Linux

10 Ubuntu re-spins I'd like to see

Jack Wallen let's his imagination go wild and creates some Ubuntu-based distributions that could have real world applications. Along the way, he creates some just for fun. Let us know which ones YOU would like to see.

In the Linux-verse, a re-spin is basically a new distribution that has been "spun off" from another distribution. We've already seen the likes of this with just about every major distribution. Ubuntu is one of the distributions that has enjoyed a number of good re-spins. Based on what is going down with the current releases of Ubuntu, this favorite distribution of new users will be in need of a few newer re-spins.

With that in mind, I thought it would be a fun exercise to come up with a few re-spins of my own that would combine various bits and pieces (and a few philosophies) from other operating systems or developers. Some of these distributions would be quite possible, whereas some may not. I'll leave it up to you which of them should actually happen.

#1 Enlibuntu

Enlightenment E17 and Ubuntu. We have already seen OpenGeu pretty much come and go. The last update to this version of Ubuntu was 9.10 and no one wants to go backwards. Another attempt at combining one of the best Linux desktops with Ubunt was Elbuntu (which was completely abandoned.) With the state of the GNOME desktop on Ubuntu undergoing some major changes, a desktop that offers a seriously equal flexibility to usability ratio is in need.The perfect desktop for that is Enlightenment E17. Although there is already a very good take on this using Debian (Elive), it does not enjoy the latest, greatest such that the combination of Ubuntu and E17 could enjoy. Plus, having Ubuntuone on E17 is a definite win-win.

#2 Tabuntu

An Ubuntu re-spin dedicated completely to tablet PCs. This distribution would focus completely on the touchscreen and hardware dedicated to tablets, allowing the owner of any of the current crop of tablets (minus the iPad of course) to install a touch-ready flavor of Ubuntu. Although it seems like Ubuntu on the tablet is very Unity-centric, I would like to see an alternative desktop or just go straight for GNOME 3.

#3 Winbuntu

I know this is going to sound a bit odd, but I would like to see someone create a re-spin of Ubuntu that looks and feels exactly like Windows 7. With this re-spin new users would think they are using Windows, but in fact would not be. This would be a great way to covertly get Linux on more and more machines. And imagine what joy you would receive hearing the target proclaim how much better their PC is running now that you "fixed" it.

#4 Macbuntu

Same thing as Winbuntu, only mimicking the look and feel of OS X. This, of course, would have to work on Apple hardware, but it would be sweet to have a pseudo-Mac clone that offered the flexibility of Linux.

#5 Gamebuntu

This distribution would have one purpose and one purpose only - be the Swiss Army Knife of game consoles. I would pack every console emulator available into this spin as well as Cedega (for playing Windows games) and standard WINE. The hardware requirements would have to be sky high in order to make sure anyone that loads up this spin would have absolutely nothing to complain about and all of their games would work.

#6 Sportsbuntu

I want a Linux distribution dedicated to every crazed sports fan out there. This re-spin would have tools to help fans keep track of their fantasy and reality teams as well as offer themes for nearly every team available. You could re-spin this into NASBuntu, NFLbuntu (although you might have to skip 11.04 and wait for 12.04 to make this useful), NBAbuntu, MLBuntu, NCAABuntu, BASSbuntu, and more.

#7 Artsbuntu

Keeping up with the Sports nut, a distribution focused on the arts would be nice. This re-spin would include every possible tool for the aspiring artist (including performance and non-performance arts) as well as applets that connect to Art-based Wikis. The multimedia player would specialize in show tunes and connect to Hulu to play every season of Glee and Fame.

#8 Writebuntu

An Ubuntu specifically for writers. This re-spin would include Writer's Cafe, Basket Notes, a full-screen text editor, LibreOffice, The GIMP (for creating covers for their books), Calibre (for managing books), OpenShot Video Editor (for creating promo videos), and a local Wiki that included how-tos on self-publishing as well as names and contact information for every publisher and agent in the country. Also included with this spin would be timers, dictionaries, thesauruses, and every possible recipe for coffee imaginable.

#9 Bizbuntu

Imagine an Ubuntu respin targeted specifically for small to medium size businesses. This take on Linux could not only include tools to help integrate Ubuntu into a Windows environment, but also include tools necessary to run a business. This re-spin could include GnuCash, Lemon POS, HRM tools, CRM tools, and more. Also, this version would require the encryption of the /home partition, and have strict password policies in place for all passwords used on the system.

