Enterprise Software

Google Chrome for Linux ready for prime-time

Google announced its stable and speedy version of Chrome for Linux. What's your favorite browser for Linux?

Little Google Chrome is no longer a beta Linux; Google announced yesterday in the Chromium blog that Chrome is "stable":

With continued improvements in plugin support, extensions functionality, and desktop integration, as well as new features such as desktop notifications and bookmark sync, we believe this release of Google Chrome for Linux to be a solid, high-performance, fully-featured, all-purpose browser. From the early porting days of layout test fixing, deep and hairy posix and raw X11 code, to designing a truly native UI and building a host of new and polished features, we're thrilled to work with the larger community to deliver a fast, stable, secure, and sophisticated browser.

You can download the latest Chrome for Linux here and be sure to watch the cool Google Chrome Speed Test video.

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About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

19 comments
sysop-dr
sysop-dr

using open source version of chromium. It works just fine.

skhanna55
skhanna55

Too bad speed isn't everything, unless you're using a marginal interface like a cellphone with limited video real estate and cumbersome controls. Chrome needs to find a balance between functionality, stability, and speed, and so far it hasn't done that. Chrome is currently my primary browser because I often need to have 20+ pages open simultaneously for weeks at a time. Chrome's the only one that does this well, but that comes at a price. Very limited functionality when compared to Firefox or IE. I use Firefox when I need more functionality for a handful of tasks. Pathetically, the most stable and capable of all the browsers has become IE. That's pathetic because all the alternatives came out precisely because IE lacked speed and efficiency and functionality, but as usual, MS learns from opponents. Where IE falls flat is that it still hogs memory and you can't have a lot of windows open at once while still doing other work. Bottom line is that 16 years after Netscape roared onto the scene out of the Mosaic cradle, we're still waiting for the 'perfect browser'. And no, Safari and Opera are on the margins for good reason.

techrepublic@
techrepublic@

Maybe the powerful CPU and lots of RAM in this workstation hides Firefox under performance but I have no problem with Firefox performance even when many dozen tabs are open. As for managing multiple Windows and Tabs, I find Firefox with Tab Mix Plus, Tab Preview, and Showcase extensions far superior to Chromium (Chrome for GNU/Linux).

Brainstorms
Brainstorms

open on my system at work, RHEL 5.4 64-bit. About half as many windows at home, still avg 6 tabs per window, Ubuntu 10.04 64-bit. (Yeah, I know... But my bookmarks list is clogged to uselessness...) No performance or stability issues. Well, as long as you don't open something that has Flush, er Flash on it. Blocking adware sites with my hosts file mostly cures that. :^)

machina2111
machina2111

In your situation how is Opera the better choice? Ive always come across a slow web browsing experience with opera with any version windows, Linux, mobile etc ? What's your secret?

techrepublic@
techrepublic@

"I still like Opera better," I used Opera for about two years but switched to Firefox due to the extensions available. "it actually has a 64bit version" I have been using 64bit Firefox binaries for a good number of years. $ file /usr/lib64/firefox-3.6.6/firefox /usr/lib64/firefox-3.6.6/firefox: ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.6.9, stripped "and I really enjoy the mouse gestures that no one else has bothered to implement." There are Firefox extensions for mouse gestures support.

smiley97111
smiley97111

I agree with Brainstorm, tab stability hasn't been that big of an issue. I run an average of 10 or 12 tabs (usually will recycle one rather than run the total above 20 because can't read the title in the tab anymore:) Running Kubuntu 10.04 64bit though requires a reboot every couple of weeks for kernel updates, so don't know if the tabs persist for months on end. I do know, however that they come right back with complete "back history" when I use the save and close feature before doing the reboot. I still like Opera better, it actually has a 64bit version and I really enjoy the mouse gestures that no one else has bothered to implement. http://my.opera.com/PMAco/blog/internaut-iq-index Smiley

Systems Guy
Systems Guy

Just tried it. It does not have a drop down list (that I could find) of previously visited web sites. I have to type in the url. Yes, it does auto finish but still Firefox and IE have the drop down list.

CPPCrispy
CPPCrispy

I use a combination of Firefox and Chrome.

Jaqui
Jaqui

Galeon the G.N.O.M.E. browser like Konqueror is for KDE? shame on you Selena. ;)

jlwallen
jlwallen

It has been reported - and I can confirm this (from my personal testing) - that Chrome on Linux is the fastest browser on any platform.

machina2111
machina2111

That has been the issue on just about everything I have deployed on my newly upgraded full Linux network. It's amazing that even some old hardware desktops run just as fast as some of the people that went out and bought brand new pc's and laptops. Al running win 7 my only issue is the 64 bit preference VS 32bit platform the 64bit is such a memory hog does anyone have any ideas on how to combat this without upgrading everyone to more memory????

seabird23
seabird23

My experience of chrome is not very good,since installing about 2 weeks ago had nothing but trouble with addons crashing it. gone back to Firefox.

fleztek
fleztek

Your report on Chrome crashing over past 2 weeks caught my attention. I have been using Chrome for past 2+ years, swapping over from Firefox. Been very happy with Chrome, especially when one Tab can freeze, but the rest are still accessible. HOWEVER, over past 7-10 days I have been experiencing Chrome crashes. been through my system etc etc, cannot find what is causing it. Come to think about it, over recent months the number of Total Freezes has slowly been increasing to point now I can't use it ? Anyone have any ideas, or do I go back to FF?

James.F
James.F

Chrome has just been working great for me on my Linux machines, Firefox froze up too often and seems to have a slower response. I?d go as far to stay the Firefox actually runs better on my windows machines. Chrome on Linux is snappy, stable and just a pleasure to use.

Jaqui
Jaqui

lynx, so it isn't the fastest browser. well, lynx, links, and dillo all beat it for speed. :D so 4th fastest maybe.

jlwallen
jlwallen

you can't compare a text-based tool to any GUI tool because the text based tool will ALWAYS be faster. so - if you include LYNX, then sure, Google Chrome is not the fastest browser. ;-)

sysop-dr
sysop-dr

gtkmoz works good and how about browsex? but lynx and elinks are fast too but I think they mean a full featured browser that does say flash and java and html5 and silverlight and all that good (or not) stuff.

Jaqui
Jaqui

a GTK frontend to lynx, but still a GUI app :p

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