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Review: Toshiba 320GB USB 2.0 Portable External Hard Drive

With hard drive sizes going up and costs going down, having individual backup storage is now a cost-effective solution to keep end users data safe. Jack Wallen reviews the Toshiba 320GB Portable External Hard Drive.

On the go business and enterprise computing isn't complete without a simple backup solution. With hard drive sizes going up and costs going down, having individual backup storage is now a cost-effective solution to keep end users data safe. Toshiba makes a line of easy to use external drives that include a simple-to-use backup solution that will ensure all of your data is backed up safely and quickly.

Specifications

  • Size: 320GB
  • Interface: USB 2.0
  • Speed: 480Mb/s
  • System Requirements: Windows 2000/XP/Vista and Mac OS X 10.3.9 (required to use included software)
  • Dimensions/Weight: 3.2x5.0x3.2, 7oz
  • Warranty: Limited three years
  • Price: $120
  • Additional information

Who's it for?

The Toshiba 320 Portable drive is targeted at home users but the device is a perfect solution for any on the go business user concerned with data loss. The included software makes automating backup procedures simple and hassle free.

What problem does it solve?

The Toshiba 320 solves two problems: Automated backup and on-the-fly backup. The included software allows the user to configure precisely the files/directories you want to backup as well as the frequency of the backup.

Standout features

  • Lightning fast move/copy/backup of files
  • Recognized by most operating systems (including Linux)
  • Silent operation
  • User friendly backup software

What's wrong?

Considering the purpose of this device, the only downside is its non-infinite capacity. Outside of that, it would be nice if the backup software would allow for a one-time backup along with the scheduled backup options.

Competitive products

Bottom line for business

If you are looking for one of the easiest backup solutions for mobile users, the Toshiba 320 is one to consider. With one of the easiest solutions for automated backups, smallest size (for its capacity), and sleek design, your users will find backing up data is no longer a chore. Data will be preserved and work will go on.

User rating

Have you deployed Toshiba's 350GB Portable External Hard Drive? If so, how would you rate your experience? Rate this product below and compare your results to what other TechRepublic members think. Give your own personal review of the Toshiba 320GB USB 2.0 Portable External Hard Drive in the TechRepublic Community Forum or let us know if you think we left anything out in our review.

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About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

11 comments
wooly1
wooly1

Sounds more like a house brick than a portable drive (3.2 x 5.0 x 3.2 inches). My WD 320Gb is tiny by comparison at 5.0 x 3.0 x 0.25 inches.

musa.hamid
musa.hamid

well i have the 250gb one and it doesnt have any backup software. or is it only bundled with the 320gb drive ?

richard.stroud
richard.stroud

I just bought 2 1TB USB SATA II external Hard drives which you can use for backup, remove and install in a system if you want or just hook them up to your Dish receiver or DVR to expand recordable space, each for under $90. I gave this product a 2 rating for being way too small in capacity for the cost.

MJMateyka
MJMateyka

I had problems with my Toshiba 160GB portable. My old Dell running XP would not recognize the thing. Since all the guide says is plug it in the USB port and go, I sent a message to tech support. I got back a reply there was nothing they could do since there are no drivers. I will never by Toshiba anything again.

?vatar
?vatar

Well. In 2003 I purchased an early WD 80GB USB drive that worked well. In 2004, got another WD, this time 320GB. In 2006, another WD 750GB and in 2008 a complimentary IOMEGA 750GB. I keep the two 750GB as prime archiving devices and sync them with SyncToy2 (should one fail, bingo! got another). I don't think I could live without backup drives anymore. Oh yeah, the two 750GB also serve as where disc images of my computers go. That old 80GB USB drive still works like a charm, it's a shame it's a bit slow compared to the others. Still good for backup images though.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

I purchased a 120GB external hard drive about 2 years ago. At the time, that was a huge drive in this portable form, but now it pales in comparison. What size is your external hard drive?

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

You are saying 320GB is not enough capacity. Just think about how much data that really is. It is amazing how much storage capacity we can hold in the palm of our hand these days.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

I have had few problems. However, if it did work in other systems, it may have been found but the drive letter was already reserved for something else. just go into drive manager and change the letter and it will likely work.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

is my most current addition. Picked it up at Fry's this last weekend for $139. 5 yr. warranty according to the box. My next size down is a 250GB USB drive, then a 120GB drive. So far this seagate is QUIET! I havent heard a peep from it and it has been loading data for a few days now. So far, I recommend it

sidekick
sidekick

Well, I'm not one to go around bragging about the size of my external hard drive, but I can assure you that I have not received any complaints that it was too small ;) I have a 160 GB Maxtor One Touch 4 Mini that I have used for the last year or so, mostly to back up virtual machines and other data at school using SyncToy before installing Portable Apps on the drive and using Toucan. I'm planning on getting a 1 TB USB/E-Sata external drive that can be had for $100 now to backup my home computers.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

he said for the price it was low capacity, and I agree. When looking around over the weekend, 320GB drives were pretty cheap, and most USB drives were 500GB, 1 Terabyte, or 1.5 Terabyte. 500GB USB drives were under $100 (USB). And for just $20 more than what you paid, I picked up a Seagate 1.5 terabyte drive, which will hold close to 5x what your drive will. I do see the use for smaller drives, I even sub in the 60GB drives on occasion (or less). However, with my flash drives up at 16GB (I know, they get much bigger), the flash drives use the small stuff and the HDD's go for the big stuff.

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