Software

Office challenge: What's the quickest way to enable the Macro Recorder in Word?

Learn the answer to last week's challenge on keyboard shortcuts and test your Word macro skills in this week's challenge.
If you use VBA with Word, you know that turning on the Macro Recorder is often the quickest way to automate a task. You could try to beat out the code yourself, but why work so hard when you don't have to? Of course, you won't always get exactly the code you need, but with a little tweaking, you can usually get the job done quicker by starting with the recorded code. So, what's the quickest way to enable the Macro Recorder in Word? (Note, I didn't say the most traditional method. I asked for the quickest method.) Last week we asked: What keyboard shortcuts let you change the size of a word or phrase in Word? Your response was overwhelming and it was a fun challenge! The keyboard shortcut I had in mind was [Ctrl]+> to increase the font size of the current word or selected text and [Ctrl]+< to decrease the font size. The greater than and less than signs were the clue I mentioned. If you're really focused, that connection just pops right out at you. Len222 was the first to respond with a shortcut -- [Ctrl]+] and [Ctrl]+[ -- although they weren't the pair I had in mind.  Len222's shortcuts are simpler, as you don't have to remember the [Shift] key (< and > are [Shift] characters).  But the  bracket keys aren't as intuitive as the < and > signs. If you've got them memorized, they work just as well! But a word to the wise, they aren't interchangeable: The < and > shortcuts default to the Font Size control to determine the percentage increased or decreased; the [ and ] shortcuts decrease and increase by one point. Steve.McCurdy was the first to mention the < and > shortcuts. A related shortcut, definitely worth noting is [Ctrl]+[Shift]+P. This shortcut gives focus to the Font Size control. You can then enter the size you want and press [Enter] to change the size of the current word or selected text. Thanks to everyone for taking part in this week's challenge! Think you can stump everyone with an interesting challenge? Feel free to post it in the Comments section.

About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

10 comments
happymedia_dz
happymedia_dz

Hi, The quickest way to begin recording a macro is to click on the macro recording button. In word 2007, you can found it on the status bar. if it'snt visible show, it by checkin this option on the contextual menu off the status bar. In word 2003, you will found this button on the VBA toolbar or add it to any other toolbar. Regards

ultimitloozer
ultimitloozer

The quickest way to record a macro in Word 2007 is to click the Record Macro button in the status bar (normally the 4th item from the left) at the bottom of the window.

Joaquim Amado Lopes
Joaquim Amado Lopes

On Word 2007, assign a keyboard shorcut to the commands ToolsRecordMacroToggle (start and stop recording) and PauseRecorder (pause and resume recording), in the Developer Tab.

hariks0
hariks0

What is the workaround to paste more than one line of text like say, address block into a single cell of Excel. Usually if we paste or paste special, the data will be pasted to more than one cell in the column.

candzgramma
candzgramma

Bless you for pointing this out. Thank you!

jstead
jstead

Click the MACRO button on the Status Bar at the bottom of the screen (to the right of the page number, etc). If the button isn't visible - right-click the Status Bar and choose MACRO RECORDING from the pop-up menu that appears.

DosHog
DosHog

Choose the cell, then paste the multi-line item into the formula bar. When you go to the next cell, Excel (XP and 2003, maybe 2007) automatically turns on word wrap. All will accept the paste. You maintain the line feeds. The only negative that I can see is that numbers are treated as text (probably because of the line feeds). When it comes to trying new things, it has always been my motto that 'We've got a backup and you can't (usually*) hurt hardware with software so go for it." * I remember a command destroying a Hercules 8 bit Mono graphics card but never saw any other code hurt hardware. ;>)

david.hanshumaker
david.hanshumaker

You may have to first delete all the carriage returns that put the original text onto several lines. Once all the text is on a single line, copy and paste that into your Excel cell. It should go into a single cell. Next, edit the text in the cell by inserting ALT Enter where you want the text to move to the next line. It isn't elegant if you have many cells to fill, but it might work.

DAWNLEE_HI
DAWNLEE_HI

right click in cell, select format cells, goto Alignment tab and select Wrap Text in the Text control section.