Banking

GnuCash COULD be a QuickBooks killer

Jack Wallen has to regularly deal with the shortcomings of Quickbooks. In this open source blog entry he proposes the features that GnuCash needs to become that infamous Quickbooks killer. Is it possible?

I am a certified QuickBooks technician. And, to be perfectly honest, QuickBooks stinks. When it works it's great...but when it doesn't work, it's a NIGHTMARE! It's terribly sensitive to network hiccups, it isn't smart enough to switch itself out of single user mode after a scheduled backup, it's slow, it constantly can not find data files, it's expensive...the list goes on and on. And I hear these complaints nearly every day. Along with those complaints comes the question: "Do you know of an alternative?" The answer to that question is always, unfortunately, "No."

I want to be able to tell clients "Why yes, I do know of an alternative that is easy to use, reliable, and open source!" Unfortunately I can not. I want that alternative to be GnuCash, but it isn't. As good as GnuCash is (and I've been using it daily for a long, long time) it can not stand up to what QuickBooks users need. GnuCash has no multi-user mode. GnuCash has no server capabilities. GnuCash does not have a user-friendly GUI that contains one-click buttons to access nearly ever feature it offers.

Nope. As good as GnuCash is, it's not what the business public wants. It should be, but it's not. And that's a shame because GnuCash is one of the few fully cross-platform accounting packages that can handle nearly every accounting need of either an individual user or a business. But it lacks too many key elements to be adopted across the board.

So...I thought I would fill in the blanks so that anyone who has the developer chops could pick up the open source GnuCash and roll up what could easily be a QuickBooks killer. Here's what GnuCash needs:

Multi-user capability: With GnuCash you can have multiple users, but each user has to have their own data file. Or you can have multiple users opening up the same data file, but not concurrently. GnuCash is a one-at-a-time tool. I realize this feature alone would take either a team of developers or an incredibly talented individual to pull off. But I know there are some brilliant open source developers out there who could add this feature. Backend server: Right now the closest you can come to this is sharing the data file out with Samba. But when you do that you are going to come across Samba's widely inconsistent file-locking issues. And when you're dealing with finances, you do NOT want those kind of mistakes haunting you. This feature couldn't be all that hard - once the multi-user feature was added. But until multi-user is in place, the backend server is not going to happen. Better home screen: If anything, Intuit did get the home screen right with Quickbooks. From that screen users can quickly click on a button to open up the feature they want. No need for menus. It's quick, it's elegant, and very user-friendly. Although GnuCash does have a fairly user-friendly interface, it's going to need to fall in line with that Quickbooks does if it wants to attract the type of users who make up the bulk of the QuickBooks community. You know the type. Tax software integration: This one is tough, because there are no Linux solutions for taxes. However, it would be helpful if GnuCash could at least calculate the numbers that can then be entered into tax software. I realize this isn't the easiest as tax laws change year to year. It's too bad the government hasn't become nearly as transparent as they promised. Had they pulled that off, tax law could be as simple as downloading a specific, open format, file and then importing it into the software. Not going to happen in the near future, that's for sure.

That's really it. With the above four features GnuCash could easily take down QuickBooks as the leading financial software. And better yet, it would give Linux yet another boost. This could happen. All it would take is a bit of thought and project management on the GnuCash developer's part. Either that or a "QuickBooks-like fork" of GnuCash which could integrate those features.

I would love to some day be able to tell clients, "Why yes, I do know of an option that you will find much more reliable and far cheaper!" Slap that data file server on a Linux machine and have some seriously happy customers.

There are days I wish I would have continued studying programming so I could follow through with all of the projects that have come into my head over the years. But I didn't. So instead I am content offering up ideas to developers and hope that some day I will offer up one that will stick and help to enrich the open source community. But then...on the GnuCash front - I'm sure I am not the first who has suggested these very same features.

What do you think? Could GnuCash become a QuickBooks killer?

