Windows

Fedora Core 10 might make me a believer again

After a long hiatus from Fedora, Jack Wallen has returned to test the Red Hat waters again. Do you think Fedora 10 can bring Jack back? Read his take to see if Fedora finally got Linux right again.

For a long time I was a wearer of the Fedora. Starting with Red Hat 4.2, all the way to 8 and then adopting Fedora when Red Hat when corporate, I was a proud user of all things Fedora. But then something happened and I lost my taste for the research triangle and we parted ways. I found Ubuntu, which marked the end of an era.

And I tried to pick up where Fedora and I left off. I gave 7, 8, and 9 a try, only to become disappointed on a number of levels. The yum system seemed to spend more time broken than not. The GNOME desktop was little more than a joke, and usb was impossible. I had pretty much written off ever using Fedora again -- that is -- until 10.

Recently, I decided I couldn't stand trying to make Vista work well on my laptop, and I had to make it dual boot (I had to keep Vista so I could continue to write about the things that DID actually work in this quirky-at-best OS). Naturally I went for my favorite Ubuntu 8.10, but for some reason the installer didn't like the fact that Vista was present on the hard disk. After that I went for my next favorite, Mandriva. Mandriva installed well but the wireless card wouldn't work (even though it DID work during the Mandriva LiveCD session - odd that.) With those two down, I reached for a recently burned copy of Fedora 10. I thought, "What the hey - it couldn't perform any worse than the other two on this odd little Sony Vaio." I inserted the CD and crossed my fingers.

The LiveCD session looked good. I have to say the default background is stunning (I know, there I go again talking about backgrounds!). Wireless worked great. Sound was working. If the install completed as smoothly as the LiveCD ran, Fedora 10 might wind up having a home on my laptop along side Vista.

Well, the install finished and I logged in. To my surprise, everything (and I mean everything) worked. On top of everything working, Fedora 10 was outperforming Vista hands down. Boot is faster, graphics are faster, every thing runs far more smoothly.

And one of the biggest surprises (and this might send Jaqui into apoplectic fits) is that GNOME 2.24 is actually a usable desktop! Sure I tweaked it a bit, but I would have to say that GNOME 2.24 is a far better desktop than KDE 4.x.

This whole experience has really taken me by surprise. I had written off Fedora, but now I believe I have found a renewed friendship and can proudly don my hat again.

To all the developers at Fedora and Red Hat, I tip my, well, hat to you. You have made me a believer again.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

32 comments
kiotti
kiotti

I installed FC10 on a new hard-drive and I have Vista on a separate hard-drive. I decided to have FC10 as the primary disc and to my surprise when I went to the option of Other on the boot loader, it actually booted my hd w/ vista. Plus the ability to read/write to ntfs is beautiful.

seth.mh
seth.mh

back in 1997 people was saying that Linux would dominate , well , here in 2008 it is yet to dominate

ccbasubas
ccbasubas

the evidence is clear that almost 70% to 80% of worlds server which is connected/serving on the internet are running on linux...

jlwallen
jlwallen

that vista would be an improvement over XP. was it? not at all.

wdewey@cityofsalem.net
wdewey@cityofsalem.net

Thanks for wasting my time with your post. Please don't contribute if you don't have anything useful to add. Bill

martian
martian

that you started out with a SONY POS in the first place. I hope you didn't spend $ on that.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'm sure we all gained much from sharing your wisdom. For example, I learned to ignore any of your future posts.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

did you have something to actually contribute?

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

him being an illegal alien and all, he doesn't know any better.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

Besides the hassle. Can't wait for the semester to end. Tomorrow is it. Then get grades out by Sunday night. I'm finished with school until about the third week of January. Wish I'd hit the freaking lottery. I'd be finished with a lot of things... :D

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

How ya doin? After 5 friggin hassle days getting my computer up and running it is finally working again -- YAY now I gotta shut down and actually put it back together though.

eclypse
eclypse

Fedora Core 9 had to be the worst piece of crap I've ever seen - and it was a real disappointment, too. I've been using Red Hat since the 4.2 days and I've never had a release that was so crappy as 9 - I would swear that it was still beta software. It was crappy enough to make me try OpenSUSE 11 - a step up, but not as far up as I'd hoped... Maybe I will get a chance to try FC10 over the Holiday...

roy.evison
roy.evison

Not had the pleasure yet but I am curious, does it have a 'wizard' to create a bootable usb pendrive with a small linux o/s on it? Roy.

jlwallen
jlwallen

there is a tool called UNetbootin that does that. it's amazing and simple to use.

