Linux

A house divided: Linux factions threaten success

Linux is at a major tipping point, yet it faces being undermined from within. Jack Wallen calls for the Linux community to end the fighting between the Linux camps.

It seems you can't throw a stick these days without hitting one Linux "camp" hating another. One camp hates Canonical and Ubuntu, one camp hates GNOME, another hates FOSS and Richard Stallman, and yet another hates any given piece of proprietary software that might find its way onto the, otherwise, open source desktop.

From my perspective, that is not only counter to what Linux should stand for, it's a major stumbling block for the heights of success Linux could actually reach.

Instead of the Linux community cheering Ubuntu on for the success they have started to taste on the desktop and the business world, they are lashing out for Ubuntu to be forked and proclaiming Canonical to be insolvent. Instead of backing the product they helped to build, they are jumping the shark and proclaiming the Linux desktop dead.

I have one simple question to ask...

What good does it do Linux as a whole for it's constituent parts to hope for the other parts to fail? Is it done in the hopes that X's failure will be Y's success? Has it reached a point that Ubuntu and Linux Mint see one another as competition?

I get it; we all want our distribution of choice to be a huge success. We want to be a part of that something special when Linux finally breaks through the veil it's been peering through for over a decade. But here's the problem: I'm not sure Linux can break through that veil if it continues to be served by such a fragmented community.

Yes, I understand -- there are people out there that don't agree with how some distributions have changed. So what? It's a dog-eat-dog world out there in the IT industry and every company needs as much of an edge as they can get. If that means taking a lot of decisions in-house, then so be it. But if the Linux community continues to isolate those distributions who currently teeter on the very special precipice (of success), it is possible they could prevent those distributions from making a dive into very successful waters.

This is not where Linux should be and it's a shame there are distributions and sub-communities out there doing everything they can to prevent other distributions from garnering success. Seriously -- who cares which Linux distribution makes it, so long as one does.

Right now, there are two platforms that have achieved real, tangible success: Android and Chrome. Both of those platforms are driven by Google. Think about that for a moment. Put that into your compiler and see what it kicks out. For the longest time Google was the kid on the playground who it was popular to hate. Did Google care? Not one bit. Google just did whatever it had to in order to get where it needed to go. Now its Chromebook has pretty much shown the world that a flavor of Linux can succeed on the desktop.

Ubuntu is now the favorite kid to hate. Who's next? Linux Mint? Debian? Fedora? Bodhi? Ubuntu is either going to massively succeed or tragically fail. When either happens, another distribution will come along and try to either repeat their success or succeed where they failed.

I have another option to offer.

What if the whole of Linux got together and finally realized that when one succeeds, we all succeed. The world (especially those in and around the Microsoft camp) have said for years that Linux would never succeed. What the Linux community (as a whole) needs to do is band together and prove them wrong. Now is the perfect time for that. With Android and Chrome already enjoying some serious success, it only stands to reason that another distribution could come in, as a full-blown desktop solution, and fill in the gaps left by a mobile Linux solution and a browser-based Linux solution.

Who cares which one it is, so long as it happens.

Let it be Ubuntu, or Mint, or Fuduntu, or Fedora, or Bodhi, or whatever flavor of the month is in vogue. I don't care. I long ago set aside my political and legal issues with Linux and simply focused on what needs to happen for Linux -- as a whole -- to finally make it. At this particular moment, what needs to happen is for every member of the Linux community to come together and cheer one another on. Once one of the distributions has reached that pinnacle of success, all the others will be able to bask in its glory and hop a ride on the penguin's coattails.

That will never happen if the various distributions (and developers and fans of those distributions) continue to pour vitriol into the Kool-Aid.

So, what do you say, do you think you can set aside all those differences that are in the way of seeing the similarities? We all want the same thing -- for Linux to succeed.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

129 comments
lord_beavis
lord_beavis

"There are still those in the elitist camp, who troll beginner forums looking for opportunities to mock neophytes" I've talked with some folks that are very technically literate and when they find out that I'm a Linux advocate, they step back and look at me funny. Then I find out that back when they looked at Linux, they've ran into those yahoo's. There is a movement happening to quell that and make it more inviting, but it is an uphill battle.

lord_beavis
lord_beavis

That lady that bought a Dell with Linux and then wigged out because she couldn't use it for school. Oh, wait that was a M$ planted scenario...