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

66 comments
JCannuk
JCannuk

With the exception of income tax, MYOB/Account Edge (Mac/PC) is a very good alternative to QB. Its easy to setup and to backup. It has a slightly better user interface and you can easily access the GJ unlike QB. Forget about using any of Sage's products they are very cumbersome, not user friendly and resource hungry.

dcartford
dcartford

There are plenty of free accounting software available in the net. The problem is, picking the right one that suits your needs. TurboCash, accountingdes are some that can compete with Quickbooks

MrsBryant8
MrsBryant8

Hey Jack, I used to be an accounting database programmer. Does anyone remember Sensible Solutions which became O'Hanlon Database Solutions which became System 4? I have no idea where it is now. I am now a QuickBooks ProAdvisor who has to provide workarounds for QuickBooks lack of built-in functions like Retainers, Prepayments, & Gift Cards etc. The thing that keeps QuickBooks in business is its extensive User Community and Write-ups by gurus like Michelle Long. Updates don't deal with the basic package like not being able to fix a transaction that you've reconciled (you have to undo every reconciliation back to it and redo them all) or converting a tax payment by check to a Liability payment. I would love to be on an open source development team to create something from scratch (I was on the team that created the best home health care package ever (a three year project)but one month before final release in April 1987 the management, board of directors, and investors had a back stabbing & lying session and it was dropped and we all lost our jobs. I felt bad for the home health community because it was such a well rounded product. There never has been anything as good since. The agencies that were using it just kept using it for as long as they could keep it running without support. I hate politics in Business! I love the beauty of what you are creating and supporting in its purest sense. What language would you use? I used a fourth generation language specifically designed for accounting software (but destroyed when Warren Avis of Avis car rentals bought it to shelve for a loss company - did I say I hate politics in software applications?!!) With that language you could make customizations in minutes. I created (pre windows version) a time entry program with engineering tasks and double sign-offs in less than 60 days and it was push button and looked like a windows app. What software is like that in today's app development? Anyone else want to start something? Sorry this is so long, I guess I've kept it bottled up. Did I say how much I hate politics in app dev?! I guess that is why I started my own business, Empirical Consulting. No politics - just hard work and happy customers. ---- Melissa Bryant

Woody Goode
Woody Goode

Jack, I'll give you two thumbs-up for one of the most elegant analyses/wishlists of GnuCash I've seen. No denial-- none of the "well, it's mostly pretty good, sorta", or "If you don't object to performing elaborate contortions you can make this work" that I used to encounter back in my Atari/Apple days and have now come to expect from the *nix crowd. Just a hard, uncompromising look at the issues that would freak out a business. I'll even chime in with a suggestion. Now that high-speed internet is pretty much ubiquitous, I don't see any value (unless you live in dial-up) country in buying "out of the box" tax software. At minimum, you'll have to do at least one mega-download to update it. If I were a Linux finance/payroll program, I wouldn't try to port over a program that has to be rewritten every year. I'd try to link to the online versoions of the programs. Something like: 1. Open a secure, encrypted tunnel to a gateway site for all the different websites of major tax preparation providers (I think there are five). 2. Let you walk through demos and select one. 3. After you pick one and make payment, handshake with the online version and let you dump from there. The goal would be to do as little as possible within the program-- just to provide a secure front-end with data gateway to whatever vendor you like. This way, the providers merely have to be able to process a GnuCash file transfer. It's been a while since I did any work in the finance sector, so I'm sure there are legal issues that I'm blithely glossing over. But for a program that is only going to be used once (at least for home users or business, you only file once-- accounting firms are something else), there's no reason even to invent the wheel, much less re-invent it.

pmwork1
pmwork1

YE YE I am in Australia and use Quicken, there has been a major bug in its reporting facility for one of the tax reports for two or three years now. The local support people refuse to acknowledge this and do anything about it. As a consequence there are thousands of people producing reports for the tax department which are not correct and they risk legal consequences. I like many people have used this for many years. Any change would require complete transferral of my Quicken files across. Real GnuCash do this?

mwclarke1
mwclarke1

As for a back end server, we need either a very lightweight built-in database, probably flat file for simple usage to also include an option to tie into any major including open source database on the back end. for Tax software integration, I would rather have it as a separate adjunct application. One whereas could export the data into or maybe grab the data through a standard API from the database. This way as Tax software changes for each year, including add on modules for state and local taxes, sales tax, etc could be all updated without major updates to the accounting part (GNUCash). Also would allow the ability to use other programs as came available. Who knows, maybe can run GNUCash as the accounting application and tie in one of the other tax software application programs just to handle taxes, or export to an on-line tax processing center, etc.

parnote
parnote

I'm quite surprised that no one has created a tax software package based on Java. It would require one version for all platforms, including Linux. Whomever decides to create a Java based tax software will certainly lock up the entire Linux market, and will most likely replace the current leaders in the tax software market, since it will be a cross-platform solution.

