP, and it was a truely awfull situation. It turns out HP doesn't supply the XP drivers for that model, only Vista drivers. So, just carry on with the downgrading mumbo, I'll be the one saying "told ya so!" when the whole homeuser population starts complaining about why their brand new pc runs like crap on XP due to lack of drivers (most homeusers don't even know what a driver is to begin with). And as for me, I've been running Vista since release, and there is no way in hell I am switching back, I like the improved security, stability and (yes, guilty as charged...) eye-candy.

Oktet
Oktet

As soon as either scenario unfolds, I don't think anyone will be complaining. Or maybe I am just plain wrong, and you guys all still run win 98 SE. Yes, I am running Win98 on my little SOHO network and it runs superbly well. I also have Win XP, and a Vista Business Edition box; in addition to Linux. No problems here they all work fine if you are willing to learn.

Adam S
Adam S

Just because an OS stops being supported doesn't mean that it stops working. That is another misconception I believe that non-technical people have. "I read that Microsoft isn't going to be supporting XYZ anymore, so can I upgrade...?" Sigh. If XP works, then why fiddle with it? I was using W2K until last year, but only because I needed a new version of software that no longer ran on W2K. Until then, I had not owned a copy of XP. I'm not trying to be boastful or anti-anything, only to say that W2K worked for what I needed it to do for years, so there was no reason to upgrade. I still have it on the same computer and recently reinstalled it to clean out the junk. It works fantastically. On my 2Ghz P4 it opens windows without hesitation. I'm thinking I will go the same route with Vista; I won't upgrade to it until I really need to.

Adam S
Adam S

Perhaps you were just responding to my post because it was the last one and really you were addressing the audience as a whole. Never-the-less, I don't mind responding. You're hearing the same thing now as before and you recognize that trend. I couldn't agree more with the conclusion that most issues will be resolved in time. Soon, we will be laughing at ourselves for complaining that Vista needs 512MB or whatever when the next release needs twice that. Vista drivers will be common place and we'll be crossing our fingers when we go to look for an XP driver for that USB device. How silly we are for worrying about those trivial matters BEFORE we upgrade. Your paragraph about home users is completely anecdotal, so I'll disregard it. I haven't read through all of the comments, but I wasn't flaming Microsoft are anyone else. I was just commenting on the trends I saw as you were. My conclusion would have been the same as yours had I went that far. I'm sorry to hear about your downgrade woes. I take it you were downgrading for a reason...? I hope that it wasn't because Vista wasn't running something you needed. If so, I guess you're SOL either way, huh? Yes, everyone will upgrade to Vista EVENTUALLY. It is seemingly inevitable, given your two conditions. The question (which is not posed very well by the article we are commenting on) is, is NOW the right time to upgrade?

Adam S
Adam S

That makes perfect sense. It appears that you are dealing with a lot of uninformed customers over there. Good luck to you.

Zaitoshi
Zaitoshi

But, to give you some feedback on your remarks, let me explain a little further: The whole downgrade I had to do was because a customer of mine didn't want Vista permanent because everybody said it was a "bad choice of OS" not even knowing what he was actually talking about (being a simple homeuser (word and simple stuff like web browsing is all the does)). For some reason he clinged to the idea that Vista was evil and that I had to do the downgrade cause he refused to work with it, couldn't talk him out of it, even though his laptop now cost him much more. And about the whole home user remark being anecdotal, I am not so sure. The first couple of months after release we've sold huge amounts of Vista licences, and nobody complained for months until I now see them return to ask for a downgrade (of their self installed upgrade, yes), because they hear Vista is flawed. In response to my question what their main problem with Vista is, many fail to come up with any logical answer, or even fail to make sense at all. And as for business users, that, I can understand. I know you don't want to deploy something that may contain some error with some obscure piece of software which didn't turn up during testing. Understandable, and logical. But imho my point stays valid that 90% of the homeusers complaining have no idea what they are talking ab out, other than "ghost-stories".

chris_thamm
chris_thamm

If in fact, SP1 addresses both security and reliability problems -- both of which exist in staggering numbers in Vista -- I may actually be able to recommend that my clients *consider* Vista for home. My clients have experienced way too many problems with Vista to use the word, "acceptable," to describe it, and Microsoft has been abysmally slow at fixing them. I hate to say it, but my peers who said, "wait until SP1," were right all along.

