Mobility

Leading smartphone feature-to-feature comparison chart

Jack Wallen breaks down the feature offerings of four of the leading business smartphones in the United States.

In the information-saturated times we live in, I think most of us try to take shortcuts any way we can. It's why some people flock to YouTube videos to watch a how-to tip before they'll slog through hundreds of words of prose meant to guide them along a technique.

Charts are sometimes a godsend for those just-give-me-the-info-as-quickly-as-you-can people. For their sakes, we've created a chart that compares the features of four of the leading smartphones in the U.S. market now.

So, if you just want a quick answer on which smartphones have removable storage or which ones offer the best battery life, take a look at the chart below (you can click on the chart to enlarge the image).

[Update 4/10/2013: Thanks to feedback in the discussion thread, we've made some changes to the graphic. Some of these changes include the addition and subtraction of features, focusing primarily on the features that are more geared towards business users.]

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

17 comments
pjboyles
pjboyles

Where is the MicroSD card listing. Everyone EXCEPT iPhone has one. It is a major point against the iPhone. Neither the SII nor iPhone have NFC. SII on Sprint has WiMax. Internal flash, RAM and storage numbers are missing. They make a difference. Needs Windows Phone 8 and Blackberry for completeness. Samsung has deploy 4.1.2 on Sprint (manual update) and most of the other carriers.

brupub
brupub

can't believe the 920 isn't in your chart

laman
laman

Yes, too many errors. I am sure too that iPhone 5 does not have NFC, microUSB, and TV-Out needs separate cable which is not mentioned. I am also sure that Samsung Galaxy SIII has maps, predictive text input PLUS Swype, image viewer/editor, audio/video player/editor, Twitter and Facebook integration, dedicated mic, voice memo/dial command. Is the author get paid to midlead people? This articule is so unprofessional, author should be penalised to releasing it.

Sensor Guy
Sensor Guy

No Blackberry (QNX), Symbian or Windows? No discussion on applications and security in a business device? That's a pretty good chunk of the market and feature groups that's been ignored. No discussion on applications market, development frameworks? OS differences per carrier control? Too much emphasis on Android sub-releases (that's a clear turnoff for a CIO and/or CTO like me because by the time I have made a decision, vendor selected, carrier selected and unit payload loaded and a rollout of a couple of hundred started Android has already morphed a few times). In addition, there's some clear bias here against iPhone and some Android offerings. No WiFi? iPhone has deployed NFC? No display technology for iOS? No GPU technology alternative for Motorola? Isn't Gorrila(TM) glass a brand name for a vendor product or a technology? Errors on processor complex offerings (quad, dual, etc.)? Why a separate entry for GPRS? If the emphasis is business and the US (which I think is problematic) why not talk about industry penetration? Business versus personal ownership? Multiple device management? How about desktop and tablet integration options? The performance of a common application seen in business? I bet you can't even answer these questions because this isn't a business chart. It's only a limited, albeit sometimes incorrect limited, if not random to prove one device better than all others, list of technical specs, they not even features. Why not start with a list as to what technical specification even have any value or should be in a "business smartphone"? Very poor list to include the word "business" and be useful.

sasso.marc
sasso.marc

The chart is virtually useless, why bother posting inaccurate and incomplete information?

carpetking
carpetking

But as one who started out with an iPhone and then went to the Android OS and lastly using the WIndows Phone, I've got to tell you I lie the WIndows phone platform the best. Wish you had included them in the comparison. Yes, there are larger 'App stores' for the iPhone and Android OS's, but how many different flavors of Scientific calculators do you need. On my WIndows phone I've got Facebook, Ebay, Battle ship, Starbucks and of course a scientific calculator, so I am good to go! Maybe consider this worthy OS next time around.

Ken Ga
Ken Ga

Jack, Great job on the chart. Just a few changes to the chart though. My Galaxy SIII OS was upgraded to 4.1.2 last month and now shares the same OS as the Note II. A co-worker has an SIII with a differant carrier and he is still on the previous Jellybean OS. In short, the OS may differ, depending on the carrier. Also, the Galaxy SIII has a dual-core processor and not a quad-core, as noted on the chart.

TNT
TNT

I don't own one, so I could be mistaken, but I'm pretty sure the iPhone has WiFi capability and does not have NFC.

TNT
TNT

I do not own one, so I could be mistaken, but I believe the iPhone has WiFi options and does not have NFC.

jrevier
jrevier

I have a Note II. it is about the best thing there is in my experience. The display is crisp and clear. response on 3g is very good. I am waiting on LTE in the Sprint Network to try that. the Wireless is superb. Talk Time frankly I can't talk that much. The battery life numbers always seem be a bit of a lie (they always state best case) and in life there is never a best case. So I tried my own test and went to Netflix using my home wireless and watched 3 consecutive movies. (have done this test twice for validation). The 3 movies ~ 5 hours of watching time and the battery life in both tests averaged ~ 28% drain. I think that is remarkable for the phone having the display on constantly. the Note II gets my thumbs up. It is top drawer in my book.

fof9l
fof9l

In any survey purporting to cover "leading business smartphones", Blackberry has to have at least one entry. Despite the trendy twittering, Blackberry phones are still the phone of choice for anyone who needs a serious tool, and not just a piece of social media junk. Your failure to include the Z10 places your survey in the "irrelevant" category.

Caladan607
Caladan607

I just got the LG Spectrum 2 and I find it matches the Galaxy note 2 in almost all ways except for a document reader (which I can download an open version like Libre for this functionality). So far, I am very happy with it. I like the voice input/output and bright, large screen both of which are very handy when using GPS directions while driving. I have 40-50% battery at 11pm so it lasted the day. Very clear voice/audio on calls and music. The video capability is ok but something I would very rarely use (and it eats battery capacity at a high rate). Overall a good phone that compares well with the ones in the table above.

mrfreeze574
mrfreeze574

I was hoping to see the BlackBerry Z10 on the list, since this is discussing "Business Smartphones".

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The first thing I noticed on the chart was the OSs - 1 Apple and 3 Android. Doesn't anyone make a Windows 'business' phone?

Sensor Guy
Sensor Guy

I just searched on those specs and the iPhone on the internet. Thirty second invalidation process of this chart.

mark.cooper
mark.cooper

I'm in charge of smartphones for an SMB. BlackBerry has not been an option for the last year. My choice is Windows Phone. We use Exchange for email and Office 2010. Windows Phone 7.5/8 works great in our environment. I'm not able to see Jack's chart for some reason. But, as far as I'm concerned, the BlackBerry Z10 is "irrelevant."

mpgme
mpgme

YOUR IN CHARGE That said it all for me. why were the yanks last to get the Z10? They are "irrelevant." is my guess..

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