Justin James
Justin James

A few years ago, I did a ton of research and ended up using Microsoft Money for my personal finances. Great application. Less expensive that Quicken, none of the awful policies around upgrades, and much, much better and easier to use! And then one day I got an email from Microsoft telling me that they were bowing out of that market, and oh, here's a $10 coupon for Quicken. I'm not sure if anyone can beat the Quicken/Quickbooks juggernaut or even slow them in their tracks. Their applications stink, their policies are exploitive of customers, and no one actually loves their software, they use it because they have to. You would think that this was a market ripe for the plucking, but somehow they've survived all attacks and it looks like they always will. Inertia is a depressing thing in a software company. J.Ja

rarsa
rarsa

I switched from Quicken to GnuCash 6 years ago. The main reason was to avoid having my data hijacked by a proprietary format. I think that the equivalent functionality for GnuCash is Quicken, not Quickbooks. Having said that, Even for mass adoption, GnuCash needs better graphic reporting capabilities.

nathanr.au
nathanr.au

I think you should read http://www.jwz.org/doc/groupware.html - I didn't understand until I read this why things like accounting software, groupware suites and other corporate software won't just appear out of the open source community. Who wants to go home at night and code tax integration with an accounting package? It amazes me that GNUCash is as good as it is. I'm a programmer, I do some work on open source software in my free time and at work, and you'd need to pay me a fair amount to work on accounting software. It's just not an interesting problem.

erik
erik

Can any of these alternatives import QB files? What about Quicken alternatives too? I use both right now.

josh
josh

Check out xTuple: http://www.xtuple.org Think QuickBooks Enterprise, but with MORE features and ZERO cost - available under and OSS license. It has none of the problems outlined above, except perhaps tax integration.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"With the above four features GnuCash could easily take down Quickbooks as the leading financial software." With the above four features, QUICKBOOKS could easily take down Quickbooks. If you're going to wish to for GnuCash improvements, you might as well wish for Quickbooks improvements too. "And better yet, it would give Linux yet another boost." GnuCash comes in a Windows version, too. If those suggested improvements ever materialize, I'd expect they'd show up across all platforms. In that case, Windows users are more likely to install the Windows version than switch to Linux.

Jaqui
Jaqui

of course, the server GNUCash supports is PostgreSQL but the support is there.

pgit
pgit

I suspect you have a dislike for politics in development... could be wrong. You should indeed look into open source projects, in fact you sound well qualified to start the ball rolling on a FOSS quickbooks killer yourself. I would highly encourage you to consider contacting the folks working on gnucash and similar to get a sense of how the process works. Also, being open source if you identified, for instance, a swath of code that could serve as a core of a new direction (aka project) you would be perfectly free to use it at will, no hassles under the GPL. (though you should get familiar with v3 vs v2... there's good reason Linus Torvalds keeps the Linux kernel under GPL v2) And indeed welcome to TR. Lots of solid, useful info and great help around these part.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Welcome aboard. By the way, how do you feel about politics in software development? :-)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

tax software is it. Why bother installing an app most of us use only once a year, knowing it's only good for the one time? The online versions provide the same functionality, are more likely to be up to date without local patching, don't take up space on your drive, are already set up to file electronically, and can be used for the feds at no charge.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

1) There are over a hundred different sets of city, state, and federal tax laws. 2) Even if you limit the application to federal taxes, the rules change every year; often too late in the year for a project with limited resources (read: without paid programmers working overtime) to adopt before tax season.

TucsonGuy
TucsonGuy

I worked with Intuit in 2003 in the QuickBooks activation department. What a rip-off that company is! Intuit "sunsets" or stops supporting version over three years old. When people would call with older versions because they reinstalled and hadn't written down their activation code from their original activation, we were told to tell them the system couldn't generate an activation code because their version was no longer supported and then sell them the newest version. That was technically correct - the system COULDN'T generate an activation code for the older version. However, the activation code was staring us right in the face in their customer record! I remember talking with struggling business owners who couldn't afford to upgrade and who said the version they had did everything they needed, but I wasn't allowed to help them. Many times I would go ahead and give them the code and tell them to write it down as it never changed. They were very appreciative and I just hoped that a supervisor hadn't decided to listen in on that call as I would have been reprimanded or possibly fired. I couldn't take the culture of dishonesty within that company and left pretty quickly.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

It's departure is what launched my trying other products last winter. I wound up with Quicken mostly because of it's connectivity with BofA.

pgit
pgit

"juggernaut" indeed. I suppose we could release all the EMPs and fry every silicon circuit on the planet and go back to scraping figures onto mud tablets with a stick. Short of that, quickbooks will remain the only (viable) game in town.