yagar
yagar

I will put myself as the home user. I have an XP machine that is doing everything I need it to do. It runs the software I use. The drivers all work just fine. My computer is snappy, responding quickly to my never ending clicks of the mouse. I'm basically, a happy camper. You have just told me there will be no improvements for me if I upgrade to Vista now or if I wait for SP1. So what should I do. Let me think here, it's a tough one..... Why would you even think I would consider upgrading. I could run into a problem with a driver, so maybe the printer I own becomes useless, so I need to buy another. That favorite software I use could no long work. I have to find and purchase another that probably won't do exactly what I want it to do, and I'll have to learn how it works. Importantly, now when I click on the mouse I have to wait for Vista to respond. I have to spend the exaggerated price for Vista and I now have to throw in another gig of ram to see if this snail I am now operating will actually move any faster. Lets add to that the possible cost of a printer and software. Lots of $$$ and for what benefit exactly did I do this for. The fireworks for the announcement of Vista are over. Those that just have to have every new toy that comes around have already done it. The Vista process is in the show me stage. Show me you can be better for me. Show me how the money I'm going to spend on you is going to be paid back to me. If you can't show me, then why should I spend my time and money on you.

wolf13
wolf13

I think they should put all the halo 3 people on developing the next generation of Windows, work on some reality instead of the games

richard.wilson
richard.wilson

Just a few years ago.... I will put myself as the home user. I have a Windows 2000 machine that is doing everything I need it to do. It runs the software I use. The drivers all work just fine. My computer is snappy, responding quickly to my never ending clicks of the mouse. I'm basically, a happy camper. You have just told me there will be no improvements for me if I upgrade to Windows XP now or if I wait for SP1. So what should I do. Let me think here, it's a tough one..... Why would you even think I would consider upgrading. I could run into a problem with a driver, so maybe the printer I own becomes useless, so I need to buy another. That favorite software I use could no long work. I have to find and purchase another that probably won't do exactly what I want it to do, and I'll have to learn how it works. Importantly, now when I click on the mouse I have to wait for XP to respond. I have to spend the exaggerated price for XP and I now have to throw in another gig of ram to see if this snail I am now operating will actually move any faster. Lets add to that the possible cost of a printer and software. Lots of $$$ and for what benefit exactly did I do this for. The fireworks for the announcement of XP are over. Those that just have to have every new toy that comes around have already done it. The XP process is in the show me stage. Show me you can be better for me. Show me how the money I'm going to spend on you is going to be paid back to me. If you can't show me, then why should I spend my time and money on you. Why would you upgrade? As an IT consultant, you should know that sooner or later, many companies are going to make a move to Vista, just like they moved and still are moving to XP. If you do the "sit back and ignore the new stuff because mine is working fine right now", you become the worst thing in IT, Obsolete! Upgrade and learn the new technology. There were lots of IT "gurus" that did not want to upgrade to XP or even 2000. You know where they are now? Looking for jobs and wondering why their MCSE in NT isn't getting more looks than it is. To stay on the "cutting edge", you need to stay up on the latest technology, even if you don't like it. Do you really think just because you don't like Vista, that is going to influence the rest of the IT world? I think not. If you do, get used to hearing this: "Do you have any experience with Vista?" "No, I don't because I don't like it." "Thanks. We'll keep you in mind." (as they file away your resume and forget about it) I'm saying this to shed some light on all IT people and all IT hopefuls out there. Don't be swayed by what you read or what you hear. The best IT people research for themselves and make their own decisions. I'm not saying you should use it on your only box at home. Get a test machine and play with it. Install it as a virtual machine. Whatever you do, don't ignore it hoping that it goes away. That just leaves you in the dark.

Oktet
Oktet

That's why I keep my Vista Box on standby. Even though I barely toy with it (pretty much gathering dust), while loving linux and XP. When someone says something about Vista, I have the lab setup: lets have some fun and experiment the validity of their truth(s).

yagar
yagar

This isn't about an IT consultant dealing with a business, it's about the home user spending money to upgrade to Vista. Do I recommend home users to upgrade, no. Will they get it on the next machine they buy probably. Then they may have to deal with some of what I said but then, not now, and it doesn't cost them anything. Consider this. I still have a major business for this area, that runs it's point of sale from a DOS based program they have used for years. It has worked fine for them and will continue to do so. I have hardware set aside for them that will replace their well aged equipment when it is needed. I still home users running 98, because it does everything they need to do. So here what I think does effect the IT world I'm in, and I really don't care about the IT world out there, I'm not going there. I'm well aware of the path Vista will take, I've seen it every since Windows 3.0. I've listen to more of the "cutting edge" crap that I care to remember. I still really don't like XP, but at this point it's a far better option for the Home User, than Vista. The home user that could care less about being on the cutting edge.

amj2010
amj2010

Dear Editor, We have experienced a rather tricky situation, when we had saved certain docs under c:\username\documents The following morning my daughter looked for the docs but to her dismay they were gone... So what to do? Frst we went to the properties on the folder documents and saw in the menu: Previous versions... Previous versions?????? We clicked on that and saw numerous folders of today and yesterday with the name Documents. Below we saw that you could even open them to look what they contain and so we did... And voila, there they were, my daughter happy that she could use her resum?? again to sollicitate for a job. So we copied them to another drive and location, to secure them. BE WARNED, never to leave your precious files alone and have moved to a SAVE place. So, another nail? I don't know, you tell me. a worried man. amj2007 from flanders.

paulmah
paulmah

Would you upgrade your home machine to Windows Vista sooner?

regev99
regev99

Since last Juanuary :)

Paul R.A.
Paul R.A.

