Software

What version of Office are you using and supporting?

Are you still supporting Office 2003 or an even earlier version or has your organization moved on to 2007 or 2010?
It's been a while since our last poll regarding versions. I don't want to limit you to a single response, so this time… no poll. I'd like to know which version(s) of Office you're currently using and supporting and if you plan to upgrade to 2010. For the most part, I still have few clients using 2007, let alone 2010. The network of consultants I work with report the same thing -- they are still supporting 2003 more than any other version. A few are still supporting Office 97 applications! So how do 2007 and 2010 fit into your organization's scheme?

About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

107 comments
wobblyo
wobblyo

We have Office 2003, 2007 & 2010. I am currently evaluating Office 2010, the company PCs are on 2007 & a client provided laptop is still running 2003. I think the jump from 2003 to 2010 is worthwhile, but maybe not from 2007 to 2010, unless you want the enhanced network & shared document working facilities.

jasondlnd
jasondlnd

Our offices mostly use 2003, with a few people using 2007. Biggest complaints that come from the people using 2007 include "I used to be able to do stuff with a single click and now have to hunt for it", "The ribbon is so counter productive", and "Access doesn't work as well in 2007 as it did in 2000 and 2003". These comments are still coming in after these users have been using 2007 for 2 years. 2007 and 2010 are versions of office that are built for geeks and techs, not everyday users, which is they type of people that typically use Office. Microsoft may wonder why the iPad and the iPhone are taking off...they're built for everyday users, the same type of people that use office 2003 on a daily basis.

WinterT
WinterT

Office 2003, moving to Office 2010

mike.smith
mike.smith

Currently supporting Office XP, but we're considering upgrading to Office 2010 within the next year or two.

liljim
liljim

I support quite a few local small businesses and local Governments. Accordingly I have used and supported everything from Wordperfect to Office 2007. IMHO Office 2007 is a terrible piece of software. ON the same hardware, it seems much slower than Office 2003. The ribbons are not conducive to fast efficient usage. I encourage anyone who takes the time to ask, to get the 2003 Edition at bargain basement prices and pass when the upgrade offers for 2007 and 2010 come along. I have yet to see either of the new products show me anything I need, that justify the costs of redeploying and relearning the application. Don't reinvent the wheel, Microsoft, when you have yet to really fix the glitches in your existing product line. But of course, that interferes with the money printing machine call Microsoft Patch Tuesday.

Randy Gleason
Randy Gleason

Office 2003, Hopefully moving to 2010 this year

pjboyles
pjboyles

IT here supports MS Office XP and MS Outlook 2007. The only item with features that enticed upgrading is Outlook. I have used all of them. And we have a smattering of versions across our users from Office 95 on up as specific applications have required a specific version of an MS Office application. The issues to upgrading MS Office are cost and cost. The cost of MS Office itself, the cost of learning a new version and the cost of all the applications that tie into MS Office. As to Office 2007 (and 2010) with the ribbon, what idiot thought that was better. Learn pictograms rather than words. And all the people who worked in the applications that knew all the keyboard shortcuts hate you! Also, that ity bitty arrow in the lower right corner to see the rest of the panel, what a miss. Plans on upgrading... when Microsoft ends support for Office XP then to Office 2010. And the business will ride it out as long as possible on Office XP due to the large total cost of migrating.

rlopes
rlopes

We are supporting about half and half (Office 2003 and Office 2007) district-wide--slowly migrating our three colleges to 2007.

lockhaca
lockhaca

I work at the Administrative Offices for a school district. We use Office 2007. The Technology Department offers miminal support and some training. Do not know what plans are for Office 2010. We've only had 2007 about 1-1/2 years.

dhaley
dhaley

We skipped Office 2003 ~ Still have several Office XP, but are working towards all Office 2007. Since we are still working to get all updated to 2007, I don't see us moving to Office 2010 anytime soon.

lynnembailey
lynnembailey

I really like using PPT 03 for its ease of use of drawing tools and ability to pull out toolbars, supports pattern fills. 07 has nice touches (and I'm sure 10 is similar)but I still find it difficult to find tools that I have used for over a decade, and sometimes they are not as good.

draphael
draphael

About 2/3 of our staff are on Office 2007 and the others are still on Office 2000 due to some issues with legacy software.

dmckowen3
dmckowen3

Office 2007 is used in two of our companies while 2003 is still used in the third. Personally I use 20007 and Open Office 3.1, which is what I also have my mother using for her business.

bbaker
bbaker

Won't move to 2010 until we know other applications will work with i

Cheo
Cheo

Using 2010, supporting 2003 and 2007.

stigfurudal
stigfurudal

We are using 2007 Small Business (Norwegian), in addition to the 2003 PowerPoint (some issue with older presentations still in use by our engineers). We are considering an upgrade to 2010 within the next 12 months.

bhaven23
bhaven23

2002, 2003, 2007. Fun mixing them all.

muzikdruid
muzikdruid

We Toyed with 2007 but are working on deploying straight to 2010.

lasaboy
lasaboy

Office 2003 with no thought of changing or upgrading

bcbaking
bcbaking

The lion's share of computers in my office are using Office 2003; with about 3% using Office 2007. I am currently using Office 2010 Beta on my 2 office notebook computers, and I will be upgrading these to the final 2010 Office next month.

firstaborean
firstaborean

Here, it's Word 2002, which was also part of Office XP, but no other portion of the Office suite. Why? It's the most-nearly bug-free version of Word I've ever come across, and the newer versions' features aren't needed.

