Linux

Go-to open source tools for every task

Whether you're editing the Windows Registry (ugh!), trying to recover data, or looking for a file-synching service, open source tools come to the rescue. Here are some of the most popular tools we've featured at TechRepublic recently.

While looking over TechRepublic's most popular downloads recently, I noticed that several of the top picks were tips on open source tools. Not only are they handy (obviously), they are also very recession-friendly. I decided to round up some of the best ones in one place. Most of these come courtesy of our fearless Linux leader Jack Wallen with only a couple of exceptions. (All of the links are downloads except for OpenDNS.)

Repair your corrupted Windows registry file the easy way Any long time Windows user knows that a single corrupt registry entry can kill an entire Windows installation. And, if you do not have the skills to manually edit your Windows registry, having an application to simplify registry editing can make life so much easier. How do I... Recover lost data with DiskDigger?

Whether it was from accidental deletion or a reformat of a drive, we have all lost data files. DiskDigger searches storage media (SD, CF, USB, hard drives, etc) for traces of lost files using brute-forcing to work its way through every single sector of the drive. Jack Wallen explains how to use this open source application to recover data.

How do I... Remove unwanted files with Ccleaner in one click? Combining the features of Ccleaner with Click & Clean gives you the power to remove unwanted and unnecessary files from a Microsoft Windows PC in one click. Jack Wallen shows you how to set it up. Backup e-mail clients and Web browsers with new tool

MailBrowserBackup is an elegant, simple, and reliable open source application designed specifically to meet your mail client and Web browser back up needs.

10 must-have Linux Web-based tools

There's no shortage of Web-centric Linux tools -- the trick if figuring out which ones are best for your needs. Jack Wallen offers a list of those he thinks are the cream of the crop.

10 Linux and open source developer tools you should not overlook

To take advantage of the excellent Linux development environment, you need to have the right tools. Here's a rundown of some of the best ones out there and the features they have to offer.

Product Spotlight: OpenDNS

Web filtering issues and DNS performance challenges are often complex problems, but the solution need not be overcomplicated. OpenDNS provides free tools and services that help businesses manage Internet use, secure Web traffic and improve DNS performance. (by Erik Eckel)

Use DropBox to seamlessly sync files

Vincent Danen introduces open source DropBox, a file synchronization service that works for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows clients. DropBox can be used to share documents, configuration files, photos, music, or anything else you want between systems linked to your account.

About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

4 comments
jorland
jorland

I have a small website to which I'd like to add a shopping catalog. Do you have a recommendation for a tool to use? I've looked at osCommerce and can't figure out how to use it :(. Thanks for any advice. J

alexpaton1969
alexpaton1969

I would set up the popular cms joomla (www.joomla.org) and then visit the extensions section of the website. Virtuemart is an excellent ecommerce platform, though if you only want to display the catalog, without sales integrated, there are other solutions. Joomla is template based and has built in template editing (code based rather than WYSIWYG). virtuemart plugs into it in a 5 minute installation with absolutely no technical involvement at all. There are also plugins for virtuemart to handle various shipping options, payment processors etc, many of which are opensource. Also worth looking at are PDF plugins, with which you could probably produce a printed catalog. Incidentally, if you have web hosting with fantastico, installing joomla can usually be done with about 3 clicks and answering only about 6 questions.