#10 Devbuntu

Simply put, a distribution of Ubuntu made specifically for developers. This respin would include solid IDE's, every necessary command line tool for building C and C++ applications, Bluefish, vim, website development tools, OpenJDK, as well as tools for building Android and even iPhone apps. This particular distribution might be one of the larger installations known to the Linuxverse, but it's application would be incredible.

What about you? Have you ever thought of a Ubuntu re-spin that would make your life easier? Is there a Linux distribution you really need, but doesn't exist? Let's all get creative and come up with Linux flavors no one has seen, but some could use.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

76 comments
LeonBA
LeonBA

How about a respin centered on graphical-artist types? People who get creative with photo and video editing, and creating computer-art content? My other idea is a little more fanciful, and would probably be better done as a downloadable package in the repository: an LCARS environment, for all those crazy Star Trek fans out there.

thinw002
thinw002

My opinion is that these features would be better suited to a download bundle (i.e. apt-get sportspack). Leave the fundamentals upto the experts and allow anyone to enjoy without having to re-install the operating system.

aikiwolfie
aikiwolfie

This would just cause confusion and annoy people when Windows software didn't work properly. Some folks at a tech show or some such did pull a prank on Bill Gates once. They dressed a Gnome desktop to look and behave like Windows XP. Bill Gates was drawn in hook, line and sinker. But seriously do we really need to hide Linux to make it successful? Do we really need to con people in this way? I don't think we do. Most people who used Gnome or KDE get to grips with either desktop very quickly. Especially if they're not yet trained in the Microsoft or Apple way of doing things. Microsoft is a sinking ship and Apple's products are too expensive and starting to fray at the seems. For the second time running the iOS failed to handle day light saving time properly. Why hadn't Apple got around to getting that fixed? It's such a simple feature that consumers simply expect to be there and "just work". As for Microsoft? WP7 is a dead duck. Handset makers and network operators are showing a clear preference for Android. A Linux based OS with it's own unique touch screen centric GUI. Which is now moving into the tablet space and giving Apple a run for it's money as well as making Microsoft's tablet efforts look distinctly late 1990s. Lets not imitate failure to innovate.

toyotadyna
toyotadyna

I'd like to see a version of Ubuntu that will detect and use an onboard ethernet adaptor. Most motherboards have them now and it's a nuisance to have to fit a PCI NIC, as advised Ubuntu publishers. Last time I tried Ubuntu I did an extensive search for drivers only to be advised that drivers were not available and to to fit a PCI NIC.

Tank997
Tank997

Add a database like Firebird or MySQL and an MRP/ inventory management package and I'm in...

nubnub123
nubnub123

I think Pornbuntu is the only spinoff that would actually attract a large enough userbase to warrant the effort.

dick.helander
dick.helander

if ubunto/linux should have a program. like. DJmusic. it should get a lot off music fans. to use linux.

poultrygeist
poultrygeist

I would like to see a Health Care Distro

Hazydave
Hazydave

Is not really a distro. Maybe a kind of overlay to an existing distro... you'd install Ubuntu, then fire up your Windows-alike, or network tools overlay, etc. Each overlay would coordinate the installation of applications, libraries, UI tweaks, whatever... without the overhead of a full distro. And, in theory at least, very reversible. I think in general, enough with distro narrowcasting. But I'd welcome some kind of environment overlay or metapackage or whatver you want to call it. If done correctly, at least.

emenau
emenau

3D Ubuntu rock solid quick and more userfriendly then ACAD? Does it exist?

rindi1
rindi1

And PCOS is based on Ubuntu LTS meant for business (Bizbuntu)

