Open Source

Ubuntu pulls the 'official' plug on Kubuntu

The news that Canonical has dropped Kubuntu as an official distribution hits the KDE desktop where it counts. Jack Wallen offers up his take on this developing situation.

On February 6th, 2012, from the fingertips of Jonathan Riddell came the following announcement:

Today I bring the disappointing news that Canonical will no longer be funding my work on Kubuntu after 12.04. Canonical wants to treat Kubuntu in the same way as the other community flavors such as Edubuntu, Lubuntu, and Xubuntu, and support the projects with infrastructure. This is a big challenge to Kubuntu of course and KDE as well.

The practical changes are I won't be able to work on KDE bits in my work time after 12.04 and there won't be paid support for versions after 12.04. This is a rational business decision, Kubuntu has not been a business success after 7 years of trying, and it is unrealistic to expect it to continue to have financial resources put into it.

I have been trying for the last 7 years to create a distro to show the excellent KDE technology in its best light, and we have a lovely community now built around that vision, but it has not taken over the world commercially and shows no immediate signs of doing so despite awesome successes like the world's largest Linux deployment.

Although I don't regularly use the latest KDE desktop and as much business sense as this makes, I still read this with a heavy heart. This marks the loss of the last major distribution to ship with a KDE desktop. Yes, you can still get Kubuntu; you can find releases of other distributions with KDE; you can even install KDE alongside of your current desktop. But try to find a major Linux distribution that ships with KDE as the default desktop. You're going to be hard pressed to do so.

But that doesn't mean KDE is dead -- nor will it ever die. Why? Because KDE very well represents the open source spirit and is the last remaining Linux desktop that resembles that standard desktop metaphor. For this very reason, KDE cannot die. This is also, I believe, one of the unspoken, underlying reasons Canonical dropped KDE.

It's not Unity.

This is probably an ugly truth few want to mention. And although I highly respect what Canonical and Ubuntu has done for the Linux world -- I have to think that any competition on the Linux desktop would be seen as bad business for Canonical. Why? They have a product they have bet the bank on. That product is Ubuntu Unity. And although it's not a bad product, it's a very different product than what the computing world is used to. Now, I have watched that same community accept change over time. And even though they do so begrudgingly, if you offer them a product that works, and works efficiently, they will (over time) accept your product. They did it with Windows 7 and they'll do it with Windows 8. Eventually, that same community will accept both GNOME 3 and Unity. But for the time being, Canonical cannot risk the majority of its users jumping ship and migrating from the official Ubuntu with Unity, to the other official Ubuntu with KDE. So the obvious choice was to drop Kubuntu as an official distribution.

The dropping of Kubuntu does a number of things:

  • It means it will get no financial support from Canonical.
  • The distribution will lose what little marketing it received from Canonical.
  • Kubuntu most likely will flounder and die.

Something radical could (and should) come out of this. I would like to see the KDE team create a new distribution of Linux and simple call it KOS -- no silly take on the name "Linux". Just KOS. This would focus every KDE-centric developer on creating a distribution with the sole purpose of supporting an outstanding desktop. This would do so much for KDE and would bring a far stronger distribution to light than would another Kubuntu.

Otherwise, what's going to happen is that Kubuntu will fall into the same obscure pile as Xubuntu, Edubuntu, and all the other *buntus out there. KDE does not deserve such a fate. KDE is one of the most polished, professional desktops available for the Linux operating system and deserves to be made available through some official channel.