MrsBryant8
MrsBryant8

I thought accounting was boring too, until I started developing software for it. The developing is still the same and... Accounting is necessary for all Business and for ever - even in earliest written form on Cuniform tablets. It is mentioned all through the Bible such as, "Make yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness; ... And if you have not been faithful in that which is another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?" (Luke 16:11-12) or, "And the Lord said, Who then is that faithful and wise steward, whom his lord shall make ruler over his household, to give them their portion of meat in due season?" (Luke 12:42) I agree with what GreyGeek77 said ... and you get to work with people in EVERY industry. It is actually challenging because: (1) many interconnected modules (2) speed issues accessing huge transaction files (3) industry specific variations and wording (4) federal & state laws governing everything (5) GAAP rules (6) yearly updates necessary as new laws are enacted You will always have a job in accounting & payroll. That is why I decided to go into that field when I returned to America after being away for over 5 years. All the computer stuff had changed and without a degree I couldn't compete for any decent paying computer jobs. If I can combine both talents and make a living, I will be very happy. Not to disagree with you NathanR.Au or anything. ;) Melissa

GreyGeek77
GreyGeek77

Hardly. I supported my family for 15 years modifying an accounting software skeleton I wrote to fit clients specific needs. There are as many challenges to coding accounting software as there was in that fly-by-wire control system I wrote for a new kind of Ag tractor. I wrote software for about 40 years before I retired. The problem is not about interest. It is having enough time to write the code correctly the first time.

GreyGeek77
GreyGeek77

Yes. Read their FAQ or documentation to learn which. That info is usually put up front.

carltech2000
carltech2000

As a business owner Quickbooks is the only thing stopping me from a complete change to Linux.

GreyGeek77
GreyGeek77

http://www.turbocashuk.com/ http://imperium.edoceo.com/ http://lazy8.nu/lazy8ledger/ and probably the most powerful of all: http://www.sql-ledger.org/ So, IF QuickenBooks is your reason for remaining on Windows, EVEN WITH Windows deplorable security record, which places the contents of your books at risk, you now have options. Safe options. IF Brian Krebs recommends that Windows users should use an Unbutu LiveCD to do online banking and shopping, why not just install Ubuntu and leave the viruses and Trojans behind? Better yet, Install Kubuntu 10.4 and enjoy a desktop very similar to Windows, so you won't feel you are in an alien land.

jlwallen
jlwallen

can you find installation instructions for using a GnuCash server? I have looked and looked and can not find any.

MrsBryant8
MrsBryant8

As soon as I logged on to Tech Republic, I knew it was "The One". I have searched sites off and on, but I dislike (1)wordiness with no substance, (2) lame complaining or finger pointing, and (3) know it all's who talk above your head on purpose. I was able to see honest, concise, intelligent, and down to earth discussions, like Jack Wallen's stuff on Linux. I am at a cross-roads career-wise. I am an entrepreneur at heart and am currently working part time as a QB ProAdvisor/Payroll Specialist and part time through Accountemps. However, money-wise, a great opportunity is approaching which would lock me into an 8-5 job 1.25 hrs away. I can only pass it up if I have something else that can earn a little more money than I am currently making. My husband is a big time on-line gamer with America's Army and Battlefield. He has his own server and team and is good at upgrading his hardware to the very best for competition. I've talked him into building and hosting an applications server for me. I want Linux and open source stuff to create an online Virtual Office, but QuickBooks only works on Linux in its Enterprise version. I and my clients have Premier and aren't willing to go to Enterprise. If anyone has any suggestions (such as WINE to run the QuickBooks) would you please help me decide. I really don't want to be a Payroll employee for the last 20 years of my working life. Developing makes me happy and excited and "warm & fuzzy" all over! What think all you who know about applications servers and "virtual offices" and open source development? Thank you for listening, Melissa

MrsBryant8
MrsBryant8

Ha ha. I do get heated about that Politics in Software Development. But I did watch it destroy two companies, an entire language, and a wonderful application package. I am truly an applications developer by heart, and I think of the package as my "baby". So, in essence, it was "murdered"! Anyways, thank you for responding, Melissa