Alpha_Dog
Alpha_Dog

Enlibuntu: not so much. While awesome in it's graphics prowess and tidy code, little has been done to make the configs easy to use like gnome (which could use more work in this department). If you want everyone to use it, anyone should be able to do so, even people who can't use a calculator. Tabuntu: Awesome call. I've got it running on a Panasonic Toughbook with a touch screen, and it could be a real show stopper with some minor usability tweaks. The main difference is that you can operate a Tabuntu system to do literally anything you do with a tablet or PC. You can't really say that about Android (yet). Winbuntu: Nope, sorry. The learning curve isn't that hard and the risk of being sued outweighs the benefits. Same goes for Macbuntu. Sorry guys. Gamebuntu: I like the idea in principle. Perhaps we need a distro that can take a PC equipped with a set range of hardware and turn it into a game machine... after all, isn't that what Microsoft did with the X-Box? Sportsbuntu: Sorry, I don't see this one. Other than change wallpaper and screen metrics to team graphics and colors (you know who you are), sports fan's use of a computer isn't that different. Artsbuntu: Here you may have hit upon something. The artist counter-culture is not only poor(ish), it is also anti-establishment. I have to admit that the thought of artists supporting Adobe and Microsoft doesn't sit well with my artist friends, so they run screaming into Apple's waiting arms and run Adobe. Ubuntu would give them a real choice with good tools. Writebuntu: In many ways this would combine well with Artsbuntu to create a solid package. Don't forget Scribus for industrial desktop publishing, Inkscape for vector graphics which make sign making a snap. Bizbuntu: While this has the most potential, I'm not sure how we can make Ubuntu more business friendly with the exception of a marketing angle. Oh wait... we don't really market do we? Perhaps that is what we should respin, but I digress... Devbuntu: Absolutely, but how is that different form what is already in place? Why cater to developers when they are technically savvy and will customize the installation to their liking anyway? Good thought, but limited application. This limits it to a combination of Artsbuntu and Writerbuntu which would bear a striking resemblence to Medibuntu, Tabuntu which would look and feel much like the Netbook remix, Gamebuntu where innovation is needed, and Bizbuntu which would need a box and manual (that nobody reads) to finance an ad campaign specifically geared to appeal to frightened luddite bosses.

majortomgb
majortomgb

Let's make a respin on a different distro say PCLinuxOS

thomas.gossard
thomas.gossard

I would like to see a distribution that has many if not all the network tools installed, such as Nagois. This would be very helpful for those of us in large networks to make building a monitoring system much easier.

stephenmark1
stephenmark1

I think that UBUNTU is very nearly working like Windows now; with the exception of drivers for proprietary software. It would be interesting to have one dedicated to writing, essays novels etc. Let me put it to you that out there now there are all the marques that you suggest. One thing that Open Source developers do not seem to be good at is working together on a common strategy. People complain that they don't want a 'Windows' UBUNTU, I would say to them "go and play with your little command lines shit and leave others to give us what we want." I can fix any problem with Microsoft software and maintain my computers with upgrades and good security, but I would like to do the same with UBUNTU. My only answer to big problems, which are usually caused by introducing new software from the list, is to reinstall UBUNTU thereby loosing all that I have built up as a running system of programmes. So, developers, please concentrate on getting a Windows replacement completed; then you can add the bells and whistles suggested, with the options of adding them or not.

ronald.r.victoriano
ronald.r.victoriano

been trying out 9,04 server and desktop 10.10 ready to be rolled out for a new startup company seems like all of it debian based. like freenas, pfsense and the rest is ubuntu 9.04 for smb and NX. it has one of the best documentations and lots of forum and blogs to learn from. im gonna try winbuntu win/mac/devbuntu. I hope my client will like it too.

johnny.r.parks.ii
johnny.r.parks.ii

I have migrated all of my machines to zorin os 4, win7 look and feel with options for vista, xp, win95 and even MacOS. Built on Ubuntu 10.10 it is stable, and has wine and Play On Linux for all those windows apps. Check it out!

shawfield
shawfield

I put a windows xp skin on an old netbook & gave it to my Father-in-law who is pretty computer illiterate. He has seen the Mother in Law using the XP based PC in their study & so is familiar with 'where things are'. He didnt even know it was Linux & I didnt tell him.

mikep
mikep

What is all the fuss about Ubuntu? It is only a single distribution and while it has dome a fair bit to get a Linux based OS into mainstream, it has done very badly with unstable software labelled as stable. I will never unsderstand the love relationship[ people have with Ubuntu. I have tried many of the main releases and quite a number of the respins of it and not a single one was stable enough for what I would call full-time production use. Mint got close, but it is still based on unstable software and so by virtue of its origin, it shares the "faulty gene pool" on which Ubuntu is built, which is Debian UNSTABLE which is NOT recommended for production use!. I asked our countries top level government agent why Linux is not used more and his response was "when it gets better, we will consider it", but when asked what he referred to as "it", guess what name popped up? Eewbuntu of course. Now had it been based on Testing rather than Unstable, maybe more government departments would consider it, and more likely again if Debian Stable is used. Ubuntu and most derivatives tend to be focussed on those who like to reinstall each 6 months, or more frequently due to the high possibility of breakage, but who the hell wants to do that? Why not get a very well assembled system based on Stable with some enhancements to allow rolling application upgrades via thoroughly tested backports instead?

