Security

Infographic: 2012, the year of password theft

This infographic breaks out the numbers of password theft exploits so far in 2012. Help your users understand the risks of bad password management.

Password theft is an ongoing problem, and large-scale thefts like that of LinkedIn this year continues to shine a spotlight on the risks of having your passwords compromised -- time after time. The infographic below, courtesy of Security Coverage, breaks down the numbers for 2012 (so far). Are you using a password manager or recommending one to your organization's users? This infographic might help them understand the risk they face.

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Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

13 comments
maryjones115
maryjones115

Companies like LinkedIn, Zappos and eHarmony could not protect their users' data. This is a clear signal which tells us that just passwords are not enough anymore. We need to use additional identity authentication mechanisms to protect user identity. There is a company I know of called "TeleSign" which provide good Identity Authentication solutions. See their website: http://www.telesign.com

JCitizen
JCitizen

I'll stick with Last Pass and Keyscrambler for now. :|

Regulus
Regulus

'Editorial Integrity' anyone? After making my comments concerning the size of the graphic, I went back (motivated by other comments - thank you) and re-read the article. Yes, it does appear that the author is using Republican Mathematics. Also, it does appear to be no more than just another advertisement. EDITOR: Can we legitimately assume that this company paid the going rate for this size ad and subterfuge? If not, you got took for a ride also.

Regulus
Regulus

These 'Infographics' are great for displaying information. Most of them, this one included, have one VERY MAJOR ISSUE. That is, that they cannot be printed out on a single piece of paper and remain legible except through a microscope. Even downloading the .jpg results in a graphic that when enlarged to readable size, took 6 screen heights (on my 24" screen) to display the entire figure. Let's get back to reality and create something that can be printed on 8 X 10.5 (for the US) and/or A-4 (for the rest of the world). Thank You.

mmorenberg
mmorenberg

Wow, that advertisement makes this whole infographic suspect. Only 500 downloads on google play and many of them coming from an HTC Wildfire S - hmmm? I won't be using this app to store my sensitive data.

phoog
phoog

Going from 9.5 to 12 is a 30 % increase, not a 300 % increase.

martin
martin

It's just text over smartphone silhouettes. An infographic should provide a visual representation of information.

RudHud
RudHud

Built up to quite the sales pitch there. My wife says it reminds her of the scene in "Lady and the Tramp" where the Tramp sells a dog muzzle to a beaver as a log moving device. "It'll increase your efficiency by sixty-six percent." "Shixty Shix pershent!" says the beaver. "That is shomtin!" [From memory]

i_tiberius
i_tiberius

the infographic (cough, Advertisement) was just too purrdy...

dmritchie2
dmritchie2

You got me, I wasn't expecting an advertisement.

Mr. Fix
Mr. Fix

BTW, the quote - variously attributed to Mark Twain, Charles H. Grosvenor, James G. Blaine, and Carroll D. Wright - actually traces to an 1884 North Dakota newspaper article about successful and unsuccessful merchants, presented as an anonymous piece of wisdom. Times and technology have changed dramatically since 1884 but evidently marketing ethics remain stuck in the 19th-century.

rhys
rhys

That ad is fear mongering with truly useless info. 300% increase uses some dubious mathematics. The research is no better: how the author decided the 9.5 million came from Q1 2010 I don't know given the source says "The figures dwarf the credit agency's data for last year, which totaled 9.5 million.". By my reckoning last year was 2011 (article written July 18, 2012). 67% increase in data breaches in general since 2010. What does in general mean here? What is the source? 33% more likely than whom? Or are they 33% more likely to be victims rather than perpetrators? There is too much missing information. More than 60% of people use the same password across multiple sites. While this may be entirely true what has this got to do with me? This statistic has no bearing on my security, only on the security of accounts where passwords are common. 63% of smartphone users do not use password protection. What are they not protectign with passwords? If the object unprotected is the smartphone, then so far as I know 100% of smartphone users have password protection available. 32% of smartphone users save login infromation directly to their device. Again what is the relevance to me? Is your aim to make that 100% with your app? I am interested to hear that the group of internet users who are not on Google+, or Twitter, or Facebook, or LinkedIn have the lowest incidence of fraud. What sort of person is not on these services and why is their rate lower? Think about that and see if you think this is causal or correlated for other reasons. I have less respect for Password Genie having seen that ad. If you let marketing types write in stats, please make sure the stats are useful, or failing that at least correct.

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