Software

Poll: When does your organization plan to migrate to Office 2010?

The TechRepublic Microsoft Office Blog polls members: When does your organization plan to migrate to Office 2010?

On May 7, 2010, Susan Harkins asked the TechRepublic membership what version of Office they were using and supporting. The answers ranged from Office XP to Office 2007. But just this past week, Jason Hiner used TechRepublic's CIO Jury as a touchstone regarding the deployment of Microsoft Office 2010. And to our surprise, the CIOs are enthusiastic about migrating to Office 2010.

But the real question is what do they think about Microsoft Office 2010 down in the trenches? Is your organization planning to deploy it? Will Office 2010 replace Office 2007 or Office 2003 in your organization? What is the time frame and how much user training will be involved?

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About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

41 comments
paul
paul

We are doing it now.

Sean Elliott
Sean Elliott

Two of us in our IT department are testing Office 2010. Well, it was two. I've just uninstalled Office 2010. We will not be migrating to Office 2010 until they fix it. It doesn't work properly at all. I can't even fill out a simple form. It's erasing all of the form field formatting in Word. There are issues with Powerpoint and there are issues with Blackberry's Desktop Messenger. All of this is unacceptable. I'm telling everyone I know to stay away from Office 2010.

ddanell
ddanell

I have been fighting the glut of the worthless "Ribbon" ever since making the mistake of moving into 2007. 2010 is supposedly worse. OpenOffice is looking better every day. The MS Ribbon is totally in the way of people who utilize spreadsheets and wproc in a production-development mode. The ribbon clogs up the screen with features that rarely get used by power users. I wish MS would fix the bugs in Excel before cluttering up their code even worse...

scallahan58
scallahan58

Open Office is far simpler to use and free. This means less money going out for software and far less time for training. No brainer.

d_handler@sbcglobal.net
d_handler@sbcglobal.net

No plans, happy with open office. new release coming

donaldgagnon1
donaldgagnon1

Open Office is far better than MS Office, hands down, but it offers no email client like Outlook with calendar capabilities to tie it all together, otherwise, MS Office wouldn't even be on our systems. If OOo could complete that package, MS Office would cease to have any great attraction, no matter what their pricing was. I still won't migrate to MS Office 2010 because it carries over all the wasted ribbon nonsense from 2007 and remains a resource glutton, but until OOo creates an Outlook style client, I'm stuck with Office 2007.

carlsf
carlsf

Mail application some are quite clever. Do a "outlook like apps" search in google, you may be supprised......

scallahan58
scallahan58

Open Office will link with windows mail, and it works just like outlook. It even looks similar, and will work with outlook add-ons.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

If not how do you add more to your systems?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

if you buy a license for a current MS product, you're covered if you choose to install a previous version. If you buy a 10 license, you're okay for a single installation of 10 or 07 or 03 or 00 or etc. Usually. I double check my rep or other authority before making licensing decisions on my say-so.

Darren B - KC
Darren B - KC

We're just now setting up a deployment schedule to switch to Office 2007. Office 2010 is nice, but we could actually continue to use Office 2003 just fine for awhile yet.

BlazNT2
BlazNT2

I work with Electronic Medical Records. My issues with 2007 and 2010 is with .rtf and .txt. We import from both file types and neither work every time. I have to completely reboot the Data Transfer Station every time it happens. By the way .doc and .docx do not work at all from those versions. It only works with 2003 and early versions. This is a really big issue for medical records. The chart is just blank from the import. If it is not caught right away the document is shreded and then that is a real issue. 2007-2010 will not be used any time soon

Playability
Playability

The open source competition is so advanced now I can't see how a business case can be made for Microsoft Office. Infact I know several companies quite happily ticking over on Office 2003 because they didn't like the ribbon in 2007 or the licensing. Why even upgrade if it's doing the job?

cavehomme1
cavehomme1

Indeed, Office 2003 is consistent across all the range of applications including Visio and Project. Office 2007 is a mix of ribbon for the popular apps plus traditional menus and icons for Visio and Project. Office 2010 i understand is now all ribbon, but still requires more clicks to function. why on earth would anyone spend a lot of money, unless they have it to spare, on changing to a new interface and training users who were quite happy the previous one or two decades. Yes, change can be good, but not when it impacts productivity and costs. Sometimes companies like MS and Google just need to accept that somebody got the interface right and that only minor tweaks are needed, not a revolution, since there is no real benefit, only disruption and costs. Sometimes some people really need to get out of their coccoons and go do a real job in a real company producing real things bought by demanding customers who want the best service / price. About time that the young wannabees in MS and Google matured a bit and listened to their customers.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Say you needed 20 more users for office 2003, what would you do in terms of licensing here?