VolkerBause
VolkerBause

While diversity is good, to much of anything can't be good for Linux. I believe their are enough distributions out their and their is absolutely no point in making Linux look like Windows as this puts the ball in Microsoft's hands. Linux should keep on doing what they do best and not try to imitate Microsoft. Having similar or better features is a always a good thing but that's where similarity should stop. If you ask me, Microsoft has always been looking what others have been doing. The only exception might be the Ribbon Interface (Maybe they stole this from somewhere as well) which many of my clients absolutely hate. Personally I don't care. It is a bit distracting sometimes when jumping between Linux and Windows but ultimately the choice is mine to use it or not. I generally use Libreoffice in Windows and Linux these days. For email I mostly use MDaemons webmail interface which is very similar to Evolution and Outlook. I haven't used Outlook for over 1/2 a year as it is pretty useless in some cases, especially when it comes to proper multi-tasking. I have started to test Evolution again which is much more capable in terms of IMAP where proper multi-tasking is an absolute requirement. Outlook always keeps on freezing when waiting for IO to happen in the background and that is really frustrating to me and my clients.

wa7qzr
wa7qzr

How about that? No more ubuntu whatsoever. It has really lowered the bar for what a distro should be. No system analysis required. No skill with programming languages necessary. Minimal creativity index. Just change some images. Mix & match some packages. Change the branding a bit and Wow! There's a new Linux! No. Wait. Nothing to see here. It's just another stupid ubuntu spin-off. Move along. Edit: I did forget. One needs a silly name. A really silly name. The sillier the better. So silly that Monty Python would blush. This is a rhetorical comment.

pfyearwood
pfyearwood

I would suggest Celtx for Writebuntu. It has formats for stage, screen, radio, and TV production of scripts. It also has formating for graphic novels/comic books and standard novels. I install it in all my *buntu systems. Also available in Windows and Mac flavors. My scriptwriting instructor suggested it to me. Paul

pinguy
pinguy

Pinguy OS is Mac like and based on Ubuntu. Bodhi Linux uses E17 and based on Ubuntu.

DaveDonaldson
DaveDonaldson

I work with older folks, grey hairs, trying to teach them how to use the laptops their adult children buy for them. Windows mostly confuses them, so a simplified interface with good functionality would be great for them. Jolicloud? Anybody have any experience with it and grey hairs?

cramos
cramos

Besides graphical/artist contesnt Ubuntu Studio includes content for music and video editing...

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Debian had no issue with the two nics on my Asus Striker2. I did have to include the correct drivers for my rack boxes and the Lenovo X201's wireless (wired nic was easily supported). Actually, with Ubuntu's lack of drivers in the default install I can see where you may have had some grief. I like Mint for that; they include relevant drivers in the default install even of those drivers are proprietary firmware. With Debian, you just add in the non-free repositories after install and it's golden. Ubuntu, I thought you just enabled the Metaverse repository with all the non-free stuff in it. Offhand, what motherboard make/model do you have that's giving you grief?

Slayer_
Slayer_

Someone should make this happen.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Canonical has got a good boost based on delivering liveCD isntalls; the booted image is what is stamped to the hard drive. What your talking about actually sounds like a full install method. Mandriva Free, Debian and what other's I've seen all have a step where they present a short list of function groups the user simply chooses to include. I am installing Mandriva, I check beside "graphic desktop", beside "network server", beside "network monitoring" and I get the base Mandriva install with a graphic desktop environment, standard server services and network monitoring software. With a full install, you essentually get a basic distribution install with optional layers to include on top. ha.. now that you make me think of it.. what we may need is Canonical publishing a full install version of Ubuntu in addition to the full install version of Ubuntu Server. No need to fragment the Ubuntu distro under it's own branding just because Canonical can't be bothered to ship anything but liveCD images.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Offhand, what touchscreen drivers did you use? I've an old CF27 collecting dust because it's proc/ram/hd are so far behind the rest of my hardware (the "rugged" is still way ahead though). Also, anyone have experience with Debian and touchscreens? I need to find a monitor or screen cover make/model but I'm trying to stick with Debian or at least drivers I can adopt from Ubuntu for the purpose.

