Software

Review: Auslogics Disk Defrag utility

Auslogics Disk Defrag combines useful features, scheduling, automatic defragmentation, and ease of use in a lightweight package.

There are a lot of disk defragmentation tools available on the market. Auslogics Disk Defrag combines useful features, scheduling, automatic defragmentation, and ease of use in a lightweight package that is free for home users.

Note: This review was performed with a business edition that the author paid for personally.

Specifications

  • Cost: Free for home use, $19.95 for business use, with significant volume discounts available
  • Hardware requirements: 50MB disk space, 32MB RAM
  • Operating system requirements: XP, Vista, 2008, 7
  • Additional information: Product Web site
  • TechRepublic Photo Gallery

Who's it for?

Disk defragmentation tools are needed by all users, but some will need them more than others. People who frequently add large files, or delete a lot of files (like people who install and uninstall a lot of applications, or download many media files) will need better tools and more frequent defragmentation than others. Gamers, enthusiasts, and other performance sensitive users will also want better defrag tools.

What problems does it solve?

The standard Windows defrag tool is extremely basic and does not perform all of the optimizations that other tools do. While this may be enough for some users, Auslogics Disk Defrag has many more useful features, without being overwhelming to the user.

Standout Features

  • Defrag Options: Auslogics Disk Defrag can defrag individual files, folders, and even consolidate free space. In addition, you can specify "auto defrag" to occur whenever the system is idle. It can even defrag more than one disk at a time.
  • Ease of Use: Despite having a good set of features for a defrag tool, the UI is easy to use and uncluttered.
  • Lightweight, performance: The application is small, runs fast, and analyzes and defrags quickly.
  • Cost: Auslogics Disk Defrag is free for home users, and very inexpensive for business users ($19.95 for individual licenses, and as low as $12.95 for large volume orders).
  • USB Version: Disk Defrag Portable, a non-install version that can be run directly from portable media. It is a separate download for home users and business users also get a license with their paid license for Disk Defrag.

What's wrong?

None: This reviewer did not find anything to not like.

Competitive Products

Window Defrag

Bottom line for business

A few months ago, we ran a number of Product Spotlight pieces on disk defrag tools, and one consistency is that for each article we published, many readers kept talking about Auslogics Disk Defrag. It is really unusual to see that many people saying such nice things about a product, so we decided to give it a look, and the praise is justified!

Not only does Auslogics Disk Defrag work as expected, it works better than expected. For example, on my test system, Windows Disk Defragment said that my C: drive was 2% fragmented; Auslogics Disk Defrag showed that it was actually 10% defragmented. I have looked at almost every disk defrag tool on the market, and unless I am forgetting something, Disk Defrag has every single feature that I have found in every other tool. Combined with its low price (again, free for home users, and from $19.95 - $12.95 for business use, depending on volume), that is an outstanding value.

Everything about this application is easy and obvious. The options make sense, and are well explained for people who are not as savvy about disk defrag as a PC technician would be. It takes about a minute to run through all of the dialogs, options, and features and become acquainted with them. Even ordering the software is easy, as there is no registration or licensing to do. There is absolutely nothing bad to be said for this application.

User rating

Have you encountered or used Auslogics Disk Defrag? If so, what do you think? Rate your experience and compare the results to what other TechRepublic members think. Give your own personal review in the TechRepublic Community Forums or let us know if you think we left anything out in our review.

Read our field-tested reviews of hardware and software in TechRepublic's Product Spotlight newsletter, delivered each Thursday. We explain who would use the product and describe what problem the product is designed to solve. Automatically sign up today!

Next Page (Photo Gallery) >>

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

20 comments
dal765
dal765

Like most free defrag utilities it doesn't defrag the MFT. However, watch this space... they are working on this, says the web site..

PoppaTab
PoppaTab

I use Auslogic Defrag. I began using it after seeing and trying many of the defrag utilities posted on TR. Defraggler was slow, I had been using that up until I decided to test others. Diskeeper wanted money! LOL. Smart was ok, but the AL defrag scratched my itch. I use it on Windows 7 Pro and XP, it works quite well for me.

