Software

Check out our Office 2010 photo gallery for a look at what to expect

If you're ramping up for a possible upgrade to Office 2010, here are some useful resources -- including Mark Kaelin's 50+-image screenshot gallery.

Microsoft is taking pre-orders for Office 2010, and based on the comments of some TechRepublic members, there seems to be significant interest in making the jump.

When Deb Shinder evaluated the new version, she found numerous improvements -- such as the customizable Ribbon, Excel sparklines and slicers, useful Outlook interface changes, and Word's drag-and-drop navigation pane. This recently published TechNet article offers a comprehensive look at what's been added, changed, and removed from the new version of the suite, along with application-specific lists of changes.

And as you're sifting through the details, specs, and features -- and perhaps evaluating the pros and cons of an upgrade -- you can take a visual tour of what the new release has to offer. Mark Kaelin put together these images of the Office Professional Plus 2010 version of the suite.

About

Jody Gilbert has been writing and editing technical articles for the past 25 years. She was part of the team that launched TechRepublic and is now senior editor for Tech Pro Research.

4 comments
paul
paul

Just DON'T install Outlook 2010. I installed Office 2010 yesterday and then had to do a system restore as Outlook 2010 doesn't reliably send mail at all. (Call me picky but I want a mail program to do two things first - send and receive.) If you check the web, sending has been a major bug since early betas. I tried all the work arounds on the web - none worked. The only way to send exchange and pop3 mail was to quit the program, killth process as it doesn't exit properly, then reload - repeat as often as you want t send mail. Outlook 2007, with the same settings, worked perfectly before and after. How can Microsoft release a product - I downloaded the RTM version - which just fails to do its primary functon?

1bn0
1bn0

Does adding the FILE tab mean I can go back to using all of the old alt-f , character menu shortcuts that are imbedded in my sub-concious? Worth getting the hell out of Office 2007 just for that alone.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Mine was an upgraded over Office 07, not a clean install. Maybe that's the difference?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Alt-F brings up the File menu. However, a couple of the shortcuts there have changed. The File menu itself looks radically different from the 2003 and previous versions, and different from all the other menus. While it does open a drop-down list, it also opens a pane that offers a variety of configuration options. This pane temporarily hides the spreadsheet (or document, or presentation, depending on the app). First feature I noticed (besides the File menu): in Outlook, clicking 'Reply to All' no longer includes your own address. The 'Conditional Formatting' options in Excel are more extensive, but more complicated; they're require a bit of study if you're going to use them effectively.

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