Microsoft

A tool running in Windows can save data lost in Linux

Recovering data from a hard drive with a corrupted partition table created by Linux is not something you do every day. However, DiskInternals makes a tool, which runs under Windows, called Linux Reader that can recover your data. Jack Wallen shows you how to install, configure, and use this tool.

Recovering data from a hard drive with a corrupted partition table created by Linux is not something you do every day. However, DiskInternals makes a tool, which runs under Windows, called Linux Reader that can recover your data. Jack Wallen shows you how to install, configure, and use this tool in this How do I entry in the Windows blog.

The nice thing about this tool is it does not allow you to write to the ext2 or ext3 partitions. It only allows read access. This is crucial in keeping your data from being overwritten or completely lost (without the help of high-cost, third-party solutions.) Another nice thing about this tool is it has very low system requirements:

  • Windows 9x/ME/NT4.0/2000/XP/2003/Vista
  • At least 16 MB of RAM
  • Free disk space for recovered files

For more details check out the How do I article in the Windows blog.

About

Mark W. Kaelin has been writing and editing stories about the IT industry, gadgets, finance, accounting, and tech-life for more than 25 years. Most recently, he has been a regular contributor to BreakingModern.com, aNewDomain.net, and TechRepublic.

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