Hardware

Dell Studio Hybrid PC

The Dell Studio Hybrid PC is a small form factor PC that retains much of the power found in large desktop computers. The compact design gives the Studio Hybrid a smaller desktop footprint than a notebook and even some netbooks.

The Dell Studio Hybrid PC is a small form factor PC that retains much of the power found in large desktop computers. The compact design gives the Studio Hybrid a smaller desktop footprint than a notebook and even some netbooks. With an Intel Core 2 Duo and 2GB of RAM, this may be all you need for your next workstation PC purchase.

Specifications

  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo, 2.1GHz
  • RAM: 2GB DDR2
  • Hard drive: 320GB
  • Intel Integrated Graphics Media Accelerator X3100
  • Slot Load CD / DVD Writer
  • On board high definition sound
  • Five USB 2.0 ports
  • Firewire (IEEE1394a) port (4-pin)
  • HDMI video connector
  • DVI video connector
  • Network connector 10/100/1000 (RJ45)
  • Digital Audio: S/P DIF Out
  • Analog Audio: Headphone (front); Line-in / Line-out (back)
  • 7-in-1 Media Reader
  • Standing vertical with stand (as pictured) — H 8" X W 3" X D 8.3"
  • Additional information
  • For a closer look, check out the Dell Studio Hybrid First Look Photo Gallery

Who is it for?

The Dell Studio Hybrid PC is designed to be a powerful computer in a stylish, small footprint package. This PC can perform the function of a typical low graphics-required workstation, but without the large rectangular box on or under the desk.

What problem does it solve?

If desktop real estate and aesthetics are a concern, at the receptionist's desk for example, the Dell Studio Hybrid PC is a safe bet. If a professional sleek office décor is important to your business, this small PC can be deployed unobtrusively anywhere a workstation is required.

Features

  • Small form factor: The power of a workstation in a package smaller than a bread basket.
  • Style: Available in many colors, the Dell Studio Hybrid PC can be deployed without infringing on the office décor.
  • Performance: With an Intel Core 2 Duo CPU, 2GB RAM, and a 320GB hard drive, the Dell Studio Hybrid PC has enough power for your average business workstation needs.
  • Digital output: With DVI or HDMI output, the Dell Studio Hybrid PC can be deployed without a multitude of cables.
  • USB 2.0 connections: There are five USB ports for connecting peripherals and flash drives.

What's wrong

  • Not expandable: With the Dell Studio Hybrid PC, what you see is what you get. There is no room for stand-alone graphics card or additional optical drives.
  • Lack of 3D graphics: With the Intel integrated graphic chip set, the graphical performance, especially in terms of three dimensions, is marginal at best. You could not use the Dell Studio Hybrid PC for almost any graphical workstation.
  • Cost: At $750 for our review model, the Dell Studio Hybrid PC is definitely in the highest-price range. If you want style to go along with your performance, you are going to have to pay the premium.

Competitive products

Bottom line for business

The Dell Studio Hybrid PC is very capable small form-factor machine. For the traditional workstation relying on e-mail, office software, and data entry applications, this computer will surely handle the workload. If style and office décor are important, a Dell Studio Hybrid PC can be found that will meld with just about any style. However, because these machines are not expandable and tend to cost more than conventional workstation PCs, the Dell Studio Hybrid PC is really a niche item. If you don't have that niche to fill, it is likely more typical PC will have the better ROI.

User rating

Have you used and/or deployed the Dell Studio Hybrid PC? If so, what do you think? Rate the unit below and compare the results to what other TechRepublic members think. Give your own personal review of the unit in the TechRepublic Community Forum or let us know if you think we left anything out in our review.

About

Mark W. Kaelin has been writing and editing stories about the IT industry, gadgets, finance, accounting, and tech-life for more than 25 years. Most recently, he has been a regular contributor to BreakingModern.com, aNewDomain.net, and TechRepublic.

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