Linux

Review: Gadmintools suite of configuration utilities

The Gadmintools set of administration/configuration tools are for any Linux administrator needing a fast, simple means of configuring various systems.

If you are a Linux system administrator you can understand when I say that sometimes it would be nice if there was a really great set of standard GUI tools for configuring X. Of course there are plenty of GUI tools, but when you're switching from Samba, to DHCPD, to RSYNC, to SQUID, to OpenVPN Server it would certainly help to have a set of tools with the same, user-friendly interface. You're in luck. The Gadmintools suite of configuration utilities is there to save the day. With these easy-to-install/use graphical front-ends, you can have a number of often-complex systems up and running in no time.

Specifications

Who's it for?

The Gadmintools set of administration/configuration tools are for any Linux administrator needing a fast, simple means of configuring various systems on Linux machine. Gadmintools requires at least a mid-level knowledge of Linux since some of the tools offered configure fairly complex systems.

What problem does it solve?

Gadmintools solves a number of problems that all fall under the umbrella of offering an administrator an easy to use, graphical front-end that allows them to get often-complicated systems up and running. Instead of manually editing your smb.conf file, let Gadmin Samba take care of it. Instead of editing your apache2.conf file by hand, let Gadmin Apache tackle that task.

Standout features

  • Standardized interface across all tools
  • Simple installation through Synaptic (or any package manager)
  • User-friendly
  • Remote server administration by tunneling X with ssh
  • Free

What's wrong?

Of course the biggest problem is the lack of support. Yes the administrator can get on line and Google-search all day, but when something really goes wrong, the IT consultant knows the fault lies completely on their shoulders. The lack of support will turn a lot of SMB and Enterprise users off of Gadmintools. And because the Gadmintools is all GUI, those headless Linux servers won't benefit from their use.

Competitive products

Bottom line for business

If you employ Linux for various server systems (or even only one system), it behooves you to give the Gadmintools a try. Not only will these tools make your job easier, they will make setting up and administering those systems far more efficient.

User rating

Have you encountered or used Gadmintools? If so, what do you think? Rate your experience and compare the results to what other TechRepublic members think. Give your own personal review in the TechRepublic Community Forums or let us know if you think we left anything out in our review.

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About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

2 comments
Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I find Webmin a fantastic admin front end without needing a full X on the machine or anything more than a web browser on my local end. It was overwhelming at first but start by creating a webmin user account with modules enabled for only what is installed (eg. if you don't have apache installed, don't enable the apache management module). A well layed out distribution can also be very easy to manage through command line. I've even done some rsync scripts to pull common config files down to multiple systems (or push them out). If the article's tool can be installed on my local machine then reach out to remote X'less servers, it could also be a handy tool as it gains support for more packages.

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