RechTepublic
RechTepublic

I ran a similar test where I had a fragged computer and installed serveral defrag programs to see the difference in reporting. I used all the defrags in this blog, except Norton, and found that O&O reported the highest level of fragementation of them all. It has some unique defrag option such as organizing files alphabetically or by frequency of use. Haven't needed to install it on Windows 7 since it defrags automatically and I haven't encountered any performce issues...yet.

jfuller05
jfuller05

I use Auslogics Disk Defrag and I have no complaints. I haven't experienced some of the issues that a user or two have had in this forum. So, until I do I have no complaints with this tool.

Prague
Prague

I've used the Auslogics Disk Defragmenter for several years and find it reliable and fast. So I recently tried the screensaver version Auslogics puts out on my Vista Home home PC. It hung up on me twice so that I needed to hard boot my PC; the second time it happened my PC wouldn't boot up and required UBCD4WIN work to get it back. This may be some issue with my PC, but the fact remains that it would not end for me, nor did it appear to be doing anything, requiring a hard boot with a corrupted disk as a result. Just not worth it for a 'nice to have' type of utility.

Slayer_
Slayer_

3 different systems, and after 3 full defrags and optimizations, Windows refused to boot up properly. Explorer would always hang a few seconds into the bootup. On my Laptop, a hard-shutdown was needed. On my desktops, a simple log off and log back in (after end tasking explorer) fixed it. I don't see any visible performance gains, despite my HDDs having ~60% fragmentation. But it did do all 6 of my drives at once, so that's good. Even WHILE I watched the Olympic games.

Slayer_
Slayer_

C++ libraries, .Net, Java, etc. Any of those?

Snurre
Snurre

I use the free version for home users and absolutely love it. Well done Auslogics! Justin, please correct the typo in the first sentence - "desk defragmentation tools".

Somewhiteguy
Somewhiteguy

considering there are several other defrag utilities that are free and do the same amount of work. I use Defraggler from Piriform.com

PoppaTab
PoppaTab

I tried to use Ultra, but it would not install on my Win 7 Pro 64 bit. Otherwise I would have tried that.

seanferd
seanferd

If you chose to Optimize as well as defrag: It moved some system files, and Windows was "getting used to" the new placement, or moving them again. It was moving some files on boot.

Justin James
Justin James

I haven't had that problem. It would be interesting to know what the root cause is. My first impulse is to say that it moved a piece of data onto a failing drive sector, but that's pretty improbable to happen on three different machines. J.Ja

seanferd
seanferd

I'm pretty sure it's a requirement. XP or later, at a guess, for the current versions. No other dependencies (although I could imagine someone coming up with an unholy .NET-based defrag, this isn't it). Portable version, if you like.

Justin James
Justin James

... I wouldn't know because I already have the VC redist., .NET 3.5, and Java installed on my test machine anyways. J.Ja

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Thanks for seeing and reporting that - it is corrected now.

Snurre
Snurre

Auslogics Disk Defrag is free for home users - you should read more attentively. And the fact that it's not free for businesses is just fair.

jeslurkin
jeslurkin

I got into Ultra after using Auslogics for a while. The thing I liked was that it took 1/2 the time of Auslogics,... _and_ Auslogics took 1/2 the time of Winders defrag. Ultra does leave a few (probably 'in-use') files still fragged. I was not aware of the auto-defrag setting on Auslogics at the time. (Just learned from this article.) When I found out about the auto-defrag in Smart Defrag, I started using it. (I gave Diskeeper a trial. It keeps running in the background, and so it slows down the whole system.) I shall now try Auslogics Auto-defrag (if it will run on W2K), and perhaps go back to it. I like all three (Auslogics, Smart, and Ultra).

Slayer_
Slayer_

Windows XP does have that option, by default, to defrag system files so the computer boots faster, turned on. Maybe that's what it was doing. But it was strange, can't tell on the desktop (No Disk I/O lights), but on the Laptop, it looked completely locked, no disk access at all.

seanferd
seanferd

And here, I had my hopes up. Some of us could really use one of those. :D