Linux

100 best Linux apps


This has received many Diggs since it was posted in the Ubuntu forum, but just in case you missed it, here's a list of the "Top 100 Open-Source Linux Apps" as compiled by TheWiseNoob. It's still being updated with installation info and additions, but this list is obviously a very helpful project -- well-organized (by type of app) and comprehensive. Do you have any to add? Here are the Noob's categories:

  1. BitTorrent Clients
  2. EyeCandy
  3. File Browser/Search
  4. Games
  5. Graphics and Text Viewers/Editors
  6. Music and Video Players
  7. Network Programs
  8. Programming IDEs
  9. Sound/Video Editors and Disc Burning Utilities
  10. Web Browsers

Feel free to submit your own Top 10 list here (one in each category?) and lobby for your favorites. Being a "noob" myself, I would be interested in your opinions; plus, even the Linux gurus among you might want to learn about some killer apps that you haven't yet stumbled across.

About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

36 comments
ekennedy1
ekennedy1

Never mind all 100 apps for linux I have only a handfull of apps thats really worth using and for a start:- 1 Worker File Manager 2 Opera Browser 3 Nero 3 for Linux 4 OpenOffice 5 Kate Text Editor 6 Synaptic Package Manager Plus a few more lesser apps that can be used by worker to give a user a very comprehensive application that is more than capable of suiting every user. No!!!? I don't get paid to praise these apps but who needs paying anyway as the privilage of using these free apps is more than payments could ever be. I'm not sure wether any of these apps are open source but who cares, I certainly don't and never will either. EKennedy

mickydee55
mickydee55

Here is another example of the government and corporate money intermingling together to run ourlives. I do not condone what the man did but to force him to use a platform of a certain company is unconstitutional and I would think a conflict of interest.

apotheon
apotheon

I like: OpenSSH -- Gotta have my encrypted remote access, and nothing in my experience provides as good a combination of security, convenience, and ubiquity as SSH for that purpose. Vim -- Nothing compares to Vim for power and flexibility in a text editor. mutt -- I've never use an email client or mail user agent that was so much of an email management productivity boost. Mutt is to email was Vim is to text files of all sorts. rxvt-unicode (aka urxvt) -- It's the best terminal emulator I've ever used, complete with Unicode support and a size that makes xterm look positively bloated. It also runs using a client/server model, which provides some nice operational flexibility (though most people will never find a need for that). AHWM -- I've never touched a GUI that enhanced my productivity so much. Ruby/irb and Perl -- Perl and Ruby are both excellent administration tools as programming languages. In addition, Ruby's interactive interpreter (basically a Ruby shell) is incredible. Among other things, it has become my default calculator (and yes, it [b]is[/b] really that convenient to use). The OCaml "toplevel" (another interactive interpreter) would be as useful to me if not for the fact OCaml is a statically typed language, which is good for some things of course, but not for others. catdoc -- This is my preferred means of dealing with MS Office documents. It dumps the contents of such documents to plain text, thus ensuring that A) they're not vulnerable to macro viruses, B) they're readable with basically anything, and C) they're more easily managed using other tools (like scripting, version control systems, and so on). They also take up significantly less space on my hard drive that way, and are better suited to backing up. OTR plugin -- It doesn't work with the IM clients I'd like to use, but it works with Gaim/Pidgin, which is at least "good enough". It's an encryption plugin that provides what's known as "perfect forward security". CUPS browser configuration -- Including the browser-based configuration, the Common Unix Printing System actually makes printer configuration easier than it is with MS Windows. Without the browser-based config, however, CUPS is a real pain in the butt. MPlayer -- I'll just throw MPlayer into this list. With the right media codecs and a browser plugin installed, it's kinda like Windows Media Player, except it's a lot more flexible, does a lot more, isn't as big a resource hog, and has an interface that doesn't drive me up the wall. Notably absent, and worth mentioning: Firefox -- It's crap, really. It just happens to be the least stinky browser in a world where all browsers are crap. It's the best of a bad breed -- but that doesn't really qualify it as one of my favorite applications. FreeBSD -- I'd list some other software, except that it's not Linux software. It's (Free)BSD software instead. Since the entire exercise was oriented toward Linux applications, I focused on software that runs on Linux. Gaim/Pidgin -- I use Gaim all the time, and will probably end up moving on to Pidgin eventually, unless I get OTR support in a better IM client at some point. Frankly, OTR is the one reason I use Gaim rather than something like CenterIM. GIMP -- It's great for what it does, and for my needs in that area, but that isn't exactly a major part of my daily work needs. Also, y'know, I don't personally like working with digital image editing much. Sometimes I need to, and the GIMP is great for those needs, but that doesn't make it one of my favorite applications. OpenOffice.org -- Thank goodness for OpenOffice.org: because of this office suite, on the rare occasion that I need interoperability with MS Office documents, I don't have to use MS Office to get it. On the other hand, like all office suites, it sucks (so it's a bit of a trade-off). Wine -- It's kind of a necessary evil, because I like to play World of Warcraft. It's amazing, though, the way it makes WoW run better than it does on MS Windows. Samba, Apache, et cetera -- Technically, not end-user applications, and not close enough to being end-user applications to feel like I should make any exceptions. All of the above items are just what I came up with off the top of my head. I'm sure that, given more time, my list would look significantly different.