roy.evison
roy.evison

I have heard of this have it from 'Linux Format' that once completed you cannot record on said USB system. Roy.

wa7qzr
wa7qzr

Well, for me, I'm sick of the damnable upgrades (which are really fresh installs - Fedora don't do upgrades)! Computers are supposed to be useful. Why then, do we have to make most of that usage being installing the next version, and reinstalling all our personal stuff? By the time we're finished, comfortable, and able to go back to performing other useful tasks, it's time for another upgrade. I tried the LiveCD and browsed the Fedora site. What I saw there made me throw my hands up in disgust. Now that they have made Fedora 10 and official release, they were setting their eyes on Fedora 11! When that's released, they will, no doubt, be aching to begin on Fedora 12! Seems to me that an os version should last longer than a year or so. I want my computer-use-life to be consumed with useful tasks and projects, not consumed with installing updates and fixing my stuff to work with new version releases. Is it really necessary to abandon older releases, just because they are older? Adopt backwards compatibility (within reason, of course: RH5 is asking for too much) and don't cause users to regret their stepping away from Redmond, only to be swallowed up in a morass of upgrades and installs that break and make obsolete what they need to make their computers their tools, instead of their taskmasters.

jkaiserling
jkaiserling

To shine a different light on the upgrade subject, I wish to share my computer household. It is to show that you do NOT have to re-install a new version of Fedora every time one is released. I have an old HP Omnibook 900b that cannot handle the new version of Fedora or any new Linux distro. It runs perfectly on Fedora Core 6 and stays there. There still are the security updates once in a blue moon, but otherwise, it is useful and does all that you would want from this laptop. My main desktop, as well as my wife's, are on Fedora 9. It has "matured" and things are humming with these units. I have a spare computer running Fedora 10 on it to see if the changes are worth updating the others 2 computers to...such as the re-writing of PulseAudio (and for my uses, it is). My wife is having no problems with her use of Fedora 9 and so she will not upgrade from here. I need the changed PulseAudio for my multi-sound source environment, so mine goes up. Oh yes, my "work" laptop needs reliability to the n'th degree...it is and will stay on Fedora 8...solid for its needs. It is all what you make of it. No one in the Fedora community forces you to upgrade if you feel all is set and working for you. I was originally an Ubuntu user, but got frustrated that there would come a time when your distro was truly obsolete and you HAD to upgrade.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"Now that they have made Fedora 10 and official release, they were setting their eyes on Fedora 11! When that's released, they will, no doubt, be aching to begin on Fedora 12! Seems to me that an os version should last longer than a year or so." You're under no obligation to upgrade your system just because a new version of the OS is released. This applies regardless of your OS. If it still does what you need, and can support the hardware and applications you run, don't upgrade. Millions of people happily run Windows 2000 and Office 97.

vmaatta
vmaatta

.. Upgrading is also not required to get updates to system components or apps.

vmaatta
vmaatta

Linux OSs upgrade to new versions much more frequently than i.e. Windows. They also have updates through the package management for all kinds of parts of the OS and apps running on it. Upgrading and updating certainly doesn't have to mean re-installing the OS and/or loosing data, or re-installing the applications you use. With regards to FC10 I suggest you take a look at: http://docs.fedoraproject.org/install-guide/f10/ http://docs.fedoraproject.org/install-guide/f10/en_US/ch-upgrading-system.html

kdziegiel
kdziegiel

I downloaded and burned CD's DVD and live. Can't get it to install on desktop but works well on lap top. I tried everything. So I installed fedora 9.

papeirce
papeirce

I have an "old" IBM T-40 with MS Windows XP (Yes, Pre Lenovo machine). I recently experienced a nasty HDD issue, and went into never ending restarts, not to mention a bad DIMM. An older Laptop with a broken LCD display (thanks to my 20 year old son the clutz) had an equivalent DIMM and a 40GB HDD to replace the IBM's 40GB HDD. Trouble with this hardware fix is no OS. All I had was the recovery Partition on the bad drive. Sadness was not to over take me but it's cousin, frustration tried. I've been a Linux Enthusiast for 10 years but jumped in solidly with RedHat 6.2 for my Sun Sparcstation 10 with 6GB of SCSI Drives, 128MB RAM and (sadly) only an SM31 Processor. Without delving more into my Linux History, I tried several distributions and itterations, but the only one to recognise both the IBM Internal WiFi hardware, but also, my Orinoco Gold a/b/g PCMCIA card right out of the box, was Fedora Core 10. No additional research or recompiles needed. The only thing I need now is a package to recognise the fact that I don't have a CD Burner, but a CD Burner/DVD-ROM. Oh, and there are also no formatting issues as yet between MS Office documents/presentations/spreadsheets and those of OpenOffice.org 3. Yes... I am quite happy and fairly impressed. I now, once again, Proudly wear the Red Fedora that RedHat Staff gave me for my birthday back in 2001...! Schah-weet...