The_Real_BSAFH
The_Real_BSAFH

"but your point fell apart when you cited administering servers. " How did Beavis's point fall apart exactly?

vinuz
vinuz

Look who is going to be thrown out from the market if Linux factions join hands.... People must learn from their experiences, share best practices so that each other can benefit.

emenau
emenau

The oldest trick in the book. And the corporate snakes use it over and over again. Time for the Linux camp to wake up, and take a stand.

CharlesG1970
CharlesG1970

Linux is a geek toy for coder junkies and the techno fetish out there. Sure you don't have to tell me it is the best, I already know that. It is fast, stable, secure, and configurable. What’s not to love, well the fact that you NEED to know how to configure it to use it. Look Apple is starting to really make some headway in the desktop/laptop category, and the reason is that Apple tells you how to do things the "Right" (apple) way, and that is what the consumer sheep of the world like. OK to the Apple boys out there if it was really about apple being better they would have been competing much better back in the 90's. It is consumerism that is driving apple. The majority of users now well beyond love their computers because the computer is a fantastic computation machine. They just want to get thing done and the more options there are the more work it takes to get the job done. With Linux you can be more efficient, but only after you have invested massive amounts of energy investigating the options and the settings and the releases and the desktops etc. etc. etc. Good luck to Linux, but you are still setting up the car while Apple and M$ have already finished the race. Now Apple and Google are already on the track and you are still infighting about the best desktop. Please... Well each to their own. You have fun, well the rest of the world moves on to mobile (using your core). And by the time you have a viable mobile solution, the world will be using glass and iWatch and other Sci-Fi that is only in our imagination right now. Hey, you should feel good, the big boys will still probably use a few of your ideas (let’s face it you Linux people are real smart) to make their goodies great. But it will never be Linux on desk top, or even Linux mobile. But power to the geeks we need all your hard work to keep the servers running.

jmmcn
jmmcn

Jack, decent enough thoughts...ten years ago (I say gently). So, as you're posting this, I just reviewed/caught-up with the current Ubuntu+Mir vs. EveryoneElse+Wayland-Weston status. Seems just when you want consolidation, you're going to get MORE bifurcation, more agitation, more confusion. And actually...I WANT this. I don't want 'unification'. I want some high-quality binary distros (Fedora, Slackware, etc.) when I need them and I ALSO want 'rolling' release models to avoid upgrade woes (think Funtoo, Gentoo, Arch, etc.) when I need those. The whole idea with GNU was that users and businesses be FREE (first and formemost) to run software on our PCs which we knew was free from corporatization, that we could learn from and that we could change if we needed to. I've never liked comparisons to Apple and MS, and I've never liked conversations which try to mix these software worlds. Indeed, so many coporations USE (and sell!) GNU/Linux, but I (still) don't consider GNU/Linux 'corporatized' (if you can understand that). GNU/Linux is NOT a "company", so imho, its always unfair to speak about it in comparison to Apple and MS (and IBM, etc.). Red Hat competes in their space, but I don't consider Red Hat anything like Apple and MS. Quick...who is Red Hat's CEO?, COO?...right, you have to think a little, no? That's my point. I for one, want the GNU/Linux ecosphere to remain like the, crowded, noisy market in Dehli (and I suspect, so does Red Hat et. al.). We welcome competition in the Free Software space, not try to squelch it and patent-troll it away like Apple and MS. I'd prefer GNU/Linux not to 'corporatize' any more than it has, and it's slow, but steady progress has been proven and will continue as a huge positive for business and mobile worlds. Imho, the framework with Linus T. et. al. and the Linux Foundation, even though mostly supported by corporate interests, seems to be the most efficient way to keep activity at the kernel focused on quality, and not be (as much as possible) 'bent' to any one corporate demand. And the channel for any and all to contribute to the kernel is as wide open as ever, and needs to remain so. It's all about the kernel - imho, let's never lose sight of that. Then, I say, let's support those who are trying to keep the kernel as high quality, open, free and supportive. The userland stuff (distros, display servers, managers, WMs etc.) will always be in flux and forever changing. In 10 years, Mir and Wayland, maybe even Ubuntu(?) will have moved on, but the kernel - THAT must remain strong and of high quality, or we have nothing. Imho, I more concerned about the post-Linus era than anything else, but I think he's done an excellent job in building a development model where he can step away and the quality will remain.

lefty.crupps
lefty.crupps

Linux is all about choice, yes. But I think a lot of the fighting comes from the idea of having to support someone's software choice that I didn't choose. For example, I find Gnome to be too simple; I can't get anything done because there are no useful options in pretty much every app I've opened. True story. So when my new convert says Gnome is amazing and great, I have to prove he is wrong! On the faceless internet, this is even easier to take this path to battle. How can you not see the amazingness that is KDE? How can a distro be short-sited enough to move to System V? Why would I want to learn something new and complex, Grub2, when the old text-config version one worked well very without the stupid binary setups?