I would hate to see KDE wind up nothing more than an alternative desktop that can be installed from within the Add/Remove Software tool. I've used KDE (on and off) since it's beta release and know how passionate the KDE developers are and how solid the product is. I sincerely hope the loss of Canonical's support for Kubuntu doesn't serve as yet another blow to the "K" Desktop Environment. Linux without KDE is simply not the Linux I've known and loved since the mid-90s.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

157 comments
my_bit_bucket
my_bit_bucket

Mint still has an "officially supported" KDE flavour, and they seem to be gaining a foothold in popularity. After the Ubuntu spyware debacle, I would rather avoid the distro. Even though you can turn off the offending feature, the whole premise flies in the face of FOSS. Trying to kill off KDE makes me hate the distro even more.

melli5
melli5

Atch666, no quality linux programs compared to windows, what planet are you living on.  the hardest thing I found making the conversion from windows to linux was figuring out what the windows equivalent programs are on linux.  Linux programs generally take an abbreviation of the project name, so you end up with names like GIMP (linux version of photoshop), which to most people means nothing and therefore fall short on a marketing perspective, however it is definitely just as capable as Photoshop, and I even go as far as saying more stable/less bugy then Photoshop on windows.

inkScape vs Adobe illustrator, is another example for a graphics program.

IDE's take your pick there are hundreds of fair comparisons to visual studio on linux, I tend to use eclipse, but there are certainly plenty of others if eclipse doesn't tickle your fancy. 

Office, ever heard of open office :-)

I have to admit, there are some crappy programs linux, being developed by some backyard programmer.  there are a lot of programs that have great features, but the interface is just horrible, and visa versa, but you tend to find these programs are the obscure ones you'd rarely or even never use anyway.

I know I'll never go back to windows.

rhinolinux
rhinolinux

Hello, just want to tell you all about the upcoming release of RhinoLINUX, built on the codebases of Ubuntu, and LinuxMint. Our first public release, due shortly, is actually version 3.0 as there were two versions which are development builds only. The RhinoLINUX THREE beta is codenamed "Oneiric ANJI" and as the name implies it is compatible and can use Ubuntu's "oneiric" software repositories.Of course, much of the available Debian applications will work too. We like the idea of choice, especially with new technologies and ideas, the choice to try them, but also one should be able to reject them and continue the way you have been all along. One of the goals of RhinoLINUX, an important one, is to give users the ability to be free in another sense, where their computer operating system, OUT OF THE BOX, is able to allow them to open and edit all common documents and media types, browse the web and communicate using apps we all rely on and are familiar with such as Skype.and Firefox, and also the system itself must be robust, with BUILT-IN backup tools, disk maintenance and recovery apps that work, and do so as SAFELY as possible. Additionally, it was important for us that backward and cross-platform application AND operating system compatibility was included. To this end RhinoLINUX includes VirtualX, our emulation and virtual apps suite, as well as Wine, which has matured and able to run almost any MS Windows app. Desktop environments, which we always found to be one of the most exciting Linux features, that one could have different dashboards on the same engine effectively, are very personal choices at the end of it really, we are all our own person with our own way of working, and I think it is blinkered and even a bit arrogant to try force all yours users to adopt what you like or want to be the standard, back to Bill Gates-style bullying. So RhinoLINUX offers choice here again : Gnome 3, Classic, LXDE, XFCe, Fluxbox, Enlightenment, and the Cinnamon shell. This has become our oasis in the Unity/Gnome issue, and we are confident enough about it that Cinnamon is the default user interface. RhinoLINUX aims to improve on, not replace, its upstream distros, by adding what we felt were essential, and necessary applications, and functionality to them, and then bundling choice, functionality and a bit of fun :). In the words of Mark Shuttleworth, we did what he did with Debian, "stood on the shoulders of giants". The RhinoLINUX distribution can ease the stress on Ubuntu users frustrated with the recent shell changes, while still remaining compatible. Please view our website and Facebook group for more information, download mirrors to be announced shortly. Website: http://www.rhinolinux.com/ - FB group RhinoLINUX (Many screenshots are here) - Hope to see you on our group/site member lists soon.