TechExec2
TechExec2

. VMware Workstation 6 is a delightful commercial application for Linux. It even supports multiple monitors and multiple CPUs. It enables me to run Windows XP and a few remaining Windows applications on my Kubuntu Linux workstation without compatibility issues.

timetrap
timetrap

Hmmm . . . it seems that to be a "Best App" you MUST have a great GUI. How far the mighty have fallen. (It is nice to see rtorrent on the list, which IMO is the BEST bt client on the list)

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

Good List, I was surprised that Cedega was not on it though.

jlwallen
jlwallen

but i would make some changes to that list. in fact i think it could be better served to simply step up and list your top 100 linux/opensource applications. mine would at least start like this: 1. Firefox 2. Thunderbird 3. OpenOffice 4. Apache 5. The Gimp 6. Enlightenment 7. GnuCash 8. Aterm 9. Scribus 10. gtk-pod this might be a good topic for me to blog on. i'll compile my top 100 Linux/Open Source apps and see where we go from there.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Sounds like you want the other forum discussing the case of the copywrite infringement criminal who's been allowed to continue having access to a computer as long as they use a specific piece of software for monitoring network use. This'd be the forum you want: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/opensource/?p=93

catseverywhere
catseverywhere

First off, to the list of live cd-based Linux distros, I add the one mastered by the very man who gave the world live scripts, and thus the very existence of Linux on a live cd, Tomas M's Slax. Tomas doesn't recommend anyone install Slax permanently, but I did anyway, it's my main use OS anymore, lives on my laptop beside the below... Mandriva One is also nothing to be sneezed at. It is the ONLY distro I have ever seen pick up a WPA encrypted wifi connection at boot. Now, let's see how many of my top 10 have a GUI... 1. rsync -backups, check recent changes 2. ssh -how else you gonna keep the web site up to date? Use w/#1 for remote backups 3. cron -your system uses this, even if you don't 4. cups -even Windows has support, though they don't like to tell you 5. wireshark -"oh, it's only another dictionary attack from China..." (

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

og "must have a good gui" issues, HTF does Azureus keep scoring so high? Its slow, a memory hog, and glitches out alot. This is based on my own testing and the endless problems my father had over the last year or so until I got him to switch to deluge. BTW. uTorrent works perfectly under either wine or crossover. You just have to browse to the uTorrent client the first time you open a torrent to set the binary as your default.

brian.mills
brian.mills

A great GUI gives n00bs like me a much easier and more comfortable interface to deal with. It's nice that for n00bs there's a GUI app and for more experienced users there's a CLI app to do most anything in Linux. I think I may have to start using Linux for more than just a Samba server and load it on my laptop. I just really don't like doing the whole dual-boot thing. I hate having to reboot to use an app or two, though I think Photoshop is about the only one that I'd really need Windows for anymore, at least until I get a Mac :).