Kieron Seymour-Howell
Kieron Seymour-Howell

To me, the offerings of the various Linux distros are like the variations in vehicles that are available. Cars are sold for how they look to some people, what they can do for others, how unique they are or creative, or not, to yet more people. Are cars in danger of being swept away because there are too many designs or ideas out there? No, not in the least. The day you find all the versions of Linux merging and becoming one, is the day you will find everyone suddenly liking the same fashion, food, choice of vehicle, and living arrangements. I think it is a pretty safe bet, this will not happen soon, if ever. The Linux experience, is like choosing clothes, food or art. Sometimes what makes perfectly logical sense to some, is mind boggling stupid to others, but it works for most people, just like the various other choices in life. Windows and Mac, or Android and iOS, are all about predictability, or reliability without surprises and a low learning investment once you get the basics. To many people, this is not really about choice, but what they were exposed too, or annoyed the most by, or had pushed upon them by family, work, or school. Linux is a bit more about creative expression, freedom of choice and individuality, but, then again so is the Windows and Mac choice really. Any one person, cannot and will not ever be able to see the world from the unique perspectives of anyone else, though many people are victims of their own false assumptions that they can. Until the day we all become clones linked with some ESP virtual network, everything will be as different as it possibly can be, while still working as well. No matter what OS, or computing device we have, as long as we can all browse the Net, chat, send email back and forth and share documents, then the system works. :)

firstaborean
firstaborean

I agree entirely with Mr. Wallen, although I am by no means a Linux enthusiast. The whole point is providing an alternative that suits some, perhaps a lot of, users. Only today, I recommended Ubuntu for use by a woman of about my age (late 60's), who got an infection in her Windows-based computer while visiting Facebook, which she confesses to "love." Just about all the applications she uses are just one, a browser. She's the perfect candidate for Linux, and she's so untechnical that vacuum cleaners mystify her. Linux needs to be uncloistered, promoted to the non-technical, and factionalism needs to be dropped like a hot potato.

Elwood Diverse
Elwood Diverse

I suppose Linux is going to be declared dead now because they aren't a monolithic closed system like Apple or MS. But Linux is far more successful than either, residing on more devices, more servers, more tablets, more phones, more anything you can mention except desktops. But with the neglect of desktops by MS and Apple, I wouldn't bet against it there, either. With the growth of open formats, and the need to control costs in public services around the world, Linux may well conquer the desktop in time. I don't think anybody should be concerned about Linux fragmentation; most distributions are just different flavors of the same basic product. OSs should be boring anyway. Most work is done using apps, not OSs.

pietro
pietro

There is a very simple solution to this problem, it just baffles me why no one has thought of it before... Quote "one camp hates GNOME, another hates FOSS and Richard Stallman, and yet another hates any given piece of proprietary software that might find its way onto the, otherwise, open source desktop." Solution? Provide CHOICES when installing the OS ! For example, I don't like Unity... I just installed Gnome shell and that fixed the problem. Linux is about simple solutions and choices... Just get on with it guys, stop the BS !

gabestoian
gabestoian

Why the desperation to MAKE IT?.. What does that mean? Recognition by the industry? Linux got this far by its sheer merit of being a free IT alternative to the "ruling giants". Im surprised and in awe that it got this far and hasnt been suppressed by the "ruling giants" through some dodgy (il)legalities. Just take a look at alternative technologies in general and their (lack of) presence in mainstream society. Most of us know why that is.. Human psychology is conditioned in such a way that if a service or a product is free, it must be crap and alternatively, if expensive, it must be good - even if it happens to be crap.. What is acceptable or not is dictated by the "bottom line" and - unless humanity will suddenly change and adopt a profit-free system :-) - free products are bound to remain at the fringe. Big bro will make sure of it. In the mean time, donate to the developers! Long live Linux!