donaldgagnon1
donaldgagnon1

We've been running the beta for quite some time and, so far, I'm not impressed. The grammar checker in Outlook and Word seems like they were designed by someone who never worked with the English language before. It's more difficult to get at certain functions now, so migrating from 2007 to this one is going to require some really unnecessary retraining which I don't really have time for. 2007 is still what we rely on (and are quite happy with). While it does have some new and helpful features, I think MS, once again, tried to fix something that wasn't broken. Change just for the sake of change is pointless and a waste of my money. Interestingly, Outlook and Word are probably the most popular of the programs within the Office suite and pretty much go together, yet you can only get the Outlook side of the mix in the higher-end versions. That issue alone, which forces me to spend more than necessary just to get the two features I need most, will keep me with 2007 for quite a while longer. It works, so why fix it? Besides, there will no doubt be various fixes and updates as it goes along, so I'll wait until those have been released and maybe then make the investment. 2007 does everything I need, so I have little incentive to even go there.

Daniel Breslauer
Daniel Breslauer

Out of circa 70 deployed systems, almost all of which are currently on Office 2007 (a couple on 2003 and 2 on 2010), I'm planning to have all upgraded to 2010 by the end of this summer.

tony.reid
tony.reid

Whilst DOCX has been a problem for us, its only really a problem when we work with companies that are running beta or original pre-releases of 2007/or the XP to 2007 converter pack. Having bitten the bullet and just finished rolling 2007 - I think we are ready to roll 2010.

jfuller05
jfuller05

We just recently installed Office 2007 on all of the computers. I spoke with the Treasurer just last week about Office 2010 and she said it will be a while before we'll purchase 2010. Her "while" can be translated as "a long time, a very long time."

carlsf
carlsf

Still on Office 2003 PRO. We did not go 2007 the "RIBBON" and we can do everything on Office 2003. As for 2010 it Still has the "RIBBON" and to get all to apps that come with Office 2010 we would ahve to purchase the aditions form MS, the cost is the other reason.

Daniel Breslauer
Daniel Breslauer

Am I the only one here who works in an enterprise covered by Software Assurance? In my company (being a relatively small branch office of a large international enterprise), I started using Windows 7 RTM in early November 2009 and Office 2010 RTM about 2 weeks ago. Is nobody here covered by SA? Why doesn't your company consider this option? Honestly, I'm not involved in any of the financial issues - but I sure know that the benefits outweigh the costs for me, the guy who supports it all. I'm much, much more comfortable supporting Windows 7 + Office 2007/2010 than supporting Windows XP + Office 2003 or even older software.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I have several companies who have Software Assurance and they have moved back to 2003 because 2007 or for that matter 2010 have some strange [i]Features[/i] which convert the Changed Save option back to the the M$ Preferred Default which isn't acceptable to Government Departments who they submit Tenders to. Seems that if they submit a Tender in DOCX and not DOC it's not looked at or anything more done to it than dumped. One company who is the preferred Tenderer had a decent sized Tender lost because of this issue as the person sending the tender is not a High End user and just expects Office to work as she had it set. Didn't matter that the saved format was DOC as the Monthly Patches always or at least almost always change it back to the M$ Default. Then for another series of places who do Medical work when they submit a report it also has to be in DOC format and 2007 killed it for them as it kept changing back to DOCX which made 2007 unusable for them. After all Highly Qualified Surgeons can not be expected to have to always change the Saved Format to DOC and Government Departments currently [b]Are Not[/b] installing the Office Converter Patch to their systems so it's useless to this section of the business world. I do however love telling Surgeons that they have no idea of what it is that they where doing and while I can get away with it I don't believe that many others could. :D While they maintain Software Assurance they are not using either 7 or the newer versions of Office though some of the other M$ products that are covered by SA are useful to them and this makes it worthwhile to maintain the SA. ;) Col

dwilga
dwilga

Even with a SA agreement in place and thus the right to a "free" upgrade is available, the soft-cost of switching is far too expensive. In an already lean office environment, with those folks who are left being double-tasked with work formerly done by from laid-off coworkers it is difficult to justify even more lost productivity to retrain these workers on office apps just for the sake of keeping up with Microsoft's new "vision."

