Mobile OS

Calling all developers: Palm wants your apps for its beta App store

Palm is now accepting apps for consideration in its App Catalog e-commerce beta program, which is being launched to test the experience for webOS app developers and users. The program will open to all developers later this year.

This is a guest post from Sam Diaz of TechRepublic's sister site ZDNet. You can follow Sam on his ZDNet blog Between the Lines, or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Palm said today that it is now accepting apps for consideration in its App Catalog e-commerce beta program, which is being launched to test the experience for webOS app developers and users. The program will open to all developers later this year.

Last month, the company opened its Mojo Software Development Kit for developers - a move to beef up its relationship with app developers and start chasing other players in the mobile space, notably Apple and its home-run App store.

In its blog post announcing the beta, Palm offers details of the program:

  • Developers can submit both free and paid applications for evaluation.
  • You can charge a one-time fee for the download of your application.
  • Initially, the user base for e-commerce will be limited to the United States.
  • Developers will receive 70 percent of revenues generated through application sales (less applicable sales taxes).
  • webOS users will pay for their application purchases using credit cards and will download apps directly to their webOS device.

I also liked that Palm gave some clues on what it takes for an app to be accepted into the beta program, including:

  • Apps should be useful and engaging to users.
  • They need to have an appealing design and user interface aligned with Palm UI guidelines.
  • They are written specifically for webOS and not delivered through the browser.
  • They leverage webOS platform and device capabilities, for example, notifications, multitasking/background processing, location services, accelerometer.
  • They have acceptable performance and response time on the device; apps with slow UI response or sluggish performance will be rejected. Applications that consume excessive power on the device will also be rejected.

Too bad I just ended my relationship with the Palm Pre. It would have been cool to see what Palm app developers come up with.

6 comments
Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

So Palm (in their finite wisdom) is willing to let us pay them so we can develop apps so they can charge others to download the apps? Does that quality as a Ponzi scheme or a Pyramid scheme? Are they hooking up with Amway too?

Justin James
Justin James

Sad to say, that's how the iPhone works too. You can't even *test* your app on an actual iPhone without paying to become a developer! Unless you use a "jailbroken" iPhone to test. This is one major reason why I am baffled that Windows Mobile is not more popular... you do not need to pay a cent to anyone to write or distribute apps for it. J.Ja

csmith.kaze
csmith.kaze

I know the App store is by far Apple's "killer app" (so to speak) but having to jail break my phone to get apps Apple has decreed "bad" isn't exactly cool. On the other hand, the chick from the commercials scares the hell out of me. :)

Justin James
Justin James

Palm's quickly approaching "has been" status. The Pre's sales are already disappointing, despite overall favorable reviews. As a developer, I'd have to wonder what kind of rat flocks to a sinking ship? J.Ja

Universal Soldier
Universal Soldier

I have a Palm Pre and I love it...let me guess, you have an I-phone??? Rats to a sinking ship? Hmmm...nice analogy. :)

Justin James
Justin James

Actually, I don't have an iPhone... I don't think it's a particularly compelling choice, and AT&T is a lousy carrier. Frankly, I don't have any "skin in the game", I have a very basic model phone. :) I've heard a lot of really good things about the Palm Pre, don't get me wrong. My statement is based on Palm's numbers. The Pre's sales are not meeting expectations, and they are already looking at scaling back the production on them. In other words, the Pre was supposed to be Palm's first shot across the bow in their battle to comeback, but it looks like it might be their death rattle. It's unfortunate, because everything I've seen/read about the Pre makes me like it a lot more than the iPhone. Frankly, if I were to own a smartphone (I work from home, so I really don't need portable computing so much), I'd want to own a Windows Mobile device, *only* because I'd be able to program it to work the way I think a phone should work. J.Ja

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