George2343
George2343

The first system I started using using was Windows 2000, I had to learn how to use it. Then Windows XP Pro, again I had to learn how to use it. I went on line and ask for help in a polite manner and got answers and alot of them referred me to web site that had the answer to my question. I had to read the help pages to get the answer to my question as I have had to do with any Linus system that I've tried to use. As of now, I am using PCLinuxOS with the LXDE Desktop, I have tried Ubuntu and several other Linux Systems, I like PCLinuxOS best of all. The thing is as with any system you use whether it be Windows or Linux you still have to learn how to use them and if you are not willing to put the time in to learn how to use it, then don't be bad mouthing it. I admit that Linux is hard to learn if you are a Windows user as I have been and still am because I am still trying to learn how to use the Linux system. All I'm saying is, you only get out of it what you are willing to put into it, as far as help from the Linux people goes it has been great of course they send me to help sites and I have to read it to get the answer to my question. Question is, are you to sorry to do what it takes to learn? If so then Linux isn't for you.

not_scared_to_learn
not_scared_to_learn

@Tin_Kicker I know this is an old thread, and you might not see this. I have no 'formal computer training', and also remember/used Win3.1. I was M$ dependant up to Win7, and got involved using Ubuntu Distros due to my need for a dependable OS to run a Minecraft server for my son back when it was still in Beta. I now build MC servers as a 'side job' and as a hobby. I have found Ubuntu Server to be THE STABLEST OS for this. Keep in mind, all Ubuntu Desktop Distros run on Ubuntu Server, they just have different Desktop Enviroments. After using Ubuntu Server since 11.10, I started 'getting my feet wet' with various Ubuntu Distros Desktops. I have tried, with fairness and an open mind, Ubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu and Kubuntu, on varying computers with different specs. It is my conclusion that Kubuntu, on a decent spec machine, is simply the best Desktop Os I have ever seen in terms of usefullness. 

I have never, in 4 years, asked for any help learning Linux. I simply do the 'grunt work' reading through the forums finding discussions pertaining to the issue I have. And I have self taught myself, through research, and many screw ups, resulting in complete re-installs, lol. I will bookmark this page and check it for the next several days. If you would like to ask any questions, or request help, just ask :)

murfish2003
murfish2003

Don't whinge about linux not having a larger market share, because the attitude of some of you really leaves a lot to be desired. Basic courtesy goes a long way!

myangeldust
myangeldust

This is why most users don't get into Linux. K-, L-, Ed- Ubuntu? Come on already. Are those even real? Now I gotta look those up.

RickB9
RickB9

Although I don't use KDE, I think it's the best looking of all the Desktop Environments and I'm sure it will continue on strongly, for that reason alone.

ProBasix
ProBasix

"...loss of the last major distrobution to ship with a KDE desktop..." Did you leave someone out...?

itadmin
itadmin

Mepis (mepis.org) has KDE by default and is based on Debian stable. It installs first time without any difficulties at all. It includes all the codecs and players needed for commonly used multimedia as found on the Net. It's more stable than Ubuntu and Mint. A first time user, and old users, should really give Mepis a try.

techrepublic@
techrepublic@

There is already more than enough desktop distributions. I think it would be far better for KDE people to help existing distributions implement KDE in a optimal fashion. Another possibility would be to provide their own repositories and packages for distribution that don't provide KDE or provide poor implementations. KDE 4.8 is the best desktop environment I ever used. Easy to use,l powerful, very flexible, and with an impressive set of features. And after customizing to my taste, very beautiful.

paulfx1
paulfx1

My first experience running KDE was in 1997 I think it was and I ran version 0.14 on Slackware. I might have been the only person on Earth to have done it too. Because back then Slackware didn't support glibc2 applications. Getting glibc2 to run alongside libc5 was kind of tricky for me to do. It wasn't an option that was offered, I had to build it all and by all I mean glibc2, QT, and all of KDE from source, in a very particular way too I might add. Was no simple case of ./configure;make;make install. When I finally got it all to work I'll admit I only ran KDE for a few minutes because it really wasn't too useful back then. It was still an epic high water mark of Linux hacking for me though. Since then compiling code has lost a lot of its luster to me. Still nice to know that no matter what things can be made to work if one is prepared to make the effort.

stuart_lesnett@lesnett.
stuart_lesnett@lesnett.

