Linux

Upgrading Ubuntu 12.04 to 12.10

Ubuntu 12.10 is released in just days. Jack Wallen walks you through the process of upgrading from Ubuntu 12.04 to 12.10, so you can enjoy the experience a few days early.

Ubuntu 12.10 will be officially released Oct 18, 2012. For many current Ubuntu users, this is a must-have release. Not only will it improve the already outstanding Unity interface, it will also bring to the table a more efficient kernel and many more under the hood improvements.

But it's the improvements on the outside that should bring current users as well as new users flocking to this release. Imagine:

  • From the Unity Dash being able to search for new music from the music store
  • Easily searching Amazon.com from the Unity Dash (Figure A at right)
  • Easier updates to the software
  • Quick previews in Ubuntu Unity's Dash (for files on machine as well as purchasable items -- Figure B below)

These features are just a taste of what 12.10 will bring to the table.

It has been understood that updates shouldn't be done... that full installations are the safest route to success. My take on this is that any major update (say from 11.10 to 12.04) should be done as complete installation. For an update from a .04 to .10 release, often the online updates work fine. That is not a universal -- I've read of people having issues with fglx issues in the update. I have tested the update from 12.04 to 12.10 and have experienced nothing but success. In the end -- the added features and improvements certainly make this worth the time and effort involved.

On average, you should allow anywhere from thirty to sixty minutes for this update. This depends completely upon the speed of your machine and your internet connection. There are over one thousand packages to be updated for this to work.

I shouldn't have to say this, but I will:

Back up your data! You do not want to jump the gun only to lose your data. I have never experienced a loss of data due to a Ubuntu upgrade, but you should always back up your data, regardless.

So, if you're ready for it, let's walk through the process.

Step 1: Update your system

Before you begin the upgrade process, it is key that you have all packages fully updated on your machine. So open the update manager and run an update. Depending upon what is updated, you may have to restart the machine.

Step 2: Run the update manager again The second run of the update manager requires you go into the settings. From within the settings window (Figure C below),  select "For any new version" from the Notify me of a new Ubuntu version drop-down. With that section set, click close.

Figure B

Step 3: Run the update manager in distribution update mode with the command: update-manager -d.

This time, when the update manager opens, a new button will appear allowing you to upgrade to the new release. Click Upgrade to being the process (you will prompted for your sudo password).

Step 4: Wait

This is what will take the majority of the time for the process. Allow everything to continue on. At one point near the end of this process, you will be prompted to either keep or delete obsolete packages. Either keep them or delete them (some will not run at this point now).

Step 5: Reboot

You will have to reboot the machine once the process is complete. One you have rebooted, you should now be able to log into your newly upgraded machine. If you're like me, you'll certainly enjoy the new features and improvements to Ubuntu (especially with Unity). Let us all know your experience with this process and with the new release of Ubuntu.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

12 comments
freezeron
freezeron

And you like compiz, then don't upgrade to 12.10. because compiz crashes more frequently than I breath. Without compiz I have to suffer through Unity. I like my Cairo that works, and it works in 12.04 so does compiz..Which is why Cairo works so well. I have sperately installed and then disgarded 12.10, just to see the diference, and the only difference I see from .04 to .10 is Amazon Phoning home to the mothership on every keystrooke you make....

cearrach
cearrach

Wow, loading that 2.4 MB, 1920x1080 image (screenshot-from-2012-10-14-153647.png) was painful - please create a thumbnail for it!

btsites
btsites

How about the steps to do this from CLI?

ammar_su
ammar_su

Unity is the End of ubuntu

knura
knura

12.04 is long term support (LTS) and 12.10 is not. For servers and desktops in production (business environment)- the suggested norm is to stay with LTS releases. Except for may be very small shops, a desktop refresh every six months is not feasible.

LinuxForAll
LinuxForAll

Thank Jack for the introduction on how to upgrade. I been using Linux for sometime now and when ubuntu introduced unity, it served me well from day 1. I love unity!!. I work as an IT consultant, and have deployed linux into 3 small business. I use to get calls all the time, with previous versions, calls such us, My desktop icon has disappear and can raise an invoice, can't find writer, can't find calc, etc. This are engineering shops, they don't know and they don't care what system they use as long as it works. All of the above issues disappeared with the introduction of Unity. And it is so much easer for training the non technical people, all you do is tell them about the supper key, and to type what ever they want and that is it. Great job Ubuntu, with Unity I can support linux and keep my full time job!

TG2
TG2

is that really all you have to offer? And then to call Unity "outstanding"? wow.. speechless .. dumbfounded ... more like irritated, and bewildered ... that you would be on perk-o-late rather than cover this with a more even keel that would provide substance for both camps. ie.. there are those of us that hate unity and have switched away from beloved ubuntu because of it ... usually the same camp that hates this Windows 8 metro bullsh*t ... I don't have a tablet, and any OS that doesn't theme-atically update according to the abilities of the PC in this day and age.. is wrong. Just plain wrong. Years will shows this comes back again ... in cyclic design ... the "all over the place" mouse gestures will again be replaced by the simplified "start button" like concept ... where your menu items are within a few inches rather than everywhere all over the screen (ie. hot corner gives you a plethora of iconic finger selectable icon areas, etc) Again ... you people you're not on a tablet why should you have to mouse 3/4ths of your 22 inch monitor to get something done?

gregsshac
gregsshac

I upgraded on a older PC which took about 90 minutes ,rebooted and up came 12.10. The thing I have noticed is the PC is much slower on responses, but it is probably due to the PC being old, however I like the presentation,although it takes some how-to on my part.

tonylom3
tonylom3

I haven't had any past problems with Ubuntu upgrades. The main issue I face (for a variety of reasons) is sloooow connection speeds. It would be nice if there were a command line switch to start the upgrade and delete the obsolete packages automagically. That way I could start the upgrade and let it run over night if needed.

tr
tr

As I understand the version scheme, there is no scale difference between the jump from 11.10 to 12.04 and the jump from 12.04 to 12.10. The numbers are not major.minor versions like you would normally expect to see in software versions, they are simply a release date within the semi-annual release schedule. Version 12.04 is simply the April 2012 release while 12.10 is the October 2012. I would suggest a more accurate determination of the risk involved in using an update verses a clean install would be the upgrade from a Long-Term-Support (LTS) version to a non-LTS version. In this case, the upgrade from 12.04 to 12.10 is actually introducing more risk by using more cutting edge components. Personally, I have had VERY FEW issues with using non-LTS versions over the LTS versions, but the risk is there. AMusnikow mentioned installing a 32-bit version... I am more curious about how the increasing prominence of 64-bit architectures is affecting the development of core components. How much of a 64-bit version of a distro is still dependent on 32-bit components and are applications being optimized for the newer technologies? How quickly is the divide growing between distros designed for modern PCs and those that specialize in keeping older PCs alive.

AMusnikow
AMusnikow

I just upgraded to Release 12.10 (quantal) 32-bit following your instructions and it went smoothly.

thereallifeboy
thereallifeboy

At first I hated Unity for it's lack. I ignored it. With 12.04 I returned to it just to see how it fared. And now I use it on my primary laptop. I'll upgrade to 12.10 as soon as I have figured out if my somewhat old hardware can handle it. Unity is not the end of Ubuntu. It may be the end of Microsoft though!