Gisabun
Gisabun

First problem with the Linux "sphere" is too many distros. Each duplicate others in some ways but add their own touches. 200+ distros easily. Too fractured. While some follow a mane distro like Ubuntu, others don't. How are driver and software manufacturers suppose to support all these variations? DEll, for example, pushes Ubuntu. Software on their site will work with [most] Ubuntu distros. Others. Probably not. Then there are the desktop issues. GNONe, etc.

cougar.b
cougar.b

Way back in the 80s, I discovered as a writer that an outliner was the only thing I would write on because of the value it gave me for using my mind productively. I used PCO, and while all my friends were switching to MSWord, I just said "No," until Word got a superior outliner function. I keep looking at alternatives, now, but neither OpenOffice nor LibreOffice have anything that takes the place of the Word outliner. I tried writing my reasons on one of the LibreOffice comment pages, and my most articulate comment was taken down--not for trolling or name-calling or any perceivable bad behavior that I'm aware of. Perhaps for saying that I'm sticking with Word until I see a good outliner. When I upgrade my computer, I'm going to download Kingsoft Office, because it appears that Kingsoft free might equal Word's outliner. (Currently, I don't have the disk space for more.) I have worked as a tech writer in the Silicon Valley, and I resent MS as much as any of the developers that I worked with. Since I've also done some programming with VB and then switched to the more appropriate open-source alternatives, I also resent MS for my own personal development reasons. I literally feel very impatient to get away from MS, and when I do, I'll be back on Linux like a fly on flypaper. So it doesn't matter to me which Linux flavor I use, so long as I can have the functionality that I need as a writer. I wish that was Open or Libra Office, but I'll go with any alternative outliner I can find. If someone from one of these open source suites wants to contact me off-line, please do so, and I'll explain exactly what I need and why. I will never go to any word processing software that doesn't serve my needs, and I know what I need from 25 years of experience with the functionality. That's why I'm still using XP.

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

Let's start off strong: good support, windows, you can't even get support except through a third, third party who doesn't really care hired by some PC maker. Bad, LInux Geeks fight over EVERYTHING! Opportunity: People hate Microsoft and their master plan to drive people onto scratch and sniff coaster sized devices and pay per use like cable. People especially hate that one size fits all boat anchor of an operating system aka windows 8. Some bean counter in the evil empire who decided that abortion of a GUI that may (I repeat may) work with tablets should be taken out and shot. Apple has become the go to for tablets etc. So Linux could replace both Microsoft and Apple on the desktop and laptop while these two idiot child corporations fight over tablets, (a dead end niche market at best) and all the other junk out there. Let's face it even Linux users are bailing on Ubuntu and Unity for Mint because of these idiotic GUIs. PUT THEM ON TABLETS and leave the PC/Laptop interface alone.

Tremina4456
Tremina4456

Jobk3.?om JENNIFER...go there for the work at home job. My uncle makes $15.50 hourly working from home doing easy typing stuff and loves it. No experience needed.

lord_beavis
lord_beavis

What they thought was keeping Linux from being successful on the desktop and they said, "What's Linux?" Kidding. He said he thought is was because Linux still relied to much on the command line to get anything done. I use the command line a lot admining Windows servers and some workstations so I told him that his statement was unfounded.

mortel
mortel

Sure there are a vocal few who "hate" something or other. Doesn't seem all that significant to me. Screen out the good natured competitive back-and-forth of who's distro. is better than whose and you get some legitimate disagreements on what is the best approach to take, e.g., pure FOSS, optimized performance, ease of transition from Widows for desktop users, etc. The way I see it, the raw power of the current situation is that everyone is free to follow the path they value the most. Many paths are fruitful enough to develop to maturity, and that is a very good thing. Any bickering pales by comparison.

The_Real_BSAFH
The_Real_BSAFH

I must be one of the 4 people that use Slack (including Pat and Eric) in the world. If more people used it, there would be more compute literate users in the world. MS's day is coming.

Duke E Love
Duke E Love

I dislike fr33t4rds and slashdot karma wh0res with a passion. They can be some of the most of arrogant, herdish, narrow minded, prejudiced bigots to have ever walked the planet. I have been using Linux for close to 15 years and am active in several open source projects and communities and I cannot stand some of my geek brethren. I am often on the verge of saying "give it a rest will ya?" when dealing with some of the folks. The moment someone uses words like M$, Micro$oft, windoze or windohs I think "that person is an idiot" and from that moment onward I really cannot take them seriously.

ejv
ejv

This old argument again? Nice troll. Linux is doing pretty good methinks. Must be a slow news week.