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

What works for the user is what is important and the need to constantly upgrade is a waste of time. Though here some of the smaller places do have SA they are no longer chasing the upgrade monster for their Office and OS requirements since the advent of both Vista and Office 2007. ;) They are however still upgrading other M$ Apps till at least M$ start changing those as well I suppose. :D One of these places did ask about 7 recently and when I offered to bring over a NB to let them have a play I was told that the dog was hungry so did I wish to rephrase that. :^0 Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

One place only has 4 people working there and no Server. That makes it a bit hard. As for the Medical ones they are generally small One Person Practices or at least a Part Time Practice that has to communicate with Government Offices. It's not possible to instigate a GP in cases like that. ;) Col

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Forces everything to .doc regardless of any patch.

jfuller05
jfuller05

As a IT Support Person you are supposed to make the users life easier not be there to teach them new things that are not directly connected to their Jobs or in the case of a Computer user who has been using word for years and doesn't really understand how a computer works not to mention isn't interested that they have to learn. Most End Users just want it to work which is exactly what Word did for many years and they where happy with. If the users want to stay with Office 2007, that's OK with me because I don't use Office that often at work, they do. My attitude at work is that I'm there to help them use their software. If it works and they're happy, then I'm happy. I'll show them new technologies, so they can see what is new and if they want to upgrade, but most often the general opinion from the users is to stick with what works; and that is ok with me.

DigiTechDude
DigiTechDude

I just set a group policy for Office 2007 config to default the save to .doc format, no more .docx issues. Since the first couple .docx mishaps haven'd had any since creating that GPO for .doc default.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

The change doesn't stick beyond the next Patch that gets applied if you are lucky. Unfortunately it doesn't work that way and only seem to be an issue when it goes out unnoticed as a .docx. Not all computer users are that cleaver and then again not all those charged with supporting them are that bright either. I can remember one Help Desk Guy from MYOB telling the user to Delete the old Data File when they upgraded to the new suite. Of course when the changes didn't work because the end user misunderstood what it was that she was expected to do there was no Data File to convert any more. Wasn't so bad that they told her to delete the Data File from the replaced Application but to tell them to delete the Backup Data File is a completely different story. :D But with Office 2007 it doesn't stick and changes back to DOCX with most patches. Surgeons expect things to just work and they will not be told. Try it sometime and see what happens. As a IT Support Person you are supposed to make the users life easier not be there to teach them new things that are not directly connected to their Jobs or in the case of a Computer user who has been using word for years and doesn't really understand how a computer works [i]not to mention isn't interested[/i] that they have to learn. Most End Users just want it to work which is exactly what Word did for many years and they where happy with. M$ like most software companies here makes changes that they deem necessary and ignore what the people who use it require. Hence you change the defaults they stay that way for a while and then change back and the end users don't pick it up, because they didn't have to look before and don't see why they should start now. Computers are supposed to make their lives easier not harder and have them learning all new things with every new software release. When it comes to Business this is just expensive as Quotes/Tenders will not be looked at or accepted, where as with medical it can lead to the death of people and Medical doesn't like that happening for some strange reason. Apparently when the deaths gets investigated they look bad, and in the case of one company here who didn't get considered for a 20 Million Government Contract which they most likely would have got it costs them lots in lost income. That one issue spread through the Industry like Wild Fire and now no one in that Industry trusts Office 2007 or the newer versions. In one place a M$ Rep came in and tried to get them to migrate to Vista even though the then new Photocopier come Network Printer wasn't supported by Vista. The M$ Guys option was to buy a new Network printer for a 4 person shop. Even at the top 4 NB costing 2 K didn't come close to the 45 K Network Printer and the 100 K spent building a building to house it. They needed a reinforced floor for the Finisher that had a Guillotine in it to cut off the folded paper so that the booklets had a flat edge. When the M$ guy got a bit overzealous I'm told by both sides that the owner of the place sicked the dogs onto the guy from M$. Now if I walk in there with anything that is even vaguely related to Vista they don't want to know about it. I'm still not sure several years latter just what happened but since that time I've never suggested to any clients that they get M$ in to advise them on their needs. Took a very long time to make that customer happy and it just wasn't necessary. Col

Daniel Breslauer
Daniel Breslauer

So set the default file save format to be .doc; works fine for me when I do it. I can't see why this small issue would prevent a full migration. Teach the users to be a bit more careful, enable file type extension visibility. Educate them on the difference between .doc and .docx. I don't think these are issues that should force an entire company to keep on using outdated software forever. Another option might be to use Office 2007/2010 and use OpenOffice next to it. Or, for example, give the users Office 2007/2010 without Word, and give them access only to OOo Writer.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

No plans. We hope to finish deploying 07 this year.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Is your organization planning to deploy Office 2010? Will it replace Office 2007 or Office 2003 in your organization? What is the time frame and how much user training will be involved?

s.jenkins
s.jenkins

We are gradually migrating our 200+ users to 2007, and won't even consider 2010 while we still have some with 2003. We don't want to support 3 versions of Office at the same time! Anyway, we do have an Enterprise Agreement, and could go to 2010 if we wished, but we won't go there for several years. We've found that teaching users some useful things, like how to build their own custom toolbars and minimize the ribbon, takes some of the frustration out of the learning curve. There is also a set of tools you can install that help them look up commands, get additional training in small chunks, etc. By getting the admin staff on board first, we are smoothing out the path for the engineers to migrate. Our migration was driven by the fact that most of our clients were migrating to 2007.