I have not used KDE under Ubuntu since Ubuntu 10.4 which is still current Linux. I didn't have problems installing but did have problems finding things. I feel that Ubuntu is heading for major problem with the latest changes in direction in 11 and 12. Linux still has many problems with audio, especially pulse, tv cards, i.e entertainment center, conferencing both audio and video unlike Apple and Windows which learned early to handle the wants. Android the kid on the block and my almost reader. Our local library networks has selected the Overdrive application "Windows" as EPUB, PDF and Audio delivery system, i.e. WMA, etc. I have 3 systems 1. desktop 'Ubuntu', laptop 'Windows' EPUBs downloads, Accounting and Tax programs and the tablet Android for a reader and net surfing while computing daily. I thought Ubuntu just might cover all these situation but once again they've lost sight of the user and started play with IT interfaces such as Gnome vs Unity. They seem to missed one basic rule which is the user rules, IBM in the 60s and 70s gave the schools the their systems understanding these students would be the purchasers in the future and as did Windows... It is real to bad so many Linux's so little understanding.

wnematollahi
wnematollahi

"And although [Unity is] not a bad product, it???s a very different product than what the computing world is used to. Now, I have watched that same community accept change over time. And even though they do so begrudgingly, if you offer them a product that works, and works efficiently, they will (over time) accept your product. They did it with Windows 7 and they???ll do it with Windows 8." With all due respect, you are one of the few who believes Unity is not a bad product. Amazingly, you also appear to believe that Win8 is not a bad product!! Canonical is digging its own grave by its refusal to admit that Unity is not very good. I migrated to Arch Linux (xfce) from Ubuntu. As for Win8 (son of Vista), I guess that Micro$oft really wants to boost the fortunes of Apple and the successful Linux distributors, the ones that know that KDE is here to stay.

Cybie257
Cybie257

It's true, Unity killed Ubuntu for me. Almost killed Linux for me. I love Linux and Ubuntu, but like KDE, Unity should hit the road. Gnome/Gnome Classic was the easiest, simplest to use/navigate DE that I have ever used. Unity made it a mess and as far as I am concerned, very Vista like. I've since stopped installing new version of Ubuntu, sticking to 10.04LTS. But, now I've possibly found an Ubuntu Based Distro that brings back the proper feel and simplicity along with an old name that I love dearly. It's a new OS called Commodore OS. I've been a big fan of Ubuntu for many years, since 6.06, but not since Unity 11.04/11.11. Not my thing and is very annoying if I may say. Many things I see going wrong with Linux that keeps it from becoming mainstream and that's just the fact that there are too many variations and distributions. Too much choice is just as bad as not enough choice. Linux has a long ways to go before anything big happens with it and getting rid of Kubuntu is a good start to head in that direction. You can't support too many of similar products that aren't compatible with each other (in general terms, not geek abilities) and expect your products to take off, free or not free of charge.

Brian Doe
Brian Doe

Although Kubuntu may have been one of the most popular KDE-based distros, it is not the only major KDE distro out there. OpenSUSE ships with KDE as its default desktop.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

Ubuntu kills Kubuntu. I installed Ubuntu Unity 12.04 and hated it enough to uninstall it; I installed the Kubuntu version and it was easy to run. If Ubuntu is flushing KDE, I guess it's time to flush Ubuntu.