blaineclrk
blaineclrk

Chris Meissen, your story mirrors mine almost exactly. I got tired of constantly repairing my relatively new at that time XP after every major update and jumped ship to try a few Linux flavors. I too settled on Ubuntu and after about a month, my wife decided she liked what she saw me working with, instead of on, and wanted it too since she was also having occasional though minor trouble with her desktop. When Ubuntu started with the Unity flavor, we both switched to Mint. I don't hate Ubuntu, I just prefer Mint now. When any friends are curious I still recommend that they try Ubuntu, Mint and a couple others. Where did all the cry about 'freedom of choice' go?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

and typical Windows users don't admin servers. Since they don't they're likely as unfamiliar with the CLI in Windows as they would be in Linux. I don't think a desktop Linux user would have to use the CLI more than a desktop Windows user, but I expect both would be significantly less comfortable using it than an server or infrastructure admin.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Just not on the desktop. There are plenty of areas where Linux is a hit - servers, single-purpose devices, etc. "And by the time you have a viable mobile solution..." There's already a viable mobile solution: Android.

Brainstorms
Brainstorms

".. the more options there are the more work it takes to get the job done" equals ".. the more options there are for a car model, the harder it is to drive". "Good luck to Linux, but you are still setting up the car" -- And what is MS doing with Windows 8? "... still infighting about the best desktop. Please..." Yeah. "... will never be Linux on desk top, or even Linux mobile". Oops, it's 2013 now, not 2003. Your 10-year-old prediction turned out to be wrong.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

That choice of Ubuntu for an appliance user came out of a mass of work by all sorts of people with very different goals. If linux had started with that goal in mind, we wouldn't be having this discussion.

SubgeniusD
SubgeniusD

but not always ideal in every circumstance. It's been probably 5 years since I last fooled around installing and trying various DTEs on a different distros because there were always stability and usage quirks. A well-designed distro built around a hardcoded desktop environment is always superior to simply dropping a shell on top of one in my experience.

Brainstorms
Brainstorms

Easy: The underlying kernel is THE SAME. And the GNU "user space" of the OS wrapping the kernel is basically the same, too. What the driver manufacturers do is create a driver that goes into the kernel. At that point ALL the distros have it. Same with the software manufacturers. The difference between distros is largely cosmetic, not structural, not a compatibility issue, and does NOT require a custom version for each distro. For example, I can install a USB3 board in my system and download a (complex) application such as VirtualBox to my machine. They work. I can then install a different desktop and nothing changes -- no re-installs, etc. needed. I can install a completely different distro, yet my hardware still has a driver (it's in the kernel, which is common to both distros), and I can install Vbox -- and it still works. There is no "problem" of having too many distros. It's a smoke screen. It's akin to having "too many trim levels" on a popular model of automobile, and claiming that your mechanic can work on the sedan but not the coupe... or that your aftermarket radio will work in the convertible but could never function in the station wagon version. These aren't the issues you're looking for. You can go about your business. Move along...

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

so he rarely sees that Windows command prompt. I agree with you that users of consumer grade Linux aren't into the command line any more often than Windows users, but your point fell apart when you cited administering servers.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"If more people used it, there would be more compute literate users in the world." And if more people spent time under the hood of their cars, there'd be more mechanically literate people. If they spent more time in the kitchen, they'd be better cooks. If they spent more time in the garden, their food would be fresher. Most people want to use a computer and don't care how it works.

lord_beavis
lord_beavis

Yes, the average user on either OS will more than likely never see a command line (unless they chose Slackware :) ), but I do rely on it on all systems for some of those extra "features". God help me, I still write batch files...

CharlesG1970
CharlesG1970

Well then what is all the hoopla over. Ubuto mobile, GNOME etc. all your distributions you have finally suceeded in making a vialble Linux in Android. Oh wait, that was the Open hand set aliancen and Google that made Android. I know it is based on the Linux Kernel, but then they made the Android Kernal, and built a vialble system. If it helps you sleep or feel good then go ahead and believe that Linux is now sucessful because someone forked it and suceeded. The reality is that Linux will nto be commercailly sucessfull in either Desktop or Mobile. But it has and will continue to be a learning space and development space for others to build on. Thank you I love my Android phone and Tablets but I have no interest running any flavour of Linux other than the Google flavour. Cheers

CharlesG1970
CharlesG1970

Yes that is exactly right. If you get the automatic transmission it shifts the way Chevrolet say it should shift. (May be; good, bad or indifferent). If you want the Manual transmission, you get more power to the wheels, better control of power application, (down shift into a ramp etc.) Now you can say it is easy to learn to drive stick and get those advantages and you would be right, but most cars (North American sales) are automatic. I am a driving geek and choose to improve my driving by utilizing a manual transmission. It is more difficult to drive, but gives me advantages. I am very good at drivign stick (IMO), but on the long boring moring commute there are days I long for the ease of an automatic. Linux is the same, if you what the Auto transmission you get an Apple, if you want the paddle shifters to override the default get the M$ systems (Win 8 hatters aside), if you want full control get Linux. As I said before, there is no question Linux is better in almost every measurable way, but most people just want to get to work or the store and home again, so they buy the Apples and M$ PCs, and will continue to do so.

