Smartphones

Infographic: Smartphone shoppers don't close the deal

This Statista infographic by Monetate shows that smartphone users do more window shopping than making actual purchases.

A recent infographic on Statista shows the conversion rates of online shoppers across different devices, including PCs, tablets (iPad and Android), and smartphones (iPhone, Android, and Windows). According to the research results of Monetate, a provider of e-commerce solutions, smartphone users do more window shopping than making actual purchases. Here's a snippet from the infographic:

Interestingly, smartphones account for more traffic than tablets do, but the conversion rate on tablets is three times higher than it is on smartphones. The data suggests that tablet users actually make purchases on their device while smartphone users browse products and check prices on the go but turn to bigger devices or actual brick-and-mortar stores to make the purchase.

Do you think these statistics are indicative of smartphone security concerns, or is it merely an issue of screen size? It will be interesting to see how these stats trend over the next few years, as smartphone technology evolves and there's an increase in NFC-enabled mobile devices. Share your thoughts about smartphone shopping in the discussion thread below.

Also read

About

Sonja Thompson has worked for TechRepublic since October of 1999. She is currently a Senior Editor and the host of the Smartphones and Tablets blogs.

7 comments
coffeeshop
coffeeshop

While mobile phone security is full of weak spots, most consumers either don't know or don't care about the risks of sending personal or financial data over a public network and/or using a mobile platform. Online banking from a smartphone, anyone? Granted, EVERYTHING, even home computing, has its security flaws. But for me personally, the reason I don't shop using my smartphone mostly comes down to a combination of screen size and lack of compatibility between some websites and devices. WhenI look up a product using my phone, it will almost always be either to compare prices or to find a local retailer. Considering security risks makes me even more hesitant to 'seal the deal' using my phone, but mostly it's convenience which takes priority.

JCAlford
JCAlford

Something no one has mentioned is that when out shopping, 99% of folks have their cell on them, not a tablet or PC. So, if a person wants to compare prices, they aren't going to go home and look it up or whip out a tablet, they are going to use their cell. While I have made purchases on my cell, most of the time when I use it to "shop", I'm just comparing prices or checking availability. As MagicMoment pointed out, most sites don't work well on small phone screens. There have been many times when I'm out that I will whip out my cell to make sure a certain store has an item in stock before I drive over there. Cell phones do drive business, just in a "soft" way not a "hard" way that is easy to track.

bjswm
bjswm

For me it is definitely security concerns. I will not use my phone for any sort of financial transaction.

MagicMoment
MagicMoment

It is definitely screen size/keyboard size. Filling out those forms with the small screen is a pain. In addition, sometimes some of the forms don't function properly with all the various security pieces to get the charges to go through. Then you don't know if you should checkout again or not.

john.vinton
john.vinton

Definitely bigger screen. I can browse somewhat on my Samsung Galaxy II, but when it comes to filling out forms etc. the screen and keypad are just too small.

brainphat
brainphat

Mobile phones have a credibility gap you can fly a Chinook through. The OS's are all buggy, most carriers financially hamstring you into one flavor of an OS so most of the open source promise of Android is a pipe dream, and most of the "security" involved can be classified as: father knows best, security through obscurity, or the device has an off-putting hackability-to-user-base ratio. Add to that wifi security concerns, bad faith on the manufacturers and carriers part, bad actors in the app market (mal- and spyware apps) and who knows what else (literally: who?), and you enter the realm into which people do not whip out their credit/debt card. I wish Square all the best, but every time I use it I sweat over my statements for months afterwards. The OS & phone manufacturers need to invite the hackiest hackers to find out how to do secure transactions, and then get the smartest marketers to explain how it works to people.

mckinnej
mckinnej

the fact that many websites just don't work that well on mobile browsers or their dedicated apps just plain suck. Although they're comparing phone shoppers to tablet shoppers, I tend to lump those all together as mobile shoppers. I'm one of those. I'll browse on my tablet, (don't own a smartphone and will not as long as data plans exist), but when I actually want to buy something, I go to my PC or laptop where I can see what is going on and the website generally works the way one would expect. I feel the security is better on the "fixed" devices too. (Don't have data to back that up; it's just a gut feeling.)

Editor's Picks