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I love it when actual users sound off! If the improvements Jack suggests for GnuCash were incorporated in the Windows version, would you still be interested in switching?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Is the point of the original article moot? If options are available to both GnuCash and Quickbooks, why do you think Qbooks users haven't already migrated to them? Personally, I have no reasons to consider replacing Windows with Linux. There are several apps I run that are not available in Linux version. Also, I've never had a security issue with Windows; I won't speak for others who are less diligent. I'm not a Quickbooks user either, although I do use Quicken and am quite happy with it. I tried GnuCash for Windows, along with several other closed and open source apps several months ago prior to selecting Quicken. I recall it was far more powerful than I needed, and didn't integrate with my bank's on-line capabilities (BofA). Obviously that doesn't mean many of them wouldn't be an acceptable solution for others.

itadmin
itadmin

Isn't that strange for open source in general? Writing a software application of any size is a LOT of work. To get people to use it would require clear, concise instructions. And that is often missing. It's as if the programmers are so tired after their programming effort, and I can relate to that, that they say, here it is, figure out how to use it, I'm taking a well-deserved break. And then hardly anyone uses it.

Jaqui
Jaqui

but connecting to a postgresql server is a server capability. using postgresql to store the accounts instead of gnucash.

MrsBryant8
MrsBryant8

I appreciate your experienced help in getting an idea of some of the components I will need. I don't have time now to digest it all right now. Bread & Butter payroll going on (semi-monthly). I will keep this thread & your names to throw a plan out to when I get a chance. Greatly appreciative, Melissa

apotheon
apotheon

My favorite free and open source software license by far are the copyfree licenses -- and the Open Works License in particular. If I have to choose from among the most common and popular copyfree licenses, I guess the MIT/X11 license is probably my second favorite, with some of the simplified variants of the BSD License not far behind. Anyway . . . I just wanted to pipe up to encourage new entrants to the world of open source software development to choose simpler, cleaner, less restrictive "Free Software" licenses than the copyleft stuff the FSF prefers to promote. Stick to copyfree.

pgit
pgit

...nobody's going to tell you it's easy. =D As for the email, I solved that problem rather simply. I have one machine that removes the mail from the server, all others leave it on the server. The one that cleans the server is a file/print and archive server, talking about my own systems here, I only recall a few clients having the same question. Open source VPN is a royal pain to set up, one strong datum in favor of "you get what you pay for." Microsoft VPN solutions "just plain work(tm)" But VPN would get you safely into the home base LAN, from there you could use whatever services you've set up, including an application server if you get that far.

MrsBryant8
MrsBryant8

Thanks. I just found the Linux Foundation site and found, a ways down in the list, someone explained what FOSS was. Thank you for explaining some other things too. Would you need a "central droid" if you were trying to offer a virtual office? My current clients are always out in the field and I work either at their office or my home, so moving QuickBooks to a Remote Terminal Server has been a real blessing. But to have the whole office online would be great. Right now I end up with e-mail at home, the client's office, or my laptop. Once I look at it it is on the hard disk of that local computer. If I need to look it up again from somewhere else I'm out of luck. Since you have done other types of online servers, do you think it is even possible to have it all on one online server for a small client base? Still hoping to make this dream a reality, Melissa

pgit
pgit

Free and Open Source Software. The "Free part doesn't necessarily mean "without cost." You can charge for your labors in assembling FOSS such as if you make a targeted distribution, something for a specific task eg a system that controls and monitors a process in a factory. What people mean by "free" beyond cost is a nebulous target. The prime guru of the "movement," Richard Stallman, (always duck when you say that) says it's that the software is liberated, which in turn liberates the people using it. I don't know about you but I'm not feeling particularly liberate lately, and I've used Linux as my main OS for about 13 years now. "Free" to me means unencumbered by any "intellectual property rights," eg it's licensed under the GPL, the BSD license or one of the other similar. I haven't done an application server with Linux, oddly enough. Lots of web and related servers, firewall/routers and file/print servers. One of these days I'll land a big enough office willing to go all FOSS and I'll set up a central droid that does it all. If you want to know about the nature of developing under a free license there' usually a mail list for every project, you can sort of look in over shoulders to get a feel for the community and nature of the work, and even join in to ask questions. The open source community welcomes any and all interested in lending a hand, even if in a very small way. F'rinstance I come across bugs in my main distro and file reports along with whatever information the developers want to try to fix it. Welcome again. I share your view that this is head and shoulders above other forums. The people running the place and contributing know what they are doing, obviously.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I recall it imported Money data, although some data (memorized payees, payee-category assignments) didn't make the transition. Otherwise it went smoothly. If you're only looking to replace Money, not QuickBooks, GnuCash is worth looking at (if you haven't already). I looked at Mint but wasn't comfortable with having my data on the web.