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

The Big Ticket Items: X/KDE (graphic desktop - started manually) - KDE Storage Media applet - KDE Quick Launcher applet - KDE Trashbin applet - Knetload - Kcpuload - Gnome System Monitor VMware Server - eGroupware Server (always running) - Dev Webserver (always running) - hosts the rest of the OS collection ClamAV (AV to protect the Windows systems) Used Daily: Firefox (website viewing) Gaim (IM - pidgin when Mandriva includes it) Thunderbird (Email) NVU (website development) Eterm (my pretty terminal window from X) OpenSSH (remote shell, ftps, scp) K3B (cd/dvd burning for backups) Samba (mounts a Windows Share on the NAS) gFTP (to be replaced by Filezilla soon) VLC (video player) Amarok (music library and player) kOrganizer (Outlook replacement) Kept Handy: GIMP (photoshop) OpenOffice (office suite) Skype (Voip calling) Remote Desktop Client (Terminal Server client) VPN Client (where I can't use ssh or TS client) Xtraceroute (traceroute graphed over a globe) Konsole (terminal emulator backup) Xterm (terminal emulator backup) Now I gotta go update all the software on my system with a single simple command and see if Filezilla and Pidgin are available by package install. Bahahahahahaaa

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

My list: 1) Cedega 2) Wine 3) WoW (gotta have me some WoW...Oh god I miss you so much WoW...I'm sorry baby!) 4) Emacs 5) nano 6) vlc - video player 7) xine - video player 8) xmms - mp3 player 9) SCUMMVM - to play the old SCUMM games like Full Throttle

apotheon
apotheon

I actually actively dislike a couple of those (OpenOffice.org comes to mind -- but then, I actively dislike [b]any[/b] office suite, so that's nothing special). Generally, however, I understand some good reasons for liking some of those options in particular. I'm curious, though, about your choice of terminal emulator. Why aterm, as opposed to some of the alternatives? I'd appreciate it if you'd share some of your reasons. I'm not saying it's a bad choice -- in fact, it was my terminal emulator of choice for a while, too. I'm just curious, as I said.

apotheon
apotheon

"[i]10. units -believe it or not, it converts miles per hour into furlongs per fortnight.[/i]" What's the syntax for that?

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Mind you, part of my interest is the very fact that I get to explore more than one OS. But, rebooting is not so bad for the few things that require Windows: Games - going to be in a game for a long while so a few minutes rebooting is no issue. Sync Palm/Outlook/Phone - existing data and add/update whatever else there is there. If your rebooting for Photoshop or AutoCAD your also likely to be there a while so it's the same as Gaming. Check out VMware server though or any of the other virtualization offerings. Unless I'm gaming, I can run everything I need under a win32 VM including printing on my Windows Only hardware.

apotheon
apotheon

You might consider PC-BSD instead of a Linux distro, especially if you're a fan of flashy GUIs with all the bells and whistles. It appears that the new version of PC-BSD defaults to KDE/Beryl, which means a 3D accelerated desktop interface that puts Aero (Vista) and Aqua (MacOS X) to shame. re: Photoshop Do you prefer Photoshop over the GIMP? If so -- why? If it's the differences in the interface, you might give GIMPShop a try. It's just the GIMP with a Photoshop-like interface. If it's because of the better support for design for print media that Photoshop offers, I'm afraid there isn't really an answer to that problem as far as I'm aware. Since I don't require a lot of print media work, however, the GIMP suits my needs pretty well. I even prefer the GIMP interface over that of Photoshop (once I got over the difference from Photoshop, of course).

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I'll happily pay for a copy of NeverWinter Nights. As a game producer, they had the balls to also release a Linux native front end for it. Granted, you have to jump through some hoops to copy the game data files over during the initial native *nix binary setup but if the binary get's enough interest, they may realize it's worth writing an installer. Say, is Full Throttle the old Dos biker adventure game? I've got the disks for that someplace around here.

jlwallen
jlwallen

i like aterm because it does a few things really well. the primary thing is does well is run commands. ;-) quickly follow that with it's ability to take switches like: aterm -tr -tint magenta -fg black -bg blue +sb to fine tune the look of my terminal. and since i keep a terminal open all the time, at least i can make it look good.

apotheon
apotheon

I'll just read the manpage at some point. It complains that it doesn't know the unit "per".

catseverywhere
catseverywhere

We just fired it up and it asks "you have?" so we put something like 12 MPH and hit enter. It then asks "you want?" and we typed out "furlongs per fortnight" and there it was. I go out of my way to point that, VYM, Kontact and a couple other productivity tools out to everyone I get grab.