CharlesG1970
CharlesG1970

Linux is available on both Desktop and Mobile, in both distro versions, and commercial version from Dell and a few others, but that is not commercially sucessfull. That is Dell recognising a niche market and charging you extra for somethign you can get for free. Linux will always be a learing space and niche market ONLY. Servers are certainly a different situarion and I woudl say Linux is very sucessfuyll in that space, but this artical was about Desktops/laptops, and to some extent mobile.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"What the driver manufacturers do is create a driver that goes into the kernel. At that point ALL the distros have it. Same with the software manufacturers." Assuming that code is open source. Otherwise some distros will exclude it on philosophical grounds.

SubgeniusD
SubgeniusD

Oversimplified. Different package managers and file structures for instance make various distros distinctly different with lots of incompatibilities. More importantly, inadequate coding, packaging and testing crews stall release cycles. I know it's like herding cats but if more technical folks cooperated on a handful of major (not the niche specialization) distros instead of duplicating efforts all over the place it would greatly accelerate the quality of choices available. There would still be plenty of CHOICE. I really wish FOSS enthusiasts would stop throwing the CHOICE word at the basic chokepoint stalling the growth of Linux - fragmentation. That's not addressing the issue - that's changing the subject.

tbmay
tbmay

...makes it just as much "Linux" as Ubuntu Red Hat or Debian. They are all distributions of software that run on top of a Linux kernel. The point is fanboys don't seem to understand either what the public wants (what they are familiar with) or what open source developers want (lots and lots of different things because there are lots of them). Neither of these groups care about making "Linux" a market dominant platform. Evangelists promote ignorance, confusion, or disregard, depending on the source, of the fact that "Linux" is a component in a software stack, not a complete solution. That said, there is a toolset in unixland that makes the software very useful.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I don't care if it succeeds or not. I don't use it and haven't looked at it for three or four years. I don't know what all the hoopla is. All I know is that Android is quite popular on phones and tablets. I would think adding that to the success in other areas would be enough for its advocates to put up some 'Mission Accomplished' banners and call it a victory. Apparently some have determined that isn't enough. If I was sleeping with eight girls out of ten, I wouldn't worry about the other two, but apparently it's important to nail all of them. I wouldn't say it won't be commercially successful on desktops, eventually, but I agree that it isn't worth the entire community dedicating itself to that goal.

Slayer_
Slayer_

It makes all of his blogs pointless. He is just championing Ubuntu, as always.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Android has already surpassed iOS. Oh, and Android, iOS, MacOS, are all Linux and BSD systems. I guess you didn't know that.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Let those distros remain niche and obscure.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

and think that one distro will help achieve it. I don't even know why they want it in the first place.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

" I'm hoping for something like 5 - 8%. You know - enough for equipment manufacturers, game and other software producers, ISPs, OEMs and vendors of all sorts to view the Linux DT market as a worthwhile sideline for their products and services." I think Apple has that sort of market share but it still isn't targeted by many peripheral or software vendors.

SubgeniusD
SubgeniusD

I have no illusions about desktop Linux ever achieving anything close to "market dominance". I'm hoping for something like 5 - 8%. You know - enough for equipment manufacturers, game and other software producers, ISPs, OEMs and vendors of all sorts to view the Linux DT market as a worthwhile sideline for their products and services. No more HCLs (hardware compatibility lists) to check for printers etc. No more help desk calls trying to get routers online. How about uniting behind ohh let's say - OpenSuse, Ubuntu, Mint, PCLinuxOS, Mageia, Sabayon, Slackware - there ya go - look at all that CHOICE!! Even a modestly tech savvy user would wonder why you'd need all those CHOICES to watch YouTube, write term papers, edit photos and send emails. I'd say because CHOICE is good and competition drives innovation. But to jump from there to this manic "more is always better and enough is never enough" mentality is impeding the whole aim of expanding the Linux DT user base.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

We have CHOICE now, what you seem to be saying is to achieve market dominance we need to reduce effectively unlimited choice, to down to just a few. Worse still you are saying those choices are to be defined by those people who do not contribute to their execution. The end result of market dominance is never quality, to get quality you need competition.