Linux

IDC: Linux has proved itself in the enterprise and its rise will continue

Some of the biggest IT industry researchers have been remarking on the positive trends in Linux growth. The latest is a new report from IDC forecasting that enterprise spending in the "Linux ecosystem" will more than double over the next four years.

In addition to Gartner's more measured optimism regarding Linux, IDC analyst's are predicting that enterprise spending in the "Linux ecosystem" will more than double over the next four years, hitting $49 billion by 2011. The growth is attributed to enterprises finding more uses for Linux than the traditional, basic infrastructure components:

"Additional workloads, including database, enterprise resource planning, decision support, and general business processing, are steadily advancing their share of total workload deployments."

IDC's new Linux white paper also says that Linux growth is due to migrations away from proprietary UNIX systems and that the venerable old OS is taking hits from both Windows and Linux.

The Inquirer goes on to suggest that IDC's jargon-laden marketing-speak concerning Linux is a positive development in itself:

It's good to see that Linux is finally adopting a more businesslike approach by leveraging world class competencies and thinking outside the blue sky envelope. The gratuitous use of meaningless management jargon can only accelerate its penetration of ecosystems.

I couldn't have said it better myself!

About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

6 comments
rbradbury
rbradbury

By focusing on paid deployments of Linux, IDC does not count the vast bulk of Linux in the enterprise. Think how many millions of servers and VMs are sitting silently out there running various distros both for testing and mundane server roles, where paid support would not be justified. It's great that spending will grow too, but don't forget that Linux is already ahead in the datacenter, and this lead will grow further given Microsoft's half-baked approach to virtualization. Rurik Bradbury (www.unison.com)

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

I find that hard to beleive. I have 3 servers running various distros of Linux in my datacenter, but then I have 70+ running Windows server 03...not counting the virtual servers. Most of the data centers I visited in my previous job working with Teradata were Windows dominated. Until someone comes up with a replacement for the gold standard exchange server, I don't think this will change. Not to mention a centralized group policy management-like application and something similar to active directory. Not saying I prefer one over the other?I could care less. I have a job to do and I don?t care how it gets done, so long as it gets done and I don?t need to work 20 extra hours a week to do it!

SaabNut
SaabNut

Got an email from Dell today. "One day sale!!! Servers starting at $399!" Piqued my interest. Of course the is with no OS. Add Windows Server with enough CAL's...... price is now $2,000 for that $399 server....

j-mart
j-mart

At the enterprise level the addition of Novell as a serious player in this market has helped with the "Linux push". With Novell's traditional products getting to the end of their life it has given them somewhere to go with their products. The union of Linux with the best of Netware definitely is a good step for them.

Selena Frye
Selena Frye

I do love the jargon! What do you think of the Linux-Windows-UNIX competition? IDC says that Linux's big challenge might come from OpenSolaris. What's your take on the migration trend away from proprietary systems in the enterprise? Is it "the economy, stupid," better technology, or increased word-of-mouth?

jlwallen
jlwallen

i think, personally, it's a combination of two factors: Linux maturation and economy. when IT people are stretching their budgets to the point of snapping, and are asked to continue to grow, the only way they can grow is with open source solutions. sure it may take a bit of research, but once that research is done they find a better solution that puts zero strain on their budgets. TCO - is one of those buzz words that really yanks my chain. why? because it's crap. the reality is that people will do and learn whatever they have to to get the job done. and usually, when people are arguing against Linux, they say training workers to use Linux raises the TCO above that of using Windows. rubbish. most of the people having to learn Linux are either doing it on their spare time or doing it during regular work hours when they can. They aren't going to seminars and classes. they are googling and RTFM'ing.

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