jody.burton
jody.burton

Many of our computers were kept with Win NT/Office 97 in order to support legacy software. Some new computers with Win XP/Office 2003 were purchased to support other software that would not run under Win NT. Major upgrade (including new servers) due to go live around Labor Day. XP computers will likely stay and Win NT computers will be switched out for Win 7, but Office will be 2010 accross the board. Training staff has conducted surveys for needs analysis and what users use at home to know their familiarity with newer tech. Classes and help desk support will be available.

dhuscha
dhuscha

We are only getting Office 2010 for power users and thats cause it comes free with our current purchases of 2007. As for the whole Docx format, We had the problem of constantly recieving them. For users who still have 2000(75%) we use openoffice for there docx needs. Everyone else has 2007. Our reasoning is it just works.

mckinnej
mckinnej

It works. Does what we need. Until that situation changes we won't be migrating (notice I didn't call it an upgrade). One thing for sure is we'll be skipping 2007.

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

There was no business case to support purchasing Office 2007. I know nothing about 2010.

rustyfoxau@yahoo.com.au
rustyfoxau@yahoo.com.au

It has taken users sometime to get their head around the ribbon interface, using trial software. So we stayed with Office XP. With Open Office new release with ribbon interface awe will test OO before considering Office 2010 due to cost and licensing issues and the myriad formats that are available in OO allows for great flexibility , it is surprising how many people are still running old apps and formats because they work the way they want

SiUk
SiUk

I agree that many users had problems switching to using the ribbon interface and for many, it was like learning office again from scratch. However, I don't think it is a good idea to avoid upgrading completely based on users not being comfortable with change as change can be a good thing and is part of making progress. For the Office 2007 release, we upgraded several 'power' users in the company first so they could get used to the software. This enabled us to fix compatibility issues such as .doc / .docx saving between external clients and internal staff (fixed by setting a group policy to default to .doc for a while and also rolling out the compatibility pack.) Also throwing in the MS 'Save as PDF' add-in made the power users highlight the good points about the software to other users. These power users were then able to support minor queries within their team about getting used to the ribbon bar without contacting the IT Dept. Financially, times are harder for us now so we really so we will probably look to upgrade to 2010 a little later than usual. Also we have not yet evaluated the benefits that Office 2010 will give us yet.

alcmtr
alcmtr

I bought 07 because i got it at a good $. Little did I know what a hassle it was going to be. I am still learning it! I'm, technically, not a power user; but I know my software. I don't believe in putting people in learning curves just to be doing something different. I have seen too many problems created by this kind of thing. Yes some of it is because people resist change. But, IMO, much of it is because it simply doesn't need to be done. WordPerfect, for instance, uses the same setup but improves upon the functionality of the commands. This allows end users to do what they've always done but in a better way. The "changes" are transparent to them and creates improved output and gives the end user what they expected. All Microsoft, in their overwhelming desire to be everything to everyone, is to create confusion, annoyance, and frustration. Without WordPerfect, Lotus 1-2-3, or dBase products--and even IBM--Microsoft would not have had the capability of being what they are today. And IMO the only reason Microsoft is where they are is because of aggressive marketing tactics--they were the precursor of Walmart.

SirWizard
SirWizard

Making users temporarily uncomfortable through forcing them to learn a new user interface is an acceptable long-term cost, if there are substantial user benefits as a result, such as improved ease of use, increased functionality, or increased productivity. But the ribbon interface does not provide these for many users, especially power users, of which I am one. None of these ribbon attributes are beneficial compared to the standard menus and toolbars (Office 2003) UI: reduced screen real estate, an inconsistent interface hierarchy, decreased customizability, decreased usability, bungled printing/preview, and a radically enhanced potential for repetitive motion injury (because nearly everything takes many more clicks.) With my heavily customized Word and Excel 2-line toolbars, (150 buttons in use with room for approximately 37 more without going to three lines), virtually everything I do requires but a single click. In Word, single button clicks that I use often include: any of 9 specific fonts, any of 25 specific styles, restart (or continue) numbering, paste unformatted, insert a cross-reference, insert a caption, access the old style (functional) thesaurus, get a word count, print just the current page, and so on. In Excel, a button click enables me to do any of: insert rows (or columns), delete rows (or columns), set row (or column) width, paste values, freeze panes, center text vertically, set diagonal cell borders, set the print area, and so on. So, what is it that Office 2007 or 2010 will do for me to make my life easier or more productive, if only I'd spend the money to buy it and take the time to muck around with the ribbon? (Hint: nothing!)

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