Security

Microsoft announces security bulletin changes


A Microsoft spokesperson just notified me of planned changes to both the advanced notification service (ANS) and format of the monthly scheduled Microsoft security bulletins. These changes are worthy of note, but they will not affect the actual information provided -- just the way it is presented.

According to the spokesperson, the changes are intended mostly to make it easier for security managers to deterimine the actual threat level for their particular situation. The new ANS will be implemented Thursday, June 7, and it will include the maximum severity rating, the impact, a list of affected software, and other details about the threat.

As listed on the TechNet blog, Microsoft plans to make the security bulletins more immediately useful by:

  • Moving all applicable decision-making information to the top of the page.
  • Creating a table of affected products (instead of a list) with links to the download location of the updates.
  • Changing the section titles to be more representative of the content under them.
  • Rearranging content to areas that make them more intuitive to find.
  • Reducing some of the repetitive content in the bulletin.

Here's an example of the new layout, which shows a rewrite of Microsoft Security Bulletin MS07-016. Please note that this example does not contain any new information and is merely a demonstration of the new format.

At first glance I find the new format to be an improvement. Please let me know here what you think, and I will pass along any suggestions to my contacts at Microsoft.

4 comments
BALTHOR
BALTHOR

If I had to worry about the pizza oven in my restaurant working correctly how could I maintain a business?I would call in the oven repair person and the oven would be fixed.With computers this is not so.Computers never get fixed,they always run poorly!

donaldcoe
donaldcoe

In all things electronic, those little electrons do what you tell them. As with computers the machine language (routines) were designed of the ages to tell the computer what to do, when to do it, how to do it, how fast to do, or don't do it at this time. Everything is subject to break due to the lack of care and maintenance, as you might think I am a maintenance tech, I find a little more memory, reorganizing that ever increasing data workload with simple program built in to Windows called defrag, chkdsk, or whatevers use of these can have the cat jumping from a hot tin roof plenty quick. No one ever has time for daily maintenance until it's broke. Please do not blame the computer for it's lack of direction it's just awaiting your command(s).

Tech Locksmith
Tech Locksmith

On the other hand, I personally make my own pizza from scratch and, although they are not always perfect, we very seldom need to throw one to the dogs. I don?t even use a recipe. But a pizza oven only has to do one thing - provide controlled heat. I once built a computer from scratch ? it involved physical relays and big X and O panels. It worked fine too till a relay burned out. That computer only played a game. I haven?t tried designing a CPU from scratch or writing 12 million lines of code to get it to do hundreds of thousands of things. The more complex something is, the harder it is to keep it running perfectly. If you compare a computer to the space shuttle (for the number of interacting components) instead of a pizza oven (controlled heat is the only factor), then you might feel as I do that PCs work pretty well ? mine run for years without any major problem. Add to that the fact that people make computers/software and computer problems are always the fault of those people and you may come to believe that today's PCs are actually remarkable tools. My main argument with them is what people use them for (such as creating malware).

gshollingsworth
gshollingsworth

I think the order of the information is an improvement. I see many links to go back to the top of the section and top of the page. Links down to sections might be helpful. Some of the detail should be collapsed on initial view, too much detail. I do not mind clicking a plus sign to show needed detail.