Disaster Recovery optimize

Review: LuckyBackup for Linux systems

With a user-friendly GUI, LuckyBackUp is one of the easiest backup tools you will ever use on a Linux system.

Backups are a crucial aspect of any PC users work. No matter if you are a home user who uses the PC for home banking or a data center administrator who depends upon backups as the go-to failsafe for petabytes of company data, without a backup you could find yourself dead in the water.

On the Windows side of things there are tons of backup tools available. On the Linux side there are also plenty of backup solutions, but many of them center on complex command-line driven tools. Many Linux users don't want to have to deal with the command line, or the complexity of a tool like Amanda.

There needs to be an alternative that can make backing up a Linux system simple. That alternative exists in the form of LuckyBackUp, which is one of the easiest backup tools you will ever use on a Linux system. It has a user-friendly GUI and can back up locally, to a locally attached drive, or across a network. But how well does LuckyBackUp perform? And is this tool right for you? Let's find out.

Requirements

  • libqtcore4 greater than or equal to 4.4
  • libqtgui4 greater than or equal to 4.4
  • lib6 OR glibc greater than or equal to 2.7-1
  • libgcc1 greater than or equal to 4.1.1
  • libstdc++6 greater than or equal to 4.1.1
  • rsync
  • ssh (optional)
  • LuckyBackUp Web site
  • TechRepublic Photo Gallery

Who's it for?

LuckyBackUp is for any Linux desktop (or server with a GUI) user who needs to do quick and easy backup, but needs said backup to be reliable, schedule-able, and flexible.

What problem does it solve?

With LuckyBackUp the Linux user has, at their fingertips, the ability to do different types of multiple backups with a simple GUI interface. These backups can be scheduled, as well as be full backups or synchronized. And what's best is that LuckyBackUp doesn't require years of Linux experience to work. In fact, LuckyBackUp is easy enough for nearly any level of experience, so users of all levels can have reliable backups.

Standout features

  • Easy to use GUI
  • Local or remote backups
  • Remote using rsync or ssh
  • Scheduled backups
  • Include/Exclude filters
  • Backup simulator
  • Backup validation

What's wrong?

The biggest problem with LuckyBackUp is, when using SSH for remote backup, the user has to enter their password for the SSH server. The only way around this is to set up password-less secure shell authentication. Having to enter a password for a ssh remote connection is fine, unless you are doing a scheduled backup. If you want to do scheduled backups using ssh, you will have to set up keyfile authentication for secure shell.

Competitive products

Bottom line for business

If your Linux machines need a solid, GUI-based backup, you need to look at LuckyBackUp. Its flexibility and ease of use cannot be matched in any GUI-based Linux application. And just because LuckyBackUp is geared toward ease of use, doesn't mean it can't handle larger jobs. If your server has a GUI, LuckyBackUp can easily take care of that as well.

User rating

Have you encountered or used Beyond Compare? If so, what do you think? Rate your experience and compare the results to what other TechRepublic members think. Give your own personal review in the TechRepublic Community Forums or let us know if you think we left anything out in our review.

Read our field-tested reviews of hardware and software in TechRepublic's Product Spotlight newsletter, delivered each Thursday. We explain who would use the product and describe what problem the product is designed to solve. Automatically sign up today!

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

15 comments
hkphooey
hkphooey

A similar product is Backintime. Very easy to setup and run. However there is one major difference. Rather than just cloning the backup directory, Backintime creates a series of snapshots (using the famous rsync + hardlinks trick), which means you can roll back to any point in time, which is obviously an asset. It works rather like the Mac Time Machine. http://backintime.le-web.org/

wyllys
wyllys

I discovered LuckyBackup about six weeks ago and have been using it daily ever since. So far its performance has been excellent.

misceng
misceng

This review illustrates why Linux with all its benefits does not get the ordinary user interested. Requirements libqtcore4 greater than or equal to 4.4 libqtgui4 greater than or equal to 4.4 lib6 OR glibc greater than or equal to 2.7-1 libgcc1 greater than or equal to 4.1.1 libstdc++6 greater than or equal to 4.1.1 rsync Which non expert Linux user is going to know whether their system can use the program because like me they do not know about any of the lib.... referred to in the requirements?

scowen
scowen

Have been using this for the last year and it does what it says on the tin. Use it for for home desktop backup and work laptop works a treat.