DanLM
DanLM

lol, I had to try it as soon as I read that post. disone$ units '10 mph' 'furlongs/fortnight' * 26880 / 3.7202381e-05 dan

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

that so far no one has mentioned that Ubuntu/Kbuntu are the same OS. The difference is in the widow manager and desktop. I have Ubuntu installed on a desktop, but there are several KDE apps I prefer (k3b, smb4k) so I installed a full kde desktop. In the past I have installed XFCE and blackbox, so I have my choice of 4 different desktops when I log in (using the session button). As long as you have at least a 5 GB partition, you should be able to install both KDE and Gnome under Ubuntu or Kbuntu. My impressions overall are that KDE is more configurable, but some of the settings are buried in weird places, Gnome either has a setting in an obvious control panel, or its text-file hacking time. KDE seems to handle wireless better, or at least smoother then Gnome. The kde wireless tools seem more robust. I tested this on a dell laptop with an intel wireless card which just worked after install, and with the 7.04 live cd. Honestly, I use several desktops at different times. I have a light blackbox I use when playing Postal or NeverwinterNights. I use Gnome as my daily desktop for my desktop, and KDE on my laptop. I run Ubuntu in a vm on my laptop (need XP and certain windows only apps at work.) and when I full screen the VM window, you would not know it was a VM. The hardware support for VM images built into the processor, as well as dual core technology, makes VMs run at near native speeds. Of course, It helps that VMware lets you dedicate a disk or partition to a VM instead of limiting you to a file based "hard drive", this speeds up access times a lot. And if you could find another 512 MB ram for your test server, that would make a good VM sever. If you have not used linux since Debian Woody, I really, really recommend you look into it again. Debian Etch is very nice, it has a similar feel to Woody, but all upgraded and clean. (I set up a Squid/Clamav/Squidguard web filter and proxy for a 5 station call center using Debian Etch. They NEED to access the internet infrequently, so an old 900 Mhz celeron with 384MB ram works just fine, of course I set it to boot with no gui by default, and disabled all non-necessary services (that I could find-a linux God I am not)). Ubuntu flavors are good, but the default security model needs to be tweeked. That goes for Mint Linux as well. which is based on Ubuntu, but has a few distro designed control panels that are quite nice. PC-Linux OS is popular, and would be a good choice to try out, and while your at it, look into PC-BSD. Shoot, for testing purposes, you could install a ton of distros on one hard drive, giving each a 5 to 10 GB root partition and sharing /boot /home and swap across distros.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

CS1 then that will run fairly well under Crossover on linux. CS2 and CS3 are not well supported yet, but should be soon, as these are major players in the slow-adoption-because-of-commercial apps argument against linux. As for Mac, I will say this...."They just work..." right up until something doesn't, then its a major pain in the ass to figure out why. Sadly, I prefer either Windows XP or linux to Mac OSX. As for booting your laptop from usb, is it powerful enough to run VMware server? (P4 2Ghzish and 512 to 1GB ram?) Because vms will run just fine from an external usb drive.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I've yet to have a Linux distribution that wouldn't install easily under VMware. I've actually got a client running VMware Server on his work machine so he can boot a Linux distro guest as an ssh front end for the web server. We may even build the webserver version three or four as a VM: - contains the mess in one place if we get cracked - snapshots let us revert if a config or patch goes bad - copy the VM to a new VM if we're testing a new build - let us build other related VM like a seporate mail/groupware server for the office staff It was a no brainer install under Windows and as simple under Linux. In direct comparison with the same VM off a neutral partition I found VMware to be more efficent under Linux. Under a Windows host, the VMs really responded like they where a guest under an emulated layer. With a Linux host, I can blow the VM up to full screen and you wouldn't know you where under an emulation layer except if you tried to run a game or heavy 3D. (no real surprise or bashing there though as one is designed to be pretty and hold your hand where the other is designed to be efficient and both have there uses) There are some other VM offerings I want to look at like KVM but so far, VMware is what I'd recommend anyone start with on either Windows, *nix or osX.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

It isn't worth fighting the 16-bit / 24-bit color issue to get Linux to run under MS Virtual PC, especially if you don't already know Linux. I tried it this summer. After I switched to VMware Server the Linux installs went much smoother. I also thought there was a minor but noticeable improvement in performance under VM compared to MS VPC. Since they're both free, I second TE2's recommendation: go with VMware.

