Windows

Vista and hardware support


Today I read something I nearly couldn't believe. Micro$oft came out to say that it was only going to "allow" but ONE significant hardware "change" before support remediation must be used. 

Say what? So MicroShaft is saying that people that actually purchase the new Vista OS are only going to be able to make one upgrade before they might have to PAY for another license? 

That's right. The actual language in the agreement says:

"The first user of the software may reassign the license to another device one time. If you reassign the license, that other device becomes the 'licensed device.'"

A spokesperson from MicroShart was quoted saying:

"Validation will fail if the software detects a substantially different hardware configuration. At that point, the customer is able to use the one reassignment for the new device. If, after using its one reassignment right, a customer again exceeds the tolerance for updated components, the customer can purchase an additional license or seek remediation through Microsoft’s support services."

So, your hard drive fail - you get one mulligan. But when that motherboard fails you're gonna be buying Vista once again. Oh joy. Oh rapture! Thank you so much MicroScam for giving us all the opportunity to open our wallets up twice for you...

Oh wait...I can download the latest open source operating system that fits my needs, burn the iso onto disk (with k3b thank you very much), and install it on as many computers as I want. And on those computers I can change out hardware at will with no consequence.

So tell me again why people are choosing an operating system from a company that has continued to gouge the public for every penny it can? I certainly can't figure it out. I've been using open source operating systems for over ten years now and I've not missed a beat with the computer industry. So, why is it people think they need Vista? 

Is it the pretty interface? Well, KDE can whip up just as much transparency as Vista (and has been able to for quite some time.) Is it the hardware recognition? Can't be that because Vista seems to only want certain hardware. Is it the support? That's certainly not free nor reliable.

So what is it? What is it that draws people to this Monolithic monster?

Or maybe they won't be so drawn this time around. Maybe MicroSchlep has pretty much run their course. Maybe now's the time for the open source community to attack. When the best M$ can do is demand your credit card numbers the open source community can offer up an even better computing experience without the user having to so much as pay for a license ONE TIME.

Attack open source! Attack! 

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

10 comments
craiglarry
craiglarry

MS threatened to give only one renewal, but later, because there was such a huge outcry and protest, changed its mind. Said, OK, we will keep it the same as winxp. Whose idea it was to do this, should be interesting to know, Ballmer? Mr. Bluster!

stress junkie
stress junkie

If we are lucky nobody will upgrade to Vista. Their only sales will be preinstalled Vista on Dell computers. Microsoft certainly has a right to be paid for its products. On the other hand they are making life miserable for their legitimate customers. What level of revenue allows business managers to shrug off pirated copies of their product? I don't know. Apparently Microsoft managers would say that there is no level of revenue to be satisfied with legitimate vs. black market end users. One lost license is too many. I would say what about the legitimate customer's right to use the product legally and without hassles?

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

How is small/medium business going to deal with the one upgrade rule. Or what about students with removable hdds (ala my job) that move from machine to machine (some are the same, but upgrade cycles mean we have some different hw as well). Vista can die in a fire...I'm not going to be punished because MS can't figure out a way to make sure my copy is legit.

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

First, it was unproffessional at least. This was certainly a biased article with the sole purpose to slam MS. I agree, the licensing for MS products are geared towards MS advantage. But, Win XP has similar requirements. With HW getting cheaper and cheaper all of the time, it would be against MS advantage to consider any change to be major. Also, in XP, you can call MS and explain the issue (bad MB) and they will re-issue a license without charge. Although I do not like this way of doing things, and I do recommend moving to Linux (at least for many things), I do not think that MS will change their current policies much, and charge for a new license if your MB goes out 1 week and your HDD dies sometime later (example). This would not be in their best interest because too many people would move off of a MS based solution and lost revinue would be very noticeable in a short time. Dont get me wrong, I do not love MS, and there are legitimate areas to bash them on, but I doubt that this particular issue will really be an issue.

jlwallen
jlwallen

I should probably have been a bit more clear in the introduction to my blog.... I was the Editor in Chief of Linux content for TechRepublic a long, long time ago. Back then I had a column called "Get Jack'd". That column was very much in-line with the Linux and open source community and was full of fire and brimstone and loads of MS bashing. That was a part of the culture back then. That particular column enjoyed the some of the highest praise and popularity. So when I was asked to write another blog, I thought it was a good vehicle to bring back the days of old when Linux was a teeth-gnashing underdog that had one true goal - world domination. I guess I should have warned that a lot of my writing should be read with tongue firmly planted in cheek. Do I like Microsoft? Not really. I don't use their products nor ever plan on it. I disagree with their business practices and I think their operating systems are second-rate. I've been using Linux for a very long time. I started out with Caldera Open Linux 1 and quickly moved over to Red Hat 4. So my teeth were cut at a very different period in the growth of Linux. Many may look at my words as unprofessional. But the spirit behind them is what counts. I'm passionate about it. Linux users of old are passionate about their OSs. So forgive me a little humor when it comes to my writing about MS. And remember, Linux was born to frag!

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

I hope Vista fails too. Plus, you wanna hear something funny? For purchases (Vista Capable) before Christmas, most vendors chose to do a free upgrade option when Vista became avail (in the USA at least). Which large vendor did not choose this option and plans on just discounting the SW.... Take a guess..... Ok, Dell. It seems that even Dell does not prefer Vista, so they are charging for an upgrade to Vista (discounted though), keeping XP as the preferred solution.

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

But I doubt that the change took place from an article such as this. There were Valid points, but it was written very poorly. Using Micro$oft and Microshaft, among others, just makes this appear to be a rant from an uninformed person.

stress junkie
stress junkie

If this makes it into the final retail license then I will recant, abjure, and detest my previous comments.

jlwallen
jlwallen

...and MS changed their policy on their hardware updates. Just check out this article. people complained and MS actually listened!

CG IT
CG IT

Computer prices are almost at the point printers have gotten to. If it dies, it's just about the same price to fix it as to buy a new one. That's not to say the gamer rigs who shell out $$ thousands for a high end rigs. Their caught in a jamb. Games tend to get caught up in the latest and greatest game and constantly upgrade their comps with new stuff, thus involving product activation problems. To that, well you can always call Microsoft or run another O/S than Windows. The license is geared for the consumer market where consumers often don't upgrade their computers with new stuff every 8 months or so rather hang on to the thing for 4 to 5 years. By then MS ought to have Vista's replacement out.