Software

Repeat a table heading row at the beginning of each page

When you have a Word table that spans multiple pages, you'll probably want the header row to appear at the top of each page. Luckily, repeating a heading row across several pages takes only a few quick clicks.

Sometimes, what seems to be a difficult problem has an easy built-in solution. I ran into that recently with a Word table that was several pages long. Of course, I wanted to repeat the table's header row at the top of each page. That way, readers didn't have to return to the table's first page to learn what type of data was in a particular column. I had to stop and think for a minute, as I couldn't remember ever doing this before.

Customized menus make it easy to miss built-in features. If you don't use the item occasionally, Word doesn't display the item on the menu! It's less than intuitive, but I went back to the Table menu and clicked the double arrow to display all the menu items and there it was -- Heading Rows Repeat.

To use this feature, simply click inside the header row and choose Heading Rows Repeat from the Table menu. It couldn't be simpler. Word then displays the heading row at the top of every page as long as the table continues.

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About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

8 comments
BSA77
BSA77

I'm pretty adept at using Word - but I've encountered a problem with table headers that has got me stumped.  I have a long street listing for a subdivision in our town, listing residents by Street, House #, name, and telephone number. 

Each street name is a major header within the table.  When a street listing breaks to the next page I want the street name to appear at the top of the next page. 

Realizing that a table cannot have multiple, different headers, my solution was to split the large table into multiple tables with that Street Name as the header row for each table.  I then formatted the blank line between the two tables to be Exactly 1 pt (Format ->Paragraph).  The space between the 2 tables is only slightly visible (if you know its there) and mades the tables appear to be one table with a double line between the Street name header and the previous address. 

Then I designated the Street Name row for each table as the Repeating Header.  This worked fine for about 5 streets (tables).  But I cannot get it to work for the remaining 15 tables (streets).  Is there a maximum number of table headers one can have within a document?  As I said, it's got me stumped!  Thanks for any help.

fledis
fledis

Heading Rows Repeat is a good feature, but... According to our rules of formatting such big documents as Bachelor (Master) Theses, each part of the table must have a phrase "Continuation of Table x" or "End of Table x" at the top of each page. Heading rows are repeating correctly regardless of adding or deleting table rows. But how to set this phrase?

larrybell_2000
larrybell_2000

Sue, I had to laugh when I read your post about putting header rows in WORD tables at the top of each page. This was much like your (our) discussion back in late September about graphics in Excel headers ("Print a graphic in an Excel header ? sort of") While I don't use tables in Word any more than I absolutely have to (I have trouble with them formatting like I want), I am sure that I will find your tip helpful if and when I venture in to trying tables in Word again. But I felt honored by a specific use of a word or phrase in your post. It was same term I used back in Sept with the Excel header issue. And I was convinced that you recalled it from my previous post. Your comment "It?s less than intuitive, but ...", was just like my comment " Excel headers ARE just as flexible as in Word, though maybe not quite as intuitive". Just the use of 'intuitive' struck me funny, as kind of a 'wink wink, I remember what you said last time about headers' kind of thing. Maybe you didn't really mean it that way, and that is just fine. But I felt honored you remembered (visualize a polite bow to you). I'll have to go back and read more of your fine tips. I know I need, and could learn more about the advanced features in Word I haven't taken the time to learn or figured out (fillable forms and form letters, tables, mail merge, etc). I really enjoyed the things I learned doing the project in Excel. It may even help me get a new job! Keep teaching us Sue. Larry

ssharkins
ssharkins

I don't see any way to format that line -- I think you'll need some VBA code. I'm sure it can be done, but I don't have the code. Maybe a reader will offer something???? :) Does the phrase go in the document header, or does it need to be the actual table?

ssharkins
ssharkins

Thanks Larry -- I'm glad you like the tip. As for the phrase, "less than intuitive" -- when in the Office realm I find I use it a lot. You'll find my posts littered with it; perhaps I use it too much! I think that for the most part, Office apps do a good job of putting the most popular commands in easy and "intuitive" spots, but honestly... sometimes I wonder who thinks up their menu hierarchies... certainly not people who actually use their products. :)

fledis
fledis

This phrase must be befor the each part of the table on every new page. It can't be document header, I suppose, because I can't create different header for some pages unless I make a section of the document. The main problem is- the text in the document can be changed (deleting/adding), so the table breaks across pages differently. Now, for example, below the sixth row of the table, and after some changes- below the eights row, and after some more changes it may be fit the page exactly and don't break at all. In that case there won't be a need for this phrase. Column headings will be repeated correctly in each case, while any other constructions... By the way, it's impossible to add some text lines above the repeated headings, unless I make a text box on the white margin of the page.

fledis
fledis

This phrase must be befor the each part of the table on every new page. It can't be document header, I suppose, because I can't create different header for some pages unless I make a section of the document. The main problem is- the text in the document can be changed (deleting/adding), so the table breaks across pages differently. Now, for example, below the sixth row of the table, and after some changes- below the eights row, and after some more changes it may be fit the page exactly and don't break at all. In that case there won't be a need for this phrase. Column headings will be repeated correctly in each case, while any other constructions...