I am not even sure if my Company will go ahead next year now or wait until XP is really buried. As for me- nah, I still see a Beta product with performance issues, it's better than when I tested, but still not ready for prime time

Dennis.Keeling
Dennis.Keeling

Vista - No, I'me upgrading to an iMac24. Since I've not had a stable computer since the late 80s.

tigua
tigua

Will probably buy a new PC with XP pro installed before they stop offering them. Am running a P3V4X mother board with a 1.4 gig Sloket and this PC works great most of the time. XP pro works just fine. All my old hardware works fine also. All my software works too.

bradford.smithiii
bradford.smithiii

Vista is a big pain as far as I can see. Driver incompatibility and hardware hunger together with network incompatibility with XP machines make it something to avoid.

allanolinares
allanolinares

i had vista on my pc for about a month now and could see no real, big change from windows xp.. except maybe the longer boot time.

Oktet
Oktet

My Vista Business Edition Box, that is dual booting Windows XP (courtesy of MSDNAA)is sitting right next to my Linux Box and have no problems so far, especially with SP1 for Vista:since I never turn my Vista Box on- the experience is enlightening.

glennbabbitt
glennbabbitt

I am still seeing NO reason to upgrade to Vista when I can do all the same stuff on either an XP or Linux box using 1/4 of the hardware resources that Vista wants to gobble up.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

I personally hope to avoid Vista on my personal machines forever. Or until I die - whichever comes first.

tesseract7
tesseract7

Considering that Microsoft is (allegedly) one of the foremost software companies in the world, the need to conduct post-release public beta testing to fine-tune the software should not be allowed to occur. Basically, if it isn't right, then don't release it. My decision to wait till SP2 has a rider - if it still ain't right I still wont use it - and I won't advise my clients to use it either. We all know XP and how it works, so why "upgrade" to something which IMHO is not sufficiently mature.

armstrongb
armstrongb

I have a 5+ year P4 that runs XP Pro and a bunch of apps very well. The system would need significant dollars to be invested for memory and certain device upgrades to be fully compatible with Vista. However, I have an Apple box, a Linux and now I got a brand new Vista box. I like all computers and operating systems, some more than others. Windows support has buttered my bread for over 15 years. As of today, there's nothing I can do on Vista that I can't do on Apple or XP. In fact, the apps for the Apple and XP are well designed, refined and work to expectation. Very few apps that I use can make the crossing from XP to Vista without buying some sort of upgrade, if it exists yet. So my question to those who ask me about buying a new system is the same as always. What new functionality or applications will you use on this new operating system? If they don't know then I ask them if they like to spend money for the heck of it? Do they want to be on the bleeding edge because they can afford it? Will Vista be a success? Beats me, it uses a lot more resources and there appears to be no killer app on the horizon. A solution in search of a problem to solve is Vista. Aero sure is shiny though... Peace.

carlsf
carlsf

Sorry MS after testing VISTA and Office 2007, there is NO way my business or my clients will be going the VISTA way. We NOW have a good business downgrading VISTA computers to XP PRO/Home. Our clients agree after the downgrade thins run smoother and faster, also the ease of use (NOT HAVING TO LEARN A NEW WAY). Most users DONT have the time or resources to retrain staff or themselves, they just want to earn a living and VISTA/OFFICE 2007 make their business unproductive.

tgueth
tgueth

Look, there is no new significant functionality provided by Vista. In the long run (by end of 2008), I expect to move to Vista. But for now, too many issues that reduce productivity rather than improve it. For business users, if Microsoft had simply added a setup option - run like XP - it is highly likely that more people would make the move. The transition is hard to Vista for general users. I do not fault Microsoft for Vista and the UAC concept as it is needed in the long run, but unfortunately they are dragged down by legacy code, including their own. Users want to run their existing code without interruptions or special setups, so they will trade some security for productivity. You would think that Microsoft would have learned from the Win2K issues (office 2000 for example) for people migrating from Win98.

wolf13
wolf13

I think the best advice is to wait for the next OS, Hopefully wont take as long as Vista did bacause I believe it is a bust,just like ME was, no matter how you juggle the books. Oh, and yes still learn the system but as for my everyday use not a chance, as of this moment.

seabird23
seabird23

I already have Vista Business upgrade, but will be sticking to my XP Pro, I`m to scared to put it on because there is not enough support for it yet. By that I mean drivers and the such like. With me it`s a no no, SP1 or not.