Bob-El
Bob-El

From my perspective, it's funny (not in the "ha! ha!" sense) how things are going with Ubuntu. I first explored Ubuntu several years ago on an old Pentium III desktop and an old Toshiba laptop now over 10 years old. With new releases up to 10.04, I found my old "box" was running slower and slower. So I replaced my motherboard with an Athlon-based one that had been given to me by a friend. It's an oldie also but half as old, perhaps, as the PIII. Meanwhile, I was running 10.04 on the laptop having problems with unexplained freezes, a carry-over problem from 9.04. A few months ago, Jack (I think it was Jack) wrote a blog on XFCE stating that it often worked better on older computers. So I installed Xubuntu (I think 10.04) on my laptop and, for the few things I run on it, it works. I can't say that XFCE is a beautiful GUI. It isn't. But best of all, the unexplained freezes have disappeared. A couple of years ago I purchased an ASUS Netbook on which I dual-booted 10.04 and Win7. Initially, I chose the Netbook Remix version which, I assume, was a sort-of precursor to Trinity. After a year of not really liking it, I installed 11.04 and passed on Trinity in favour of Gnome 2. I had previously installed 11.04 on my desktop computer and Trinity would not even install on it. I assume it's because the built-in graphics processor is rather lame. At this point, the only computers I have that I think would run Trinity are my other desktop running Windows 7 and my Netbook. So, I've been thinking about jumping ship and trying Linux Mint 12. I follow Jack's blogs regularly. I like his writing style and, in general, I find his advice and opinions of value. I had been thinking of giving Kubuntu a try. From what I can see it is not as far removed from Gnome as Trinity. But that won't be happening anymore. It's interesting the direction taken by Ubuntu with Trinity. Look at Windows 8. Are these GUIs simple change for the sake of change or are they REALLY and improvement? Do we need a change? As for Apple, I gave up on them years ago when an OS change meant a new computer. I figure Apple computers are for people with money to spare or so completely computer illiterate, they have not other choice. What is an operating system with a GUI if not a means by which we access software for entertainment, work, play or education? Yes, it's nice to have an attractive desktop but isn't that what wallpaper is for? Some people dress up their desktop with pictures and others with folders. Shouldn't we have the choice as to how our desktops should look? When I used Remix I missed the convenience of just dropping temporary files or important links on my desktop. I may be mistaken but doesn't Trinity prohibit that also? When I get new software, I realize there's a learning curve. But do I really want to experience a major learning curve like Trinity or Windows 8? Not I! I don't view these changes as improving my computing experience. I expect these changes will waste my time learning them when I could be better engaged doing other things. I may be retired, but I'm not dead and I have other things I want to spend my time doing. I do not feel the need to have a new interface. So, in the spring, when the cold and snow have abandoned Canada for another few months and I return from Costa Rica, I think I will give Linux Mint 12 a good look and see if it doesn't please me more than the mutation of Ubuntu.

skinch
skinch

What about Mandriva? I have not used Linux for a few years but when I did I kicked off with Mandrake (later Mandriva) and I think that it still ships with KDE by default doesn't it?

billyg
billyg

This will be a natural selection of sorts. It will be good for KDE to stand on its own three legs. "What don't kill fatten." Canonical is behaving like a real business. This is good for them.

TG2
TG2

The entire problem starts at and with the installation. When was the last time you ran through an installer, or had the option after the fact, to look at, test drive, and make a more informed choice on your desktop when installing said OS? Newbies have no clue ... and people coming from XP, Vista, and 7, are *NOT* going to be thrilled with trying out a Touch based Interface ... especially since they don't HAVE touch screens.. and just like Windows 8 ... who wants to scroll with their mouse three fourths of the screen, when they use to just click once and have a list of apps ... or for the few times hit the "programs" menu and again were presented with a list within half an inch of mouse movement. Idiots at Gnome & Ubuntu are planning for everyone to have a touch screen... 5 or 8 years down the road maybe so ... but they've lost the users of TODAY's computers.. and it would be my sincere hope that this slaps them in the face and people move away from them for their stupidity ... I mean these are people more intelligent than *I* yet they can't make their program work on a 22inch screen, so that the mouse menus stay within the windowed application space? ie.. I don't run *anything* full screen and rather than *see* the app is windowed and keep the menus *with* the app ... they always force the menu's back up top? Is that intelligent? I think not.. it smacks more of stupidity and arrogance thinking they know best.. when obviously they don't .. Their only saving grace, at this point, is that people don't have to pay them for the privilege of their stupidity. That's why I can't wait to see Microsoft push 8 onto people's desktops ... watch that people won't pay for the piece of sh*t microsoft wants to peddle..