TechExec2
TechExec2

. Which would work better? I'll offer information and you can decide which is right for you. [b]Kubuntu/Ubuntu in a VM[/b] One advantage of Linux in a VM is the virtual hardware is supported, even on a laptop (no special laptop hardware issues). I run regularly Linux in a VM and it works well (1). As you know, a VM robs some performance (say about 25%) so long as you give it a healthy amount of real RAM. If you're running on a slower laptop, or only able to give a small amount of RAM (e.g. 128MB or 256MB) this will be much more noticeable. You know what to expect with running Windows XP on a PC with just 128 MB or 256 MB. Same for Linux. RAM is cheap these days. Be generous and enjoy. An option to consider: Run the free VMware Player (2) with a free preconfigured virtual machine you can download (3). The only reservation I have about this is that you're completely trusting the person who built the VM and installed the OS. Malware? You might consider downloading a prebuilt VMware Appliance and then install your own OS over it. Just a thought (I haven't tried this...I bought VMware Workstation 6 and built my own VMs to run in the Player). If you want to try multiple Linux distros, VMs are a great way to go. [b]Kubuntu/Ubuntu on real hardware[/b] Linux runs really well in a VM. I run a Linux VM on my ThinkPad (Windows XP for now) at all times. But, I spend most of my Linux time on a very fast desktop PC (with Windows XP in a VM :^0 ). Running on real hardware does make a difference. You'll get the full experience. That's what I recommend if you can do it. Tip: Avoid dual booting on the same hard drive. Instead, use a separate hard drive for each OS and swap them out via "drive drawers" (4). This avoids one OS damaging another one (Windows is famous taking over the boot sector and forcing you to repair it). And, it avoids accidents. If your only experience with Windows was in a VM, you would have a distorted picture of Windows. Same for Linux. This is [u]much[/u] less of an issue if you run the VM on a really fast multi-processor PC. Such a PC is so fast that you almost cannot tell it's in a VM. That Windows XP in a VM on Linux I run even plays video with sound well. Good luck! -------------------------------------- (1) Cautionary note: Some VM software only supports 16-bit color (Virtual PC in particular). Most Linux distros start with 24-bit color. As a result, you'll start with scrambled video and be "stuck" unless you know what to do. Getting around this is simple. You just need to force the Linux to use 16-bit video. Kubuntu makes this easy. There is an option on the startup screen. BTW: I've found VMware to be significantly faster and better in many ways than VirtualPC. After having used both, I would say don't even bother with VirtualPC. (2) VMware Player http://www.vmware.com/products/player/ (3) VMware Virtual Appliance Marketplace http://www.vmware.com/appliances/ (4) "Drive Drawers" http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/ProductDetail.jsp?ProductCode=269832

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

either one will probably run faster loaded in a dual-boot config than they will as virtual machines. It depends on the hardware configuration of the desktop you'd be dual-booting on versus the config of the laptop you'd be using for virtualization.

brian.mills
brian.mills

As soon as I get my Linux fileserver build out of the way and can reclaim my test box from Windows Home Server (nice software, just doesn't suit my needs), I'm gonna load either Ubuntu or Kubuntu (or maybe dual-boot between the two) and play around with the desktop functionality. Or maybe I should just load them onto virtual machines on my laptop and test them that way. Any recommendations as to which would work better?

TechExec2
TechExec2

. I haven't looked into exactly how the Kubuntu "live" CD allocates resources, but I expect the more RAM the better. Since it doesn't touch your hard drive, it has to rely on a RAM drive for all writable storage and the read-only CD itself. I've seen some "live" CDs recommend a minimum of 1 GB of RAM because of this. I ran the Kubuntu "live" CD on a ThinkPad with 1GB of RAM and 1.4 GHz Pentium M processor and it ran OK. I did notice that starting programs from the CD was relatively a bit slower than from a HDD (no surprise there). On the desktop PCs I have installed it onto, Kubuntu (and the KDE GUI) run just fine. The slowest of these (Athlon XP 3000+, 1.8GHz, 1.5 GB RAM) was pretty fast when compared with older and slower semi-retired machines that people often try Linux out on for the first time. Linux is an efficient OS, but fast hardware still matters, especially when you're running a fancy KDE or GNOME object-oriented GUI on a workstation. So, I essentially give a Linux GUI workstation about the same hardware I would give to Windows XP. No scrimping. Suggestions: ** A fast dual-core CPU makes a world of difference. ** 2GB-4GB of RAM makes a world of difference. Add as much RAM as necessary to avoid virtual memory disk paging. Load all the programs you work with and leave them running. Then there is no (more) waiting to start up and no waiting to switch between them. ** A fast 7200 RPM SATA 300 MBps hard drive with high recording density (all the current models are) makes a big difference. ** A fast [u]hardware[/u] video card (PCIe 16x preferred, AGP 8x minimum) is important even for mere "office applications" like OpenOffice. Good luck!

