Linux

Mandrake Linux founder offering Open Virtual Desktop Solution for the enterprise

Former Mandrake Linux founder heads up a new company called Ulteo, now offering a Virtual Desktop Solution to serve up Linux applications, but the plans are to support Windows applications as early as 2009.

If you were a fan of Mandrake Linux (now Mandriva), founder Gael Duval has a new open source company called Ulteo. This is Duval's new enterprise since being ousted from Mandriva a couple of years ago. Internetnews.com reports:

Ulteo's new enterprise Open Virtual Desktop Solution is an attempt to break into the broader virtualization and remote desktop space. It's a market that is fiercely competitive with Citrix, VMware and Red Hat's Qumranet all angling for a piece of the market.

According to Ulteo's Web site, the Open Virtual Desktop philosophy is "to allow the IT department to design centrally managed end user virtual desktops in a couple of clicks, combining applications across different environments (first Linux, then Windows, Unix and AJAX) so that organizations can leverage their application assets, supported by the lightest and cheapest infrastructure."

Right now the Ulteo enterprise product will only deliver Linux applications, but plans are going forward to add support for Windows applications in 2009. (If you're interested, they're looking for a few good Windows admins. Really.) The solution is a free download and requires at least two PCs running Ubuntu 8.04.1/x86-32 Server. On the client-side, however, all that is required is Firefox 2/3 or Internet Explorer 6/7, with Javascript enabled and the Java Runtime Environment 1.5/1.6. The business model calls for converting some customers from the free product to purchasing support and additional services.

Ulteo stresses that its solution will simplify the management and support of end user desktops and applications and make for an open, collaborative, and fully mobile virtual environment. Do you think it will catch on?

About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

4 comments
Jaqui
Jaqui

1) Ubuntu 2) Firefox 3) Javascript 4) Java not ever going to touch it with ANY of those strikes against it.

Selena Frye
Selena Frye

What do you think of this kind of solution in the enterprise? Might the worsening economy prove to be a factor in future success?

pgit
pgit

What is Gael thinking? He's gotta know java is a disaster in Linux. Sounds like in order to make this easy you have to set up exactly as stated, Ubuntu etc. I'm going to give this a try, first step is to read the manual on using other than Ubuntu... Mandriva perhaps.

jlwallen
jlwallen

i have always been one that avoids anything that requires java. the problem with Java and Linux is this: you install application A that requires Java Z. next you install application B that requires Java, but won't work with Java Z but requires Java Y. So now you have to install two versions of Java. But then you discover that you can't run Application A and B at the same time because Java Z and Y do not like each other. the whole Java-on-Linux has been a train wreck from day one. this is one area that needs some serious standardization or there will always been issues...and will keep users like me from installing anything that requires java.

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