Linux

The magic of Ubuntu Linux


My love for Linux started WAY back with Caldera 1.0 and Red Hat 4.2. Back then Linux was, quite honestly, a huge challenge to work with. But when it did work it was magic. Sure the resolutions sucked. Oh yeah getting a modem that worked was next to impossible. Sound? If you're lucky. But eventually you had everything going smooth and freaky-like.

That was then, this is now.

After many years of loyalty to Red Hat Linux we all had to jump the shark over to Fedora Core (that is if we wanted to continue with the layout of the land we had mined for so long.) Life with Fefora Core was, well, less than splendid simply because we were working within the confines of a "test-bed" operating system. Fedora Core's initial mission was to roll out releases quickly and remain at the head of the pack as far as "cutting edge". It did that for a long time. And with every new release you had to fight with getting hardware that had previously worked to work yet again. Sometimes getting your system back up (after an upgrade or fresh install of the latest-greatest) was certainly a task no Micro$oft admin would even consider undertaking. But for us Fedora folk, it had become par for the course.

After five releases of the Core I found myself with a bit of a bad taste in my mouth for Fedora. Red Hat had long since left behind the cuddly hacker it helped to primp and preen into post-puberty 'l33tn3ss. The new, improved Red Hat was looking more and more like the M$ of the Linux community.

So where was a long-time Linux zealot to turn? Where else but a community of people who will ship you, free of charge, as many Ubuntu CDs as you wish just so you can spread the love. Yes, Ubuntu was the OS for me.

And not only did their world-hugging attitude attract me but so did the fact that the Ubuntu OS was the first to successfully get the broadcom chipsets used in the iBook airport cards to work. So I grabbed a copy of Kubuntu (the KDE version of Ubuntu) and loaded it up on my trusty white companion. And it did work so wonderfully. I was free to use the programs I had so long ago grown accustomed to using. Scribus.The Gimp.GnuCash. They all worked without the hassle of fink or darwin. I was one happy boy! Giddy, you might say.

And so, after many many years of sporting the Fedora redly, I have moved over to a fresher, debianier, huggier operating system. It's a welcome back-to-the-future leap to how I originally felt about Linux. Now, I'm working with something special again.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

6 comments
Jaqui
Jaqui

use a real distro, linux from scratch. get rid of the pre packaged microsnot style distros and get back to real linux. I actually would never use any of the *buntu variants because they broke *x security and bloated the os with useless crap. why do you require laptop battery monitoring on a desktop machine? got bluetooth devices? no? yet the *buntu's insist on installing the bloat of the bluez-utils for you anyways. want a different browser than firesucks? to bad. remove it and remove the os in the process. don't want the bloat of a gui? to bad, you have to have a gui or no os. just as bad as microshaft

monkapotomus91
monkapotomus91

I learned on ubuntu, but i agree with some of what you say because now that i've gotten to know more about linux, i've been wanting to get something more lightweight the reason they bloat everything though is so n00bs can pick up the OS and not have to do shit to run it

Jaqui
Jaqui

a hge difference between requires and recommends. recommending laptop-utils and bluez-utils doesn't force them to be installed if they are not needed for the hardware. required does. the sudo model of using the non root password for admin breaks the entire concept of the admin account. completely disabling the root account by default is one of the stupidest choices any "security concious" distro could make. and yup, it's the new to linux user that will love it. that is their target user. as soon as the *buntu team made a server install option they lost any respect, since their distro is definately not designed for anything but home use with it's security model.

Jaqui
Jaqui

the *buntu distros are designed to be as "user friendly" [ windows like ] as possible. great for people just coming from windows. most of the single cd distros are meant to fill the same need, and it is a need. The *buntu distros do it better than the others, but they fail in the robustness needed for business use. The larger distros, with multiple cdroms for install media, have the robustness and tools needed for a business use, they don't have the "requires" set on some packages that will enable some hardware. While I'm all for linux use, I would recommend playing around with as many distros as possible before making a decision on which one to use in a business environment. so you can see what software will have to be explicitly chosen to power the hardware and make the transition smoother. [ the boss' toys have to work right the first time or he'll say go back to windows ;) ] a great way to learn that is to do a minimalist install and then add packages as needed to drive the hardware and toys. The *buntu distros don't allow for the minimalist install, they only have the bloat maximumalist install, including packages you most likely don't need. as with any os, bloat is not a good thing in linux, it does slow the system down.

monkapotomus91
monkapotomus91

I am running my copy on a Toshiba satelite 4200 :) 477mhz processor 300mb ram it runs good but i ahve been thinkgina bout moving into a more complex OS

fungus-among-us
fungus-among-us

and I found Ubuntu, and it other variants, easy to learn on. I have Xubuntu loaded on an old (non networked) XP2200 machine and play with that to test things out. My file server is currently running OpenSUSE "because of" the admin configurations of the Ubuntu distros. Ubuntu (and it's variants) is an "easier" linux OS for new users to migrate to. Hopefully, with time, enough knowledge, and experience using a linux system, these new users will eventually choose a different linux distro to move to... one that HAS a root account.