jhinkle
jhinkle

I had to write some Nagios plugins for a previous job. Seriously, do us all a favor and quit monitoring your network with that junk. In my experience with managing large networks it's best to write something that fits the role of the job and not try to use some broadly designed networking tool. This goes for everything I've seen including proprietary software. Just write some php/css/snmp/mysql code to manage your networks, I've done it before and I'm telling you in the end you'll be much happier.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

You could look at Backtrack and the other various Net admin and security focused distributions but they do tent to be focusing on the client side. (one uses Backtrack as a workstation not as a production server). Something like Nagios can get pretty complex and/or be desirable as a dedicated server instead of Nagios on the same box as a bunch of unrelated network services. Even if it is desirable to include multiple unrelated services on the same server, you may want a specific combination. Someone who is managing a network through these tools probably has the skill to do a quick distro install with custom selection of tools. I'd personally choose the newer Icinga fork over Nagios and always include Monit for seeing details over time instead of current state and alarm triggers. I may do a Citadel mail server with it's built in groupware functions or I may want functions provided by Egroupware forcing the use of Courier or a mail server other than Citadel; it depends on the setup. For those who just want an appliance off the shelf, I think Nagios does provide a VM image; download, boot and start adding your network nodes. I know similar network monitoring apps do also offer VM appliances. For the next budget step up; Kbox or similar proprietary appliances are available. Buy it, remove the pretty bow, boot it up and start adding your network nodes. Hm.. you got me courios now so I checked Distrowatch but no category specific to network management. I thought there had been a liveCD made by one of the app developers in addition to VM appliances but can't spot it now. I'm going back to my first theory; people who monitor networks generally have the skills to do a custom distro install and the desire to use specific programs. It's not the sort of thing where you'd want all possible network monitor apps on a liveCD similar to how one would actually want all possible security tools on a liveCD together like Backtrack. For a business monitoring server, you want a more stream lines install with just the apps you will be using.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

The distribution is the common strategy. It's a collection of commodity parts assembled into a product for a given target use or customer. Suggesting all FOSS developers work together on a single set of project goals is like suggesting that all car manufacturers merge into one single mega-corp developing one single line of vehicles; a small car, a big car, a truck and a freighter - other vehicles will be produced by FOSSdom-Cars-R-Us. One can rationally suggest that GM's product line is too broad and needs to become more focused. One can rationally suggest that Canoncial's product line is too broad and needs to become more focused. One is not going to, or be in any possition to, demand that Ford, GM, Hyandai and the rest give up there project goals and merge any more than they can demand that Red Hat, Mandriva, Debian, Canonical and other distribution providers give up there own project goals and merge. One should focus on specific distributions rather than lumping anything FOSS developed into one single company unbrella as if it's all produced by the same corporation.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Not that it should change your choice to use them at all; just for clarity. Both FreeNAS and PFSense are based on FreeBSD. There was brief talk of using Debian for future FreeNAS builds but this decision was reverted iXSystems sponsorted further development. Being based on FreeBSD should actually increase the desirability of using these two specialty distributions.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Why would I drop down a fork to use something "production" based on testing and unstable code when I could remain with Debian Stable. It's not like Canonical's child fork offers some killer feature that would eclips Debian. And Ubuntu Server.. as long as it's based on testing/unstable code, it's not for production environments beyond inward facing home use. Don't get me wrong, I really like what Canonical has been able to do and that they do try to pass so many bug fixes back up to the Debian developers. I just question some of Canonical's config choices and premotion of beta software for production use.

jkameleon
jkameleon

Experience & skills: Pure zero. He bought the 1st computer in his life this year. He hates computers, but nowadays one can't live without one. Intended use: Browsing the internet, emailing, writing newspaper articles (and hopefully memoirs ;) ). Solution: Cairo dock and home page on desktop. As simple as that. Result: He was able to find his way around immediatelly, with minumum support.

