Smartphones

Infographic: Your dirty habits making you sick

This infographic by Ion Swipes takes a look at some disturbing stats concerning germs at home and the workplace.

Ion Swipes recently published an infographic that provided some disturbing statistics concerning germs at your home and workplace. One of the grossest stats is that 16% of cell phones have fecal matter on them. My guess is that these folks are leisurely or multitasking poopers, who either turn to Angry Birds or answer text messages during their toilet time.

Do you use technology in the bathroom? If so, I highly suggest that you stock up on some ionSwipes anti-microbial wipes and keep them right next to your anti-bacterial hand soap. For goodness sake, keep your hands and your technology clean!

About

Sonja Thompson has worked for TechRepublic since October of 1999. She is currently a Senior Editor and the host of the Smartphones and Tablets blogs.

17 comments
sujitha1
sujitha1

Warning that the combination of a cellphone's close proximity to your ears, nose and mouth with its bacteria-loving warmth, could expose people to germs that are harmful to their health.

Snak
Snak

If 'germs', and 'bacteria' were as dangerous as Cleaning Agent Sellers would have us believe, we wouldn't have made it this far. If we are only now destroying 99.9% of the bacteria we come across in our day-to-day lives, how come our ancestors lived long enough to breed us? I'm reminded of an advert for a kitchen cleaner whose advertising blurb simply proved it wasn't necessary - 'you've had these germs for years - now you can get rid of them....'

andrew232006
andrew232006

Why should we care? Shouldn't we be more worried about whether it is a type of bacteria that can make us sick than the count? If you find that 50% of tv remotes contain the flu virus or Salmonellosis, let me know and I'll start worrying.

academica
academica

I am wondering why people let media, companies and individuals wash their brain in such a simple way. Bacteria are everywhere and most probably they have mostly a beneficial function to train the immune system. I don't see any reason to get paranoid about the existence of bacteria around us. The only benefit from this infographic is for ionSwipes, who will wash your brain to buy their product, which in time may turn out to be more dangerous than all existing bacteria.

LedLincoln
LedLincoln

About the unhealthiest environment a person can possibly live in is a germ-free bubble. Our bodies need exposure to common microbes in order to develop strong immune systems. Lay off the disinfectants, already! Not only do they encourage the proliferation of "superbugs", cutting-edge research is suggesting that an overly-clean environment may be responsible for the huge surge in allergies and asthma.

Peagravel
Peagravel

I'd like to see a complete definition of “fecal matter”, sounds like it's poop, but what else falls in the category?

ppg
ppg

This article is a poorly disguised ad for ionSwipes. However excessive use of antimicrobial wipes will lead to antibiotic resistant microbes. According to their own statistics the wipes only kill 99.9% of bacteria. That means 0.1% survive - again there are about 25 bacteria that survive each time you wipe your phone. Not only do they survive they are very angry. Repeat this a few times and you have a new strain of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Just wash your food and wash your hands with soap and water. Although then ionSwipes won't make much money.

steven.taylor
steven.taylor

Is techrepublic endorsing a commericial product?

alan918273
alan918273

So I printed out and retreated to the cleanest zone - my toilet seat.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

the white on orange is almost impossible to read, then when you add in the small fonts it's a forget it I can't read it at all until I go get my magnifying glass and put it in front of the screen. I've a 23 inch widescreen with decent resolution, but that's damn hard to read.

bboyd
bboyd

Other than soaking your entire earthly being in bleach for hours you will swab for Fecal Coliform. FC is used as an indicator of contamination levels not just a Yes/No its dirty assumption. Humans are gross assemblages with more micro-organisms than we have cells. What is important is to not have FC levels be high in food or water supplies. Yes please do wipe down your devices and handles and other things you contact. Why? Because we are disgusting oozing masses. Spinach anyone? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fecal_coliform

Sonja Thompson
Sonja Thompson

I actually thought the stats were pretty interesting. I personally keep a bottle of hand sanitizer in my car, at the office, and in my home - you know, for those moments when you don't have time or the ability to thoroughly wash your hands.

Sonja Thompson
Sonja Thompson

It opens to the Ion Swipes web site, and the text is much bigger. ;)

ppg
ppg

My point and I think the point of many other commentators is that we feel using antibiotic wipes or hand sanitizers is not a good idea. It would be fine if you were the only person in the world doing this but when you multiply by the millions of other people in the world also doing it you rapidly build up antibiotic resistant bacteria. Antibiotics have been in use less than 100 years and already there are an array of resistant bacteria. Clearly we need to modify our approach if we expect to have effecive antibiotics in the long term and I don't think using them to casually kill most bacteria, which are probably harmless, from our hands is an appropriate use for antibiotics. Just as a personal aside - my hands don't even feel clean if I use hand sanitizer.