Software

Office challenge: How would you print index cards in Word?

In this week's Office Challenge, test your Word skills with an interesting printing challenge involving index cards.

A Word user needs to create and print a number of index cards. This challenge actually has two problems: creating the cards in Word and then printing them. The solution is easier than you might realize! How do you help this user?

But, before you actually walk this user through a solution, there's something you ought to check first. What is it?

About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

13 comments
dtisserand
dtisserand

Not all index cards are 3x5 most newer printers accommodate various sizes because of digital camera photos I regularly print out notecards 6x9- Text on one side and our logo on the other you need to set up custom size on your printer options. You will need to use your manual feed because of heavy paper/cardstock The perforated whole sheets are more costly , add an extra step of tearing them apart - and you might rip one then have to start again to replace the damage. If you are using a card size often - create a template that you can use for that card and name it then just chose that when doing your Word page set up To me labels are messy - get bubbles , wrinkles, need to be lined up perfectly - not really professional looking

dave
dave

8 1/2 x 11 card stock with 3 index cards and tear away edges. Have some Avery ones myself but mislayed the package so can't give you the number off the package.

Clarkb
Clarkb

I have printed both 3x5 and 4x6 index cards (regular or duplex) from Word. From File tab, use the Page setup, Paper, Paper size, Select Custom. Then indicate the size of the index card, Width 6 and Height 4 for the 4x6 or Width 5 and Height 3 for the 3x5. Once the size is set formatted the information needed on the card, adjust your printer tray or manual feeder, stacked the cards and print. Hope this helps. Email me if you want a sample layout, put Print index card in the subject line.

lockhaca
lockhaca

We always have index cards in the office. Instead of buying preforated Avery index cards just get larger labels, print on them and stick it to card. IF you need ot reprint a card, you don't waist an entiry sheet of preforated index cards.

nystan50
nystan50

The simple way,most printer will handle avery labels, so go out an buy some avery labels for index card. Use the mailing menu in word, go to create labels, options and product number.

Ray Baker
Ray Baker

Can the printer handle index cards? Size and stock thickness. If so, will it print decently, that is without smearing. Can you stack index cards? And what orientation will the printer accept?

dhays
dhays

Why orient them that way, it would seem to me the printer would work better with the paper oriented portrait style. For manual feed, such as mentioned before in my earlier comment, the 1994 printer I use has to have a certain length to trigger the paper feed. Just guessing, but it seems to me that the paper oriented in portrait style is how it should be fed through the printer. Normal 8.5 x 11 paper is not fed landscape but portrait style, through any printer I know of.

dhays
dhays

waste. waist is what you put your belt on. perforated, not preforated For a sheet of labels, I always reuse the sheet until it is done. I am not sure about a set of cards, haven't seen or used any. I have some 1/2 sheet cardstock paper I use for varying things, I usually set up a table in Word to handle the text and set the page size to the paper size (4.5 in x 8.5 in), then use the single sheet feeder to print them one at a time. If one gets too small, the printer might not work like you want it to. It would be like printing on photo paper, I don't know if there is a 3x5 photo paper or not. I have a personal laser at my desk and that is what I use to print them. My printer does not support 3x5 paper in the tray so it would have to be done using manual feed. A more modern printer (mine is a 1994 model) might handle things better. My home printer has the capability of stacking paper different sized than the standard 8.5 x 11 in the input tray and it might suppoert 3x5.

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

That's what we do. You select the avery label type in word, create your stuff, merge mail, and print. Sometimes I have to run the paper thru the printer one sheet at a time.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

It doesn't matter what you do in Word (or any other app) if your printer won't handle the media you want to use (index cards, Legal or Ledger size, transparencies, labels, etc.). As to the Word problem, you could probably set the page size to 3"x5" or 4"x6" and be good to go. You'll have to play with the margins. I'm trying to imagine a scenario when you would want to do this, but I can't come up with one.

spdragoo
spdragoo

When you take a Word document & format it to print a Letter-sized page in Landscape mode, the width becomes 11" and the height becomes 8.5". It doesn't affect how the paper feeds from the paper tray, just how it prints out. By setting your document to Landscape, you would feed the index cards longways (i.e. manual feed set to 3"-wide paper), but it prints out the correct way on the card.

spdragoo
spdragoo

Don't bother with margin adjustment, that only gives you an index card-zied print area on a normal sheet of paper. You'll need to use the Paper tab under Page Setup, either selecting "Index Card" if it shows up or "Custom" & specify the card size. With that, though, remember to factor in the paper orientation; the envelope feeder may work best with a Landscape, which means reversing the margins.

dhays
dhays

that was my point, it is done under program control, to me he was suggesting you orient the cards in the paper tray in a landscape format, no matter which way the page is oriented. I usually have to put the narrow side facing in, not the wide side was my point. Paper placement, not document orientation.

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