bzebarth
bzebarth

Kubuntu wasn't the last or even best Linux distro to ship with KDE. openSUSE ships with it, along with other desktops, but KDE is well supported. I have been using it for a while since deciding I didn't like Unity or GNOME 3. Sure this decision is a big blow to KDE but I think as the rest of the Linux desktop world moves away from traditional desktops, a lot of people like myself will discover KDE.

dr.it.weldoc
dr.it.weldoc

Have worked with both Ubuntu and Kubuntu and always have preferred KDE over Gnome. I don't know why really I just like the look and flow of KDE better. I have been very happy with KDE4. My favorite Linux flavor is PCLinuxOS with KDE4. Sorry Ubuntu.

kthan
kthan

I use SuSE Linux with KDE desktop as my primary Linux development workstation. Try SuSE if you want a strong KDE desktop. I primarily develop Python and perl scripts for our ERP system that runs on IBM AIX, and the KDE desktop makes for a very productive development environment.

majortomgb
majortomgb

I still find all the Ubuntu derivatives generally worse than PCLinuxOS which I have been using for a number of years now. Just because it's the most popular doesn't mean it's the best. Instead of looking for another Ubuntu derivative, try some of the other ones out there. My feeling is that Ubuntu are the Microsoft of The Linux world forcing change their way when nobody wants it.

davidpearson
davidpearson

Kubuntu is still an "official" ubuntu version. The difference is that they are not paying the developers to produce it, rather they are going the community way of doing it. Just like all other Ubuntu versions. KDE will not die due to this, OpenSuse is still a KDE distro, KDE is still available in repo's Mint have just released a KDE version..

mitchloftus
mitchloftus

I have to say.... I don't much care for the current iteration of Gnome very much. I just checked out the Fedora 16 "default" Gnome iso, loaded it up on hard drive, then almost immediately loaded on the KDE desktop. I could maybe get used to the Gnome, and it has a couple of interesting features.... but it seems cumbersome to me somehow.

Systems Guy
Systems Guy

Bummer. I haven't and don't care much for Gnome; I've always liked KDE. When I found Kbuntu a few years ago, I've used it ever since.

pgit
pgit

If Mandriva survives the latest bankruptcy threat, it'll be the KDE distribution of choice. They have had a deep, mutual development program for some time, and it shows in the smooth functionality of everything KDE on the Mandriva OS. It also provides the greatest number of options, there's more plasma desktop widgets, run launchers and monitoring tools available than with any other distribution I've seen. With Canonical's move, it would behoove the KDE developers to redouble their efforts with Mandriva, perhaps even help with whatever is needed to keep the company going. btw on that Mandriva news front, all I know for sure is that updated packages, bug fixes and security updates, continue to come in from the Mandriva team. In fact, January and February have been the busiest months for updates from Mandriva in a long time, perhaps a couple years.

francisco.augusto
francisco.augusto

HI guys, i started and use Ubuntu since last october the version 11.10 it's kind of XP ou other GUI lauched on 90's. When the Canonical will release new Ubuntu up to date with a new GUI (unity it's terrible) . Canonica most leave to the user customizing and move the Lauch Barr, it's enough to make the user life easy. Now with tablets and new way to use the PC and related geeks,I belive that LINUX world will be impacted a lot. Like the guys of work with mainframes (it still with us on the large companies) but nobody think much on it.

acbarclay
acbarclay

Linux Mint released their KDE version of Mint 12 less than 2 weeks ago. They seem to be catering to the desires of the majority of Linux users better than Ubuntu.