Leo
Leo

I've been running 2007 for about 3 years now. 100% of clients desktops. But we wont be upgrading to 2010 becuase we no longer have a MSFT licence agreement. Sign of the times i guess. :-( :-)

Rob C
Rob C

I have asked this site repeatedly to blank out the Title box, so that we MUST type our own unique Title. My request has fallen on deaf ears. If you do not type your own meaningful Tile, I am pretty sure that many people will not read your post. If they are like me (or are very busy), they will just scan the Titles, to see if any are of interest to them. Sorry for double post. I intended this to appear next to the recent posts, that did not have meaningful Titles

cutting
cutting

At home: 2007 Student & Home At work: 2007 Professional (Boss uses 2003 - doesn't have the time to learn 2007.) It didn't take long to convert my brain to think 2007.

brupub
brupub

I now support 2003, 2007 and MAC 2008 and will probably add 2010 - it worked extremely well during my Beta testing

serenitywizard
serenitywizard

Still using 2003...as in XP...if it ain't broke, don't fix it!

QuiMoi
QuiMoi

We are using Office 2003. None of us here like the interface for 2007. However, after we finish upgrading to Windows 7 we will probably switch to Office 2010.

dutch_gemini
dutch_gemini

Developing Add-Ins for Excel 2000 up to 2010, provided 2010 is programmatically equivalent to 2007.

Lazarus439
Lazarus439

Probably won't install 2010 as long as we can install and maintain 2003 and/or 2007. We do buy from an Open license program just for this reason.

dleippe
dleippe

Open Office since version 2.0, and I not going back to MS Office...

scallahan58
scallahan58

Switched from Office to Open Office.Free and easier for a new user to learn. Less training cost, and less software cost. No-brainer.

nasboy
nasboy

Fidling with OpenOffice.org as upgrade.

andy
andy

Office 2000 and 2003 partially due to costs and partially because most of the users do not need extended functionality. Next year we are migrating everyone to Office 2010 after they all attend a "basics" class to know what they are in for.

ambfts
ambfts

2007 - unhappy with Outlook as it slows to a crawl and/or crashes with regularity. Otherwise - looking forward to 2010 in the hope that these problems are fixed - maybe (MS - are you listening????)

lafreightman
lafreightman

Office 2003. We are soon going to working in a cave.

rcameron1
rcameron1

Office 2003 for Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Still using Outlook 2000 due to legacy software compatibility. Hope to upgrade to 2010

lnchome
lnchome

on the server side for all user we use office 2000, other user use office 2007 and a very small amount use 2010. 90% office 2000 9% office 2007 1% office 2010. we will be moving to server 2008 and hope to move up to office 2007.

lcdoesit
lcdoesit

Ongoing budget cuts may bring us to use Open Office and Google Docs exclusively in the future.

dwdino
dwdino

2010 is in testing while office 1000+ has been migrated to 2007.

Rob C
Rob C

I was a business analyst, and systems analyst for nearly 20 years. If we had arrogantly done such major changes to our programs, without consideration of the effect on usability, the users would have been shocked. And the fact that MS did not provide the option to revert to Menus (and hide that horrible Ribbon), is appalling. Not to mention the fact that THEY decided to use some of our available screen space, for their Ribbon.

carlsf
carlsf

From the postings here my option to stay with OFFICE 2003 PRO was the correct one. I have to ask why after 3 years MS have NOT fixed the posted 2007 probems here still have NOT been fixed. Comments about the "RIBBON" agree not good. As for 2010 the "RIBBON" is still there and as they (MS) have not fixed 2007 problems, we will skip 2010 and continue with 2003 PRO.

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

I teach Office 2007 but to be honest once you get used to where everything is with Office 2007, it is hard to go back to Office 2003. There are a lot of cool features in Office 2007 including how Word 2007 handles references.

lsangree
lsangree

16 months on 2007 - 10 users mostly like it - especially table (list) features Will swith to 2010 if it solves REAL problems with: LINKS - MS has advised us to save as 2003 format because this is a KNOWN bug in 2007 HEADERS - format/spacing changes every time AutoRecover runs but only in some documents - messes up page layouts, very annoying

Glenn from Iowa
Glenn from Iowa

is the easiest and most stable version of Word I've come across. And I'll bet I could do 99%+ of what I need to with it!

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

Though it doesn't bother me like it appears to bother you, I do breeze over the posts that do not change the title.

carlsf
carlsf

read these posts and TAKE NOTICE. Oh well another wish that did NOT happen

DBlayney
DBlayney

We have just recently rolled out Office 2007 with few problems (5,000 users world-wide), it replaced Office XP (2002) and Office 10 is not even being discussed yet. A Windows 7 rollout is being prepared for late 2010/early 2011. We took the trouble to run training for all users and many have quickly adapted to the Ribbon, partly because they have been taught to use it and partly because it works well for non-expert users. Personally, I have it permanently hidden (Ctrl-F1) and use the remaining menu bar as I did with Excel XP but with a much richer choice than the old drop-down lists. In XP I used several custom toolbars (my only gripe with 2007 is that I can't do that any more) but I manage with a very long Quick Access Toolbar now.

wwgorman
wwgorman

I agree with you wholeheartedly. Microsoft is customer deaf. I tried Office 2007 and hated it even with the third party menu program. I'm back to using Office 2003. I saw nothing but problems with Office 2007 and no advantages. Now, if Microsoft had improved Excel even further with, say, an improved Histogram capability I might have kept it installed. I saw nothing new in functions and a decrease in functionality with "The Ribbon." It is likely that Ballmer has hanged himself with "The Ribbon."

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