Wi-Fi

Time to buy 802.11n Draft 2 devices


802.11n Draft 2 devices for the SOHO market are substantially better than Draft 1 equipment according to recent testing by NetworkWorld and Farpoint Group. NetworkWorld and Farpoint Group used their testing of Draft 1 devices last year as the reference point on which they based their conclusions.The 802.11n Draft 1 test results were published in this August 7, 2006 NetworkWorld article and were not very inspiring:

"We found a disappointingly broad range of variability in throughput and generally poor interoperability among so-called "Draft 1-compliant" products-not an entirely unexpected result given the lack of any form of third-party interoperability certification."

Products used in the 802.11n Draft 2 tests had to meet two pre-requisites-have at least one Gigabit Ethernet port and have received the Wi-Fi Alliance's Wi-Fi Draft N certification. In an October 1, 2007 NetworkWorld article, C.J. Mathias gives a break down of the test results along with optimistic support for Draft 2 equipment:

"This year's products-representing the latest from Belkin, D-Link, Linksys, Netgear and SMC-with a few exceptions, did much better in the interoperability department, and we occasionally saw performance better than the best of last year's crop."

The Wi-Fi Alliance appears to have made a difference with the Draft 2 devices' performance. Improved interoperability between vendors was mentioned as being paramount to the "across the board" improvement. The time may now be right to buy 802.11n devices. "Overall, it's clear the WLAN industry is making progress," wrote Mathias, "And there's no good reason not to go with 802.11n today."

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7 comments
est_mahdi
est_mahdi

We have two different domains actually we have two different DHCP servers . and our operating systems on both of servers are Windows 2000. and each of them has at least 150 clients. And these two servers have been connected via switch. Now imagine that one of our DHCP's IP is 192.168.84.1(A) and the other one is 192.168.90.1(B) . When A's clients want to get IP address instead of getting IP address from DHCP(A) they recieve IP address from DHCP(B). So a client in domain (A) that must get its IP from DHCP(A) and must be visible in this domain recieve its IP from DHCP (B).And we must unplug Server B from switch in order to force that client to get its IP from DHCP(A). what we can do that every client recives from its server ? Any help would be appreciated in advance.

dgs010243
dgs010243

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Smart_Neuron
Smart_Neuron

Crazy. I would never buy a Draft Standard. What the Wi-Fi Alliance should do is push their members hard to ratify much more quickly. This could have have been a done deal already!

Grossoc
Grossoc

I thought that I read that 802.11n is going to be moved into the 5.8 Ghtz band. Does anyone know if this is true and if so, what happens to all the equipment that was sold with 2.4 radios in them?

jsidebottom
jsidebottom

I bought the WRT350N Gigabit Linksys router and I love it. With the Linksys card in my laptop I am able to set on my back porch and get 270 Mps this is a far cry from 54 Mps. Simply put. I love it.

DadsPad
DadsPad

I like many of the features of the new N draft2, but it is still a draft. To invest in the technology at this time seems more like a test bed. Now, if an interprise wants to be a test bed, I am all for it. But to invest before the 802.11N standard is set still seems risky. This still seems of industry still promoting sales over reliablity of product.

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