Linux

Run your Linux apps on Windows without virtualization

The Ulteo Virtual Desktop is a free download that claims to give users the ability to switch between their Windows and Linux applications with ease.

Someone on Digg pointed to this announcement from Ulteo: "With Ulteo Virtual Desktop, you just have to run the application you need to use from the Ulteo panel and its window will show up like any other Windows application. Ulteo Virtual Desktop is free."

Ulteo Virtual Desktop does not actually require virtualization software; it is a special Linux kernel patch called coLinux that you download and install. If you're someone who needs to switch easily and quickly between Windows and Linux apps, it sounds promising. I might give this one a whirl myself. Here is the list of supported applications from the Ulteo site:

  • Firefox web browser enabled with Flash and Java
  • The full OpenOffice.org office suite that can deal with your MS Office documents
  • KPdf to deal with your PDF documents
  • Kopete: the multi-Instant Messaging software that supports MSN and other protocols
  • Skype
  • Thunderbird + Enigmail (so you can encrypt your emails!)
  • Gimp and Digikam to manage your pictures
  • Inkscape and Scribus to create great graphics and newspapers
  • and... many others!

About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

18 comments
japerez
japerez

the lack of the stability given by kernel & OS itself... moreover, it could be useful for a small practice someone not related to linux/unix...

lynn.schmelzer
lynn.schmelzer

I think there is a windows version of every application listed. Why would you run a linux version?

bcarpent1228
bcarpent1228

i downloaded (iso and desktop) and installed on VPC2007 first (safer). Not that impressive - prefer SUSE 10. or UBUNTU (SUSE runs the best, but is a resource hog) Most of the apps run native on windows anyway - or with an API interface. I am going to try the desktop on a smaller winXP machine to see performance (almost everyone runs well on a quad6700)

normhaga
normhaga

may be useful, however it is a Windows environment and users of this program may be lured into a false sense of security because the security is dependent on that of your Windows installation and not that of Linux.

Selena Frye
Selena Frye

Has anyone seen this? If it isn't buggy, it sounds like a pretty good tool for corporate uses who are dealing with lots of different applications.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I think there is a linux version of every application listed. Why would you run a windows version?

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

To run applications that are not written for Windows on Windows. They are not interested in running Windows Applications on Linux and nor are the people who use Open Source as they have gone through a lot to get away from M$. Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I tried a Nix CG application on it and besides being way too slow it works. The reason this app isn't ported to Window is that Windows can not run it fast enough to be usable. :D Col

StealthWiFi
StealthWiFi

I tried it out briefly today. So far no bugs and runs decent. It is still beta so I expect to see more soon. Install was a breeze and easy enough to get a handle on. Next step is to try and install new apps. It's setup to access you Windows My Documents folder which can be very nice. Overall I give it two thumbs up so far. Easy install and not much of a learning curve. Cheers-

MSST8DOG
MSST8DOG

This seems to be useful if you want to migrate something like Thunderbird that you were running on a Linux machine to a windows machine. I run ubuntu on a laptop, but have a tablet that I use at school. I could take my Thunderbird app and copy my profile into my tablet and retain all of my old emails (maybe). I think I will try it out and see what happens.

dbcolo
dbcolo

Since few months I am using andLinux (www.andlinux.org). It is based on coLinux and works like full Ubuntu, and you can copy-paste between your Windows and Linux apps. It's very handy for me. All apps work, perhaps could be memory problem if you run some bigger server applications like Oracle db.

JackOfAllTech
JackOfAllTech

There are currently several small *nix distros that run on top of Windows. I'm at work right now and my list is at home so I can't name them but if you go to www.distrowatch.org you can search for them.

mikep
mikep

The list appears to only include apps that already have windows versions, and the other apps just seem so weak because nothing is listed. K3b? surely nothing windows related can come close to the usability and reliability of this app. QuantaPlus? Eat your haert out dreamweaver, Amarok? clean and tidy, no bloat, Gparted? no need for explanations, Mplayer? Who needs windows media player, its total trash! These would make it more interesting, but in reality, a live linux CD is so much easier and safer, and the windows system can be exorcised with it in a few seconds, lovely!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I realized there weren't any Linux apps I was currently interested in running.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Mostly due to the limited amount of time I spend in Windows these days. I just couldn't resist a mirror'd reply to the usual "but it runs on Windows, why use anything else" post.

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