Software

Office poll: Will your organization upgrade to 2010?

Some experts suggest that Office 2010 is going to be to Office 2007 what Windows 7 is to Vista. But will it be worth the upgrade? This week's Office poll asks about your organization's plans for Office 2010.

About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

10 comments
mc.black
mc.black

I'm still using Word version X for Apple Macintosh and it has far more features than I need or use. I only use version X because I was unable to install Word version 5.1a onto my then new computer which runs OS 10. If I could revert to version 5.1a, I would NOT hesitate to do so.

robertlbradley
robertlbradley

Most organizations, I suspect, are not driven to upgrade by a new Office release. Office is usually a byproduct of an upgrade driven by another factor. Sometimes that factor is a desire not to fall too far behind in the upgrade cycle. Other times it is driven by a key program that requires more resources or newer techology. In any case, unless a company's situation is critical, it is foolish to upgrade to a new release as soon as it comes out. Even if there are no problems with the software itself, compatibility issues may make the software unusable. I typically wait at least six months after the initial release date to upgrade.

john3347
john3347

No, I will not be adopting Office 2010! I trialed Office 2007 for about 6 months and went back to 2003. I am currently testing 2010 Technical Preview. I, and my office, will not adopt ANY product that forces the use of the inefficient and non-intuitive and screen-robbing ribbon. With several new and useful features in 2010, it is very disappointing that an option to choose between traditional drop down menus and the @#$%^& ribbon is not offered.

rpage
rpage

we still use 2000 Office Suite for nearly everything - Word, Excel, Access, Publisher. We had to get Outlook 2003 for Exchange Server. Are there serious advantages to upgrading at all? I am very cynical. unless getting to spend money on more memory to handle the ever increasing appetite of each new Microsoft software upgrade is a benefit.

Capt_Skippy
Capt_Skippy

Why would a company upgrade to Office 2010 when most of them still use 2003 and haven't migrated to 2007. There are only so many ways to type up a document.

Tech easy
Tech easy

We are doing great with the Office 2007. So we really dont think we would update it to 2010 version. Maybe a few years later.

davidt
davidt

No thanks, we'll stay with 2007 and keep our full-functioning Word....

scottie_lipa
scottie_lipa

It appears by your post, that something is not working on a full-functioning standard for Word. What have you noticed that is not working properly? This is a technical release, so I am guessing they have 1-2 more revisions before a final is given the go for sale.

scottie_lipa
scottie_lipa

Our organization will be switching to Office 2010 as part of our Windows 7 migration. Right now, we are on Office 2003. Some of the Pros for the change: 1) Ribbons have been around for a while now. Many users are using the Office 2007 version available to them from our EA (Home Use Program). For us, that saves on the training costs. Also, Microsoft is building this interface (ribbons) into apps already inside Windows, like Paint and WordPad. Since they will see the ribbons one way or another, we are looking at it as a "show them how to find the new stuff" conducted via training seminars. 2) Excel has numerous features that we could have already leveraged as a business. More lines and columns supported; we are already seeing files with the 64,xxx rows maxed out. (Yeah they should have a database, but we are lean and programming is for our ERP systems, so users make do with what they know). The conditional formatting is a very nice feature, allowing multiple conditions to exist and some of the built in templates as well. 3) Our organization runs on Excel and PowerPoint. SmartArt has really been beneficial in cleaning up lousy looking presentations. 4) Conversation threads will be a great enhancement, as the paper trail some are keeping is astounding. (2010 feature) The new overview look Outlook offers was a nice change. Being able to see the next few meetings, a calendar, your Inbox and preview pane gives a lot of detail in one quick look. The Quick Steps for Forward: FYI is neat, but not much of a timesaver though. Team Email, To Manager and Team Meeting show some promise for Active Directory integration. 5) Minimize the Ribbon button in each app of the 2010 Suite was a nice addition to clear away the busy looking ribbon when you are collaborating or typing. Some of the Cons: 1) In Outlook 2010, it gets updated to the Ribbon bar and the screen looks really busy. In fact, I found it down right distracting. 2) As with any version to my knowledge, a new version has always meant that Access databases get broken. So any change is typically not welcome by those building in Access. Yes I can get most/some of these in Office 2007. Our Customer base is already planning migrations or has migrated to Office 2007. The compatibility packs Microsoft released do not fix everything. The compatibility pack has certainly allowed us to stay where we are a lot longer, but at the cost of understanding all the complexities and training users on work-around. With everything in IT having a lifecycle, we are finding so to do our applications. It would be nice if we could stay Windows XP and Office 2003, as our business is running just fine. Unfortunately, in order for vendors to make money, they must develop new software and phase out their support for older systems. Balancing the "Keeping up with the Jones'" and being "left behind and out of date" scenarios is a challenge I think all IT departments are facing right now. At one juncture, there is this cost to be current that Execs see as money to be current and they can't appreciate the value. At the other end of the spectrum is the being so far behind because the benefits and costs were not endured over time that you have a mountain of cost and change in front of you. I suppose it all comes down to how your Execs and Accountants want you to spend the money.

ssharkins
ssharkins

That's a lot of great information. I'm sure it will help a lot of people!

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