Microsoft

Office challenge: Why won't my Word table's borders print?

This week test your Word skills with a table printing problem and learn the solution to last week's Excel sheet navigation challenge.

A user calls with the following complaint: table borders won't print. They're on screen, but they just won't print. With just a quick bit of sleuthing, you're able to discern the problem. What's wrong and what do you tell your user to do?

Last week we asked… What's the quickest way to select the last cell to the right or bottom of a data range? You offered a number of great shortcuts, but I had a specific trick in mind. None of you mentioned the quick mouse trick that I had in mind, so here it is:
  • Double-click the right border of a cell to select the last used cell to the right.
  • Double-click a cell's bottom border to select the last used cell below.
This trick only works for the right and bottom borders, but it's still slick. I'm sure many readers will be able to put your useful suggestions to good use. Thanks for playing along this week.

About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

6 comments
dhays
dhays

Tha only works if you have a completely filled column. My spreadsheets often have empty cells awaiting a completion date of a task, so this only takes you to the blank cell, then you have to repeat it again and again to get to the end, or pick a column you know has no blanks.

bhkolts
bhkolts

In Word 2003, the 'Borders and Shading' dialog box controls the printing of the table borders. From the 'Table' menu select 'Table Properties'. In the 'Table Properties' dialog box select the 'Table" tab and then the 'Borders and Shading' button. In the 'Borders and Shading' dialog box select the 'Borders' tab. On this property sheet, selecting 'None' will gray out the table borders and not display them in 'Print Preview'. Selecting 'All' will show the borders in both the display and 'Print Preview'. Barry

jbenton
jbenton

I only use this technique in combination with the shift key to extend a selection in the specified direction (which would otherwise be shrunk); I'd always use the cursor keys to navigate

jbenton
jbenton

I suspect that the user had show gridlines set, but no borders The gridlines just show where the borders WOULD BE if they were set and can be toggled between on and off using the Table submenu from the Menu bar (in 2003) Print preview will not show these gridlines but print layout view will

dogknees
dogknees

I also noticed that double-clicking the top border takes you to row 1 in the same column and double-clicking the laft edge takes you to column A in the same row. Saves a lot of scrolling.

dhays
dhays

Selecting none will remove your borders and if you have a custom set of borders, you wouldn't want to remove the borders, it would make a bunch of busywork to replace them. If you have a document such as the one I have open at present, all table cells have borders, so it wouldn't be a problem to remove them and replace them. It probably is as one responder mentioned, gridlines are present without borders actually being used. I do that on some documents to avoid the printout being cluttered with cell borders.