Jaqui
Jaqui

my backup tool of choice. make me them there tarballs of the data and put it onto dvd and a storage hard drive.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

What is your Linux-based back-up application of choice?

john3347
john3347

Thank you for pointing out this fact. This is one more prime example why all the Linux versions remain "by Geeks, for Geeks" 'til this day and seemingly for many days to come.

kpbarry
kpbarry

the article was focusing on the application's ease of use. There are thousands of free open source apps that are a simple one click install for some linux distributions (like Ubuntu with Ubuntu Software Center). If you have never seen it in action, I would recommend trying it, you might be surprised. LuckyBackup may not be in Ubuntu's official repositories yet, but a quick Google search finds articles on setting it up using unofficial repositories (and apt-get from the command line). It may not be a one click install, but it shouldn't be too difficult either. http://www.howtoforge.com/creating-backups-with-luckybackup-on-an-ubuntu-9.04-desktop

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Non expert users should be installing through the distribution package manager which will automatically confirm or install that list of dependencies. It's not like the Windows/osX world where the entry level method of install is going to any old untrusted website and going it alone. Ubuntu has clear Add/Remove Software. Debian has Synaptic. Mandriva has rpmdrake. Other distributions have there own GUI package managers. There's really no reason for a non-expert to be mucking about with the dependency list.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

If I could get Bacula up and working I'd be all over that. Centralized management, client application available for multiple OS platforms, not likely to be outgrown as the client base expands. Need to have a look for a clear howto and give it a third go. At the moment, I'm just using some homebuilt bash scripts to create dated tarbzips with a separate process to remove old backups as they build up. It works for now but it's far from a nice baremetal recovery image and backup restore.

pgit
pgit

Bacula has remained incomprehensible to me so far. I've spent a couple weeks on and off with it in the lab, probably taken 3 solid stabs at it over the years. It's one of those things that looks so promising (like nagios) but sorely lacks clear documentation. Someone showing me a working system hands-on would be the ideal solution. Unfortunately nobody around here uses it, or Linux (much) for that matter.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Not to draw readers away but I think the OSNews article and resulting discussion is worth considering. " The real issue here is that bloggers and the press are jumping on this security problem pointing fingers specifically at Linux, when in reality Linux has little to do with this Trojan; the problem is really UnrealIRCd's. This security issue shouldn't even be front-page news, but I'm putting it here in a sort of challenge to the rest of the media and to set anyone straight on the matter. Syzop himself, our friend from earlier, states it perfectly: On an unrelated side note, I find the claims in various media that this security incident indicates that Linux and Open Source cannot be trusted and that Microsoft and closed-software is better really silly. It lacks any foundation. A hacker, once in, could just as easily have inserted the backdoor in Windows software. In fact, it is *THANKS* to it being Open Source that this backdoor got noticed, though - I fully agree - much too late. Every operating system-- and every software, for that matter-- is not completely invulnerable no matter how many brick walls get built around it. Breaches in Linux security are going to happen from time to time-- and this wasn't necessarily a breach in Linux security, as I already stated; this is a breach in UnrealIRCd security. Bloggers saying that this is a Linux problem I think I can safely classify in one of three areas: 1. They want to create more hype than is actually there, thus bringing more attraction to their websites or their person 2. They really don't like Linux and/or open-source 3. They don't know what the heck they're talking about " http://www.osnews.com/story/23448/Linux_IRC_Server_Gets_Trojan_Press_Harps_On_Linux_Security

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

zdnet is not the best source for a balanced technical report on the issue. Consider this though; Gentoo included the Unreal IRC Server built with the backdoor in place. The patched update is already available in the core repositories and propagating to mirrors. Gentoo users normal update process will deliver the clean package soon if it's not already come in through there repository. I have to give the IRC server developers credit for being publicly open about the issue also. They came right out and said "boy are we embarrassed.. ok. here's the issue we've found and are fixing.." With the MS vulnerability that's been the topic of discussion until now, I said that public disclosure was desirable and MS should have it's feet to the fire until the patch is released. I stand by that here also; public disclosure allows IRC administrators to mitigate the vulnerability and prepare for the patch package or go fetch source and build it themselves. Had the fix not already been available, I'd be expecting there feet to the fire until it was available. It actually demonstrates that repository distribution works better and responds faster to such issues. Nothing is perfect but the history of repository distribution has been pretty solid compared to infection rates through other methods. I would be curious to see a list of distributions effected by the issue though. Debian lists no packages containing "unreal" in the name. But of course the media will spin and milk it for all the clicks and views they can rack up. Sensationalize, sensationalize, sensationalize; regardless of the facts. Same for any major platform these days really.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I've had my head stuck into some other puzzles recently; Metasploitable since last Sunday, WinXPsp0, DeICE1.100 and DeICE1.110 over the weekend for review, started my first go at DeICE2.100 late yesterday. (Need more pentarget distros if anyone knows of names) I go in cycles though and I'll eventually put the pentargets back on the shelf until my next refresher review. I think Bacula Round 3 will be my next puzzle in a few weeks. If I get it going, I'll post my notes. Hopefully it's like Apache or the email triad and all becomes crystal clear after being setup correctly once.