Broadband

All major Linux distros compliant with IPv6 mandates

In the ramped efforts for organizations to meet the qualifications for IPv6-compliant technology, the Linux Foundation declares that all major Linux distributions now meet the U.S. DoD's certification standards.

Network Administrator Michael Kassner has covered IPv6 in detail in his series on what to do to prepare for the IPv6 upgrade. If you are wondering what that means to the Linux community, Ars Technica reports that all major Linux distros now comply with the Department of Defense (DoD, U.S.) certification policies. One of the main things that the IPv6 move will do is boost the number of available IP addresses that can be used on the Internet.

Linux has had relatively robust IPv6 support since 2005, but further work was needed for for the open source platform to achieve full compliance with DoD standards. The Linux Foundation's IPv6 workgroup analyzed the DoD certification requirements and identified key areas where Linux's IPv6 stack needed adjustments in order to guarantee compliance. They collaboratively filled in the gaps and have succeeded in bringing the shared technology into alignment with the DoD's standards.

One major player in the Linux compliance efforts was IBM; the collaboration also included the IPv6 Workgroup of the Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Novell, Nokia, and other major Linux stakeholders.

"The IPv6 mandate and ensuing requirements are such major undertakings that it makes it difficult for any one company to deal with it all on its own," said Linux Foundation director Jim Zemlin in a statement. "This is exactly the kind of work and collaboration that the Linux Foundation can facilitate, and which results in real technology advancements for the Linux operating system."

About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

9 comments
jprigot
jprigot

Please don't let this be a repeat of OSI networking. It was supposed to be the Next Great Hope for the Internet which was running out of addresses. I wasted a year transitioning our machines to it, only to see it fade away.

seanferd
seanferd

It's good to know that major distros are DoD compliant. I wouldn't be surprised if many were more than compliant, where that is possible.

jlwallen
jlwallen

considering UNIX and Linux were years ahead of most other operating systems on 64bit....much to the communities surprise, UNIX and Linux tends to be ahead of the curve when it comes to issues like this.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Any connected device in the last four or more years now has ipv6 support and probably turned on by default. IPv6 is also being used nationally for Internet in places like Japan also. It's already here and It's already the standard in use in places. We'll have to see how it actually goes but I think those two points alone make this different from the OSI attempt. Mind you, I don't remember the OSI change so I'm mostly guessing here. With on-by-default; I'm glad one of my router firmware's current bugs is broken IPv6 so the outside world still has to get in through firewalled IPv4.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Not that I'd considered it until Selena's posting but it's not at all surprising. First to fully support usb and usb2 First to fully support bluetooth (still need special drivers for same BT radio under Windows) First to fully support 64bit (hurray for good software design allowing a simple recompile against 64bit libraries) I've been seeing notices about IPv6 in my Linux boot messages since 2007 (well, Dec 2006 for Mandriva 2007.0). Development and evolution are fun when not intentionally hindered by infighting among the ecosystem members over things that should be industry standards.

dwdino
dwdino

...they still don't handle wireless, laptops, or multiple montiors well... hmmm... ahead of the curve indeed.

Jaqui
Jaqui

it isn't surprising.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

USB, Bluetooth, 64bit, ipv6 Those are all pretty major and critical things across the system. I do wish there was more interest in the usual celebrity suspects though. wireless - ask the vendors why they require a closed blob firmware or can't provide industry standard driver interfaces infront of them. Where interface specs or company culture permits, support for wireless is very good but it won't be perfect until NDISwrapper is no longer needed. laptops - I'm guessing this primarily means sleep/hibernate modes and better suppor there would be fantastic. sleep to ram (sleep) seems to work across the board these days but sleep to disk (hibernate) still has some issues that could easily be overcome. The usual array of special keys on laptops can also be a bit of grief though my Thinkpad keys mostly work through the bios so there is not much issue and the missing keys are not hard to map by hand though Eject is usually the only one I bother with. multiple monitors - I think this has more to do with the company cultures at Nvidia and AMD/ATI. I'd love to see dual-header setup easy on all platforms personally though; even Windows requires a third party utility to truly work right as a dual rig. I'll add in a project quickly returning to the top of my own list now that some other more critical things are taken care of (Mushkin ram, F'ing great stuff after six months of crashing against Crucial chips). I'd like to see the various related project developers make working with Hauppauge easier. Before I had to put that project on hold, I was down to trying prepackaged MythTV installs but non where offered as liveCD and I wasn't willing to do a full install just to confirm harware functionality. I'd hold Linux more responsible for those celebrity issues if it was the fault of the kernel developers. I'd hold the distro maintainers responsible if it was not an issue for most distributions. Really, these things could be fixed very quickly if a few political roadblocks where removed. Here's hoping things like Cononical sponsoring media codecs continue to help.

Editor's Picks