K-JAC
K-JAC

Why should or would anyone? So far there is no proven personal or business benefit. There will eventually come a time when support for our current hardware and applications will force us to take the move. Microsoft would need to have power and sway over the hardware and software development communities and totally disregard common sense and their customer's true needs to pull it off. What's that?....they do already??! Damn! (never mind)

stan
stan

Long answer: No. I can't see any reason to upgrade, and several reasons not to.

Mishap
Mishap

No! Why should I throw out my investment in existing hardware and software just to make MS happy? Why should I be on the bleeding edge with a system that has no advantage to me as a user? I've seen nothing that Vista does that has value that is missing from XP. And XP is more stable! My investment in computers currently means that I CAN'T updarade, as I, like most, can not afford to replace all the systems and software that I have. Every MS release makes me more certain that Linux is the way to go! It runs on ALL my existing hardware, and old software continues to run on new versions. If the volunteer, Open Source community can keep old stuff working and useful, why can't MS? Larrr T.

cheerios2512
cheerios2512

Well. No to upgrade to Vista. Been supporting quite a numbers of notebooks and workstations with Vista and it is really pain in the butt. Yes and I am encouraging quite a number of users to turn to Linux and still use their existing hardware. Performance wise is good and they still get their emails, type letters, doing up their spreadsheets, listen to MP3s and videos. All thanks to the commendable Open Community for supporting Linux. I am also using Linux and only uses Windows as secondary option. Best of all, there are loads of software for the Linux users coming up and I don't mind supporting them by donating to the development of more software for all. Cheerios2512

clwyattjr
clwyattjr

For most people, in my opinion, there is no reason to upgrade to Vista until they need to replace a system. Most older computers do not have the hardware required to run the "fun" part of Vista anyway, so why upgrade? I have been working with Vista for several months on a laptop I ordered after Vista released and see no real advantage for anyone to upgrade other than being able to say the have Vista. Lot's of software that people use will not (and never will) work on Vista unless the upgrade to a newer version (i.e. Quickbooks - only 2007 will work). With the price of computers droping all the time, I am advising my customers to wait till they need to replace the machine.

zen71001
zen71001

No I would not "upgrade" my home machine to Vista because its a MAC! ;-) No chance I will use Vista because I have see too many home and corporate users struggling with drivers and problems of all sorts. The real crunch came when an unemployed friend of mine was forced to buy a new printer for no better reason that no Vista drivers will be made available for her perfectly serviceable old printer. My advice buy a Mac they just work!

kknepple
kknepple

http://www.informationweek.com/hardware/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=202300121 Mac has been having some issues. I have been incorporating Macs at our workplace and have found that there are a number of drawbacks. The amount of software to choose from for business applications is very limited. You are also very limited when it comes to purchasing laptops and they are very expensive. It is either a Macbook or a Macbook Pro. I find it interesting that Bootcamp will be included in the next Mac O/S. Apple realizes that when you are playing around you can be on the Mac side, and when you need to work you can be on the Mic side. So really Apple just plays, not works. I also found it interesting that Mac pulled their O/S developers to help develop the iPhone. Apple is smart and they know what their best markets are and that is ipods, iphones, and AppleTV's and not computers. Vista is not perfect but it has been very stable here at work. Even though it is not compatable with everything. It is still compatable with more applications and hardware then anything Mac has to offer. Compatability has not been an obstacle for me anyways. Apple for dorm rooms. Microsoft to make money.

david
david

Frankly I don't think it's going to make any difference to home users. I have be using Vista Ultimate now for the last 6 months and I haven't had much trouble with it from a functionality point of view,writting code, sending emails and doing normal day to day functions are fine, from a performance point of view doe, in comparison to XP,Vista eats up RAM and processor power constantly and having Vista only compatible with only DirectX 10 makes this OS a big no no for gamers if you want to play DirectX 9 games as the backward compatibility is extremely below what it should be...(Had to install XP for games) But in a few months, I don't think home users will a have a choice with Microsoft not selling XP anymore.

michael.jordan
michael.jordan

I admit that I have only used Vista a little but this will not influence me to upgrade. Price, performance, ease of use and compatability will all make me wait.

Open Minded Geek
Open Minded Geek

No ... think MS have created a bit of an own goal with Vista ... reminds me of another of their products ... Millenium Edition. Just watching at the moment to see if Vista goes the same way ... especially as Vienna is reportedly coming out in 2010 ... moving to Vista would therefore just be a waste of time, effort and money!!

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