cjc5447
cjc5447

The problem is the main function of operating system is to run applications, everything else in the OS just supports that function. Yes, it all has to work (like networking, USB, etc.) to make the OS functional, but if your apps don't run on that platform, it's worthless. Jack and others may get along fine with Linux, but lots of people have Windows apps (mostly closed source) that represent a substantial investment. Even if I wanted to I couldn't port my Windows apps to Linux. There may be open source alternative, but they not work the same or may require substantial retraining. Also your data may not move with you. So most of us are stuck with Windows. Note I have two servers, one running SuSE 11.0 and the other running FreeBSD 7.0, so I'm not against open source.

andy
andy

There is very little Windows software that doesn't have an open source equivalent that is as good as or better, so the real value of one's investment in Windows software is a lot less than you may think. The argument that your data may not be able to with you to Linux is limited to a few rare cases. For most desktop users, the real value of their Windows software investment and data portability issues is 0 + 0. Substantial retraining - baloney. The alternative, of course, is to continue to pour one's cash into the black hole of Windows software planned obsolescence. My business customers celebrate the day they were converted to Linux and run it on their laptops, desktops and home computers.

kgunnIT
kgunnIT

With release of Vista, and Office 2007, now is as good a time than any to switch to linux. Think about it... Vista is completely redesigned, everything looks different on Vista, and for some, not as easily to find. So, instead of retraining on Vista, why not train on Linux. MS Office 2007, GUI is redesigned, again, nothing is where it used to be....why not train users on OpenOffice instead of teaching them Office 2007. The biggest reason users don't switch is because they claim their programs aren't available on linux...which is simply not true. Sure the Windows version may not be available, but there is generally an open-source alternative. If not, one could always try WINE, which has made some progress in the past few years and has added a lot more programs to their support base. I have Fedora 10 on my desktop, runs great! I also have Parallels on my MacBook which I am running gOS for now, a very light-weight linux OS.

V
V

I'm still using F8 respin. I don't like being a beta tester, I want stability. Fedora 9 had too many issues with security policies. Stay 1 step behind the latest version, by the time the new version is released, all the issues for the previous version have been sorted. Choose the Unity respins, if you want a stress-free experience.

rhomp2002
rhomp2002

With the latest release of Fedora, there was an update put out there that screwed up Fedora completely. Cannot update and cannot use Thunderbird either. A bug report was put on Bugzilla about this and apparently it affects Fedora 9 as well as Fedora 10. The bug is marked as closed/next release whatever that means. Total disaster. The bug report says you can do a CLI update but then those who tried say that does not work either. Then there was supposedly a correction that fixed Fedora 10 32-bit but that does not help those who had Fedora 9 or Fedora 10 64-bit. A suggestion was made to just pull the update but apparently that is a no go because the update changed things that just pulling it won't fix the problem. I am with hartley.ra on this one. I want stability. With the other distros I have tried if there was a problem it was fixed in a day at most. This has gone on now for over 5 days and there are in excess of 75 comments on the Bugzilla. That does not sound promising to me. I will go elsewhere for now. If they get this one fixed, then we will see but I don't like the looks of it.

Jaqui
Jaqui

naw, I don't install GNOME cause it's as ugly as macos. :p and the new reliance on the .net framework is an absolute no-go, just like java. [ which is another reason I have not looked at, nor do I plan on it, KDE 4. ] to top it off, all RH products are off my list, because they default to gnome. The last RH release I looked at was RHL 8.3

hilbert70
hilbert70

I used Red Had from version 5.1 used Suse once, but that lasted a month. Used all Fedora version but as of 10 I think I will be switching to Ububtu for the desktop, will use CentOS 5.2 on my server. Why stop using Fedora Core 10? Pulse audio and OSS4, it seems that the Fedora people did compile gnome without oss support, so they denined me the choice of switching to OSS. I installed Ubunti 8.10 and it just works, mp3 no problem, nvidia driver no problem. Overall no problems only that I need to learn the Debian wway of package management, but that wont be that big a hurdle. Regards, Hilbert

Editor's Picks