atch666
atch666

Well, maybe linux would be much more successful OS if the so called community would threat "new" users with friendly and encouraging attitude instead of this now famous reply to almost every technical question: RTFM. Guys, this way you are killing yourself. I've tried few times to switch from Windows to Linux, and due to the fact that I was a "new" user I asked different questions. RTFM was what I got most of the time. So if in order to do x, y and z I have to RTFM, let me tell you, I don't want to RTFM, I need answer to a specific question and I don't have hours of time on hand to spend and read FM. And the funniest thing is that in this FM very often there isn't answer to this question. Guys, blame yourself. On Windows if I need an answer, I'm getting it, nicely, politely, without problems, without telling me that Windows is just for professionals (as I've got replies that Linux is). Guys, blame yourself. Customer service is one of the most important things and you simply didn't have it.

ksarkies
ksarkies

I was forced to try out Unity and Gnome 3 in order to keep up with Ubuntu upgrades. I did try hard, but they are immature and they just didn't work for me (and Gnome Classic appears to be badly broken). They "get in the way" of what I need to do. My impression is that a lot of people are now moving onto KDE to be able to maintain a desktop that is mature and workable for them. Whatever Ubuntu elects to do in the future I think we desperately need to maintain choice, since different people do different things in different ways. MS is also making similar fundamental UI changes but in their case their users cannot keep the old way of doing things without dropping far behind. KDE gives us that choice so please let's keep it alive and growing.

jkameleon
jkameleon

As a matter of fact it's THE distribution for people who like the KDE desktop. How I switched from Windows to Ubuntu, Mint, Kubuntu, and finally OpenSUSE: 1) Tested classical Gnome based Ubuntu on VM on Windows, and said to myself: "Ummm... this doesn't look half bad. Got to see how it works on the box of its own" 2) Bought myself new computer, installed Windows 7 on one partition, Ubuntu on another, left 2 partitions empty, just in case. Later on, this made switching from distro to distro very easy. 3) Installed all the eye candy, Compiz & stuff, and gradually got hooked on it. Compiz sphere looks great, plus, if you bind it to one of the mouse side buttons, enables you to find your windows & switch between them very quickly. 4) Canonical mingled Unity with Compiz, and broke everything. Aarrgh! Switched to Mint Julia. 5) Upgraded Mint from Julia to Katya. Katya's Compiz was bug-compatible with Canonical's bastardized version. Aaarrrgh! Switched to Kubuntu. 6) Kubuntu upgrade broke MySql Workbench. Aaaarrgh! Switched to OpenSUSE. For the time being, I'm quite satisfied with OpenSUSE. Apart from some troubles with GRUB2/GRUB discrepancies, and the usual wrestling with NVIDIA drivers, I had no mentionable problems.

Gerry_z
Gerry_z

I booted my first Linux distro from a free Ubuntu CD in 2006. I've experimented with Mepis, Puppy, DSL, Debian, Xubuntu, Mandriva, and Freespire to name a few distros. But I always came back to Kubuntu and it remains my OS of Daily use today as it has been most ofthe time since '07. It just feels right to me. If the KDE team decides to create their own OS they can count me in as one of their charter users.

CodeCurmudgeon
CodeCurmudgeon

I've never been much of a fan of KDE. I did start out my Linux use with MEPIS which used KDE and I found it pretty uninspiring. I switched to Ubuntu with version 6.06, and I'm still using Ubuntu, though on 11.10 now. After suffering with Unity for the over a year (the desktop switcher is excruciating to use, and I switch desktops a LOT!) I installed Cinnamon last month, and the relief was instant. Now, Cinnamon is a Gnome fork, sponsored by the Mint Linux folk, but it works just fine with Ubuntu. The GUI issue has been tempting me to defect to Mint, but at this point installing Cinnamon was much quicker and easier. Now, when Ubuntu 12.04 appears, I'll have to decide If HUD makes Unity more usable. I'll probably run it for a while on a thumb drive, before I up and install it on my main system. If HUD doesn't help enough, I'll install the next release of Mint when it gets here.

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