pgit
pgit

I have a lot of elderly clients, with varying degrees of savvy. Before Linux really matured, when they finally got fed up with windows I'd recommend a Mac, and all of those people were very pleased with the move. I started putting a few folks into Linux around Mandrake 2005, though really didn't push it widely until Mandriva came out with 2008. Since then the elderly folks either deal with whatever windows came on their hardware or get a Linux system if they seem to be virus and malware-prone. The Linux users rarely call me after that, things just click along for them. The majority of calls are when they buy a new printer or monitor and need help setting it up. Unfortunately Mandriva is having ridiculous problems with basic stuff atm like getting flash to work in firefox. They have one shot at redemption with their upcoming 2011 release, after which people either bail in droves or Mandriva actually responds to bug reports again, after a 3 year period of dead silence in their own community. Fortunately the original Mandriva team is forking off with Mageia, which looks pretty good so far in alpha. There may well be a "good" choice here between the two, the measure being ease and simplicity. The older folks I witnessed butting heads with ubuntu hated it, so much so they returned equipment pre-installed with it. I even stumbled across an old woman using fedora, her grand son had set it up for her, all she knew is it's "a computer." So long as the three things an average end user wants to do works as expected, they don't much notice or care about the OS. The only factor I see is windows gets gunked up, Mac is expensive and Linux can frustrate people trying out there shiny new device on Christmas morning...

jhinkle
jhinkle

I don't think the distribution makes a huge difference for older people who barely use there computer. No matter what you tell them about why they do/don't want to use a certain OS it doesn't matter, they just want it to work. The biggest thing I found that helps, is to correlate their actual desk top, with the desk top on the computer. Once you get that mentality in place you can put some icons, maybe a script or two (batch, bash, powershell, perl, whatever floats your boat) to simplify some more complicated tasks and they're on there way.

LeonBA
LeonBA

I'll have to tell my coworkers who work with that stuff about this distro.

Alpha_Dog
Alpha_Dog

Funny you should mention the CF-27... I set one of those up with dapper. The touch screen driver wasn't easy, but there was a page I googled for the how to (don't remember specifically how right now). The issue is that the touch controller communicates on a serial port, not USB, and tends to interpret the click and double click in a wierd way. My CF27 is a 500MHz P3 and has the polymer backlit keyboard, touch screen, basic desktop and kodiak vehicle dock and a 100GB hd. If you want a kodiak dock for it (used in police cruisers), just drop me a line at aharper at lobo savvy dot com. I don't have keys (easy to replace) and you pay shipping :) I have 3 or 4 in storage. The newer toughbook is a CF72 which has a much simpler USB touch controller, more memory and can handle 10.04LTS (and presumably 10.10), Everything pretty much works out of the box, so the screen metrics of the netbook version lend themselves well to tablet operations. I was experimenting with CMU Sphinx for speech recognition, but I lost the time to screw with it as my business grew.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

It's a fork of Nagios that hasn't diverged very much in terms of compatability, still uses the nagios client plugins. It's not as open as a scratch built set of scripts but it's nearly naked config at install time leaves it wide open to config to one's specific needs.. or at least needs that fall within it's provided monitoring (unless one is going to write there own monitor taps). I love being able to config nodes, groups and services right down to specifying how the actual monitor command works. It made perfect sense and was pretty painless to setup once I figured out how the config files fit together. I go DIY with my log monitoring though; it's just too easy to add a crontab and grep what I want out of the log history.

Alpha_Dog
Alpha_Dog

...with Firefox's cache, favorites, and cookies sent to a USB drive or /dev/nul

Alpha_Dog
Alpha_Dog

My kids' first machines were a matched set of Panasonic CF47s. One of them still works 7 years later. Sadly, not the one that cartwheeled down the basement steps. The resulting impact killed the motherboard and lower case, but the hard disk and screen were still fine. I finally got rid of the spare parts from that one about 6 months ago on a recycling run.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Well, my first.. I treated my second a little better.. when I first got the first CF, I'd introduce it to friends by tossing it from about waist height and jump on it.. all while it was running a defrag or some such example. The toughbooks can take a heck fo a beating so I figure an old toughbook can manage being a children's first machine.

Alpha_Dog
Alpha_Dog

...it'll handle more than that! just be careful the little one doesn't hurt themselves or others with it. This is the one that has stopped bullets and survived car fires.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

.. but I can tell you the first time you read your email in the rain, you understand "rugged". (had only one or two to skim through and figured "why bolt for a door when it's 'rugged' anyhow?). Good to hear about the 72. I've actually been on an X201 for lack of budget and confirmation how the newer hardware dealt with *nix installs. If I can get around the budget limit, I'll have to see how a Debian install goes. Sounds like it's also time to pull the 27 out of storage and get back to building out a starter machine for my little one (I figured a Toughbook can deal with a little juice spill and rinse from time to time).