apotheon
apotheon

"[i]Maybe Gnome is better on resources than KDE is, I dunno.[/i]" I'm not sure which is the bigger resource hog these days, but both KDE and GNOME are pretty bad in that respect. I've noticed that some LiveCD distros run more slowly than others, though. I suspect it has something to do with how the LiveCD was put together, and not so much to do with the software on it. Don't take the relative slowness of Kubuntu from LiveCD to indicate that it'd be slower when installed, in any case -- you should compare apples to apples (in this case, HDD installed compared to HDD installed) if you want to know which is actually slower when installed on the system. For some reason, I've found FreeSBIE to be absurdly slow when run from the LiveCD, even though the FreeBSD OS iteself is blazing fast when installed on the hard drive. In fact, I get better performance in general out of FreeBSD than I ever did out of any Linux distro. I'm sure the same could apply to slow Linux LiveCDs as compared with fast Linux LiveCDs: the LiveCD version shouldn't be used as a means of comparing OS performance for something installed to the hard drive.

brian.mills
brian.mills

I tried Kubuntu on my laptop, but it seemed to run really slowly whenever it needed to read from the CD to get something. I ran regular Ubuntu from CD when I was testing the hardware in the server I'm currently building, and it ran fast, even when accessing the CD for information. Maybe Gnome is better on resources than KDE is, I dunno. The only things I seemed to have problems with hardware-wise on my notebook was the built-in webcam and the widescreen display, though the display issue was probably due to the default configs for booting from CD and would be resolved once installed to disk. Unlike the days when I was running Debian Woody instead of Win98, I'm not brave enough yet to dump XP for Linux, since XP works (most of the time). I think I'll load Ubuntu on my "old" server (an eMachines with a Celeron D processor and 512MB RAM) and play with it there for a while before I do anything to my laptop. I'm just not brave enough to totally jump to the other side anymore.

TechExec2
TechExec2

. [b][i]"...If only I could get my laptop to boot from a USB drive, I could try out all the different Linux and BSD systems I wanted from there and never touch my internal drive..."[/i][/b] Many Linux distributions boot and run directly from the CD these days. You don't have to install to a hard disk to fully try it out. These CDs provide the easiest and quickest operating system installation I have ever seen, even better than Windows Vista. And, I've run every version of Windows dating back to 1992. These boot and run from the CD (and optionally install by double-clicking an icon on the Linux desktop). Download the ISO file, burn it to a CD, and boot from it. Kubuntu (the one I run) 1. Immediately boot and run directly from the CD. Or, 2. Full install from the CD to the HDD in 15 minutes! (fast hardware) http://www.kubuntu.com Ubuntu http://www.ubuntu.com PCLinuxOS http://www.pclinuxos.com Enjoy! P.S. Bear in mind that special hardware on notebooks will often be undersupported or unsupported by Linux (e.g. "WinModems"). I had a great experience with Kubuntu on my ThinkPad (including wireless networking), but there were still a few minor things that were not quite right (e.g. dual monitor support, but that might have been fixed by using the ATI binary driver). Linux is best tried for the first time on a modern desktop PC.

brian.mills
brian.mills

Actually, I prefer Photoshop because that's what my wife's been helping me to learn. She's a professional graphic artist working in the print industry, so Photoshop and Illustrator are two of her main tools of the trade. If I get stuck trying to do something, I can just ask "hey, honey, how do I do..." and she usually knows 5 ways to do it. I've got Creative Suite on my laptop for me to learn and for her to use when she needs her software away from home, since she has an iMac and not a laptop of her own. If only I could get my laptop to boot from a USB drive, I could try out all the different Linux and BSD systems I wanted from there and never touch my internal drive.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I've always got one of my desktops covered with four terminals. Eterm's default size fits 1280x1024 well. I also like that I can make them relatively pretty but that's a habbit from running Enlightenment before switching to KDE. I used to use rxvt alot also for containing BitchX.

apotheon
apotheon

I used to use aterm all the time. Eventually, its lack of Unicode support convinced me to move on. I gave up aterm's transparency effects for a lot of coolness when I switched to urxvt (aka "rxvt-unicode") -- all without even hitting the application size of xterm. Granted, most of it is stuff most people will never need, but the unicode part is probably more important than most people realize (at least, if you use your terminal emulator for more than just issuing basic commands). By the way, aterm is based on rxvt (just not the unicode version).