admiraljkb
admiraljkb

Short answer - yes. I'm looking for a replacement myself at this point to get rid of MS Money (yes I know... but I started on it back around ~1993 and xferring data is a bear) Since we're running mostly Ubuntu in the house now, I'm interested in something OSS that works well.

pgit
pgit

I agree, I ran an out-of-the-box win98 laptop with no anti virus or any anti malware apps for 6 or more years without a hitch. First off, it was behind a smoothwall firewall, so nothing ever had a chance to knock on the door. Second, the rule was nothing was ever to be downloaded, and saving information was copy/paste off the web into a text file that would be stashed on a Linux file server. It was a 'public use' machine for my children and their friends, for quick references i.e. the looked up the rules of games frequently to settle disputes. (Risk was huge around here back in the day) The machine was like-new until the day the hardware died. Point being with right practices you can be safe with windows. Problem is this impacts the usefulness of the device profoundly. You swiftly mitigate a lot of the limitations with AV, malware protection etc, but still one may find themselves victim of a facebook exploit despite perfectly maintaining best practices. This is not an issue with Linux, which replaced the win98 box BTW. The children were thrilled when all restrictions were lifted, and I had to laugh seeing ".exe" installers (weatherbug, limewire) scattered all over the desktop. No one ever asked me why they wouldn't install. When I asked had they tried, they told me they thought I had locked the system down... I did explain Linux to them, both my children have used it since. (going on 10 years)

apotheon
apotheon

Obscurity is not security. Try learning something about the real relationship between security and popularity.

TucsonGuy
TucsonGuy

First - I run Linux as my main OS. However, when I was running Windows, I never had any security issues either. Started with PC's with DOS 1.1 and have been through all the DOS versions and all the Windows versions as well as OS/2. I kept my anti-virus software up to date, used firewalls - software at first and then a router with firewall and also my software one. It's mainly not clicking mindlessly on anything that someone sends you. I admit I have downloaded things using P2P, but still didn't get any infections as I made sure everything was scanned before opening. So, while I'm firmly a Linux user, I also don't just tell people that if they use Windows, they're going to be infected. I tell them to protect themselves and use common sense!

Slayer_
Slayer_

Its uncommon sense to most other users. Frankly I still cant believe my parents are virus free for so long... They must be lucky. It took youtube saying your not allowed to use IE6 to finally get them to upgrade browsers.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I keep my current choice of AV updated, run a firewall configured for both inbound and outbound, don't run any file sharing apps, scan what I download, and stay away from the dark questionable corners of the web. I've followed these practices successfully with W95, W98, and currently Vista. I admit some of these may be unnecessary with a Linux system, but I'm comfortable with these trade-offs in exchange for running the software I want to. I also don't have sex with skanks, shoot up with unclean (or any other kind of) needles, or lick toilet seats. It's all just common sense.

Red_One
Red_One

Wow, never had a security issue. You must be running FutureWindows (TM) (R) I make milk money fixing the PC's in the 'hood and it's almost always spyware infestations. On fully updated PCs with antivirus installed. Now my Linux boxes.... I've had one rootkit issue on a RedHat box years ago.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Me, I don't have a reason to go through the trouble of locating replacement apps, finding a Windows emulator that works with those apps that don't have Linux replacements, loading Linux and those apps, learning how the apps differ from what I'm used to, etc. Maybe that's laziness in your book, but I've got plenty of other things I'd rather be doing. I suspect most people do.

andrew_grabowski
andrew_grabowski

Using a Linux LiveCD is no better than using a BartPE cd. I don't need to get my clients to work out how to use Linux, they can continue to use Windows but with out the possibility of criminals installing malware on their PC. Just think, if the majority of users use Linux then the criminals would be writing malware for Linux.

GreyGeek77
GreyGeek77

Ignorance. Lethargy. Laziness. Or, they think their installation of Windows is secure even when experts are telling them to use Linux LiveCDs to do their online banking and shopping. When that keyboard Trojan vectored from their MBR sends their personal info to some thief and money disappears from their bank accounts or charges appear on their CC, then they'll know what they were being told by Brian Krebs and other security experts was true. http://voices.washingtonpost.com/securityfix/2009/10/avoid_windows_malware_bank_on.html

sgtrock111
sgtrock111

Building multi-user, multi-edit capability into a pre-existing application really means completely re-thinking the application architecture. The fact that they don't have an abstracted model for the database lock figured out _before_ they build connectors is a dead giveaway that they haven't done so. Frankly, I think this effort is doomed to near constant flailing if they don't do that hard design work up front.

Editor's Picks