Software

How to insert multiple rows in a Word table

Adding an new row to a Word table is an easy task. Adding multiple rows is just as easy, if you know this simple trick.

You probably know that you can add a row to the end of a table by pressing Tab in the last column. Doing so generates a new blank row at the bottom of the table for you to fill in. This method is probably the one that's most familiar to you.

Once a table is complete, you may find that you need to insert new rows between existing rows. Doing so is relatively easy:

  1. Click anywhere inside a row above or below where you want to insert the new row.
  2. On the contextual Layout tab, click Insert Above or Insert Below, accordingly, in the Rows & Columns group.

Word will insert a new row! You could also right-click and choose Insert, and then select the appropriate insert command.

What you might not know is that you can add multiple rows just as easily! The trick is to select the appropriate number of existing rows before inserting. To illustrate, we'll add three new rows above 5 in the table below:

  1. Select the representative rows for 5, 6, and 7. You select three rows, because you want to insert three rows. If you wanted to insert four rows, you'd select four rows, and so on.
  2. Click the contextual Layout tab, if necessary.
  3. Click Insert Above in the Rows & Columns group. As you can see, Word adds three new rows with just one insert action!

If you're familiar with Excel, you may already know this trick, without realizing it. You can use the same process to insert multiple rows into an Excel sheet. You can also use this same technique to insert multiple columns.

About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

7 comments
bunnylaw
bunnylaw

Really helpful - thanks. You wouldn't believe how long I've spent inserting single rows multiple times.

TheKandiman
TheKandiman

This may be picking at nits, but in the example above, the new rows are inserted above row 3, not row 5.

jerrym
jerrym

I just copy the row above or below (highlight, right-click-copy, right-click-paste). Then press the F4 key (duplicate last action) as many times as rows that I need.

BRS
BRS

I can't remember how to do this with out it moving the table down 1 line. Any ideas?

jbenton
jbenton

Usually I want the new row to have similar content to an existing one, so I select the existing row (by clicking to its left) then press/click copy followed by paste. Copy of the row is inserted, ready for updating. If I then want to relocate it, I press alt-up/down (which looks pretty impressive if you've not seen it before) Also works with multiple rows. JB

jbenton
jbenton

that's still above row 5, just not directly

jbenton
jbenton

see 1st comment above

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