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Do you plan to use cloud computing in your programming work?

Justin James thinks that more programmers will use cloud computing as their comfort level with it grows. Take this quick poll to let us know whether you plan to use (or are already using) cloud computing.

The world of cloud computing has received a lot of attention recently, in no small part due to Microsoft's announcement of the Windows Azure platform. A few weeks ago, many readers of this blog expressed doubts around cloud computing, while other readers think it's a great idea.

My personal belief is that cloud computing has a possible role to play, and that most of the reasons why it is not widely adopted are business reasons and not technical ones. As the comfort level increases, I expect to see more programmers use cloud computing; others out there disagree. I'm curious to see if there are any "silent majorities" amongst the readers.

Take this quick poll to let me know whether you plan to use (or are already using) cloud computing.

J.Ja

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

7 comments
emaname
emaname

We plan to use it for a while, but will be switching to our own solution at some point. There certainly are advantages to a start-up (like ourselves) to address certain equipment needs, but we aren't comfortable with someone else having ultimate control over access to our data.

Justin James
Justin James

I agree that clouds are more attractive to startups, who may often lack the money to invest in infrastructure, and usually do not have the time or manpower to dedicate to setting up servers, securing them, etc. Indeed, in the startup environment of "many hats", I would imaging that even the worst cloud provider will probably be able to provide more stability and security than a startup. I do also agree with the idea that once the startup gets some traction, many of them would want to shift to in-house systems, at least for the critical stuff. It stops making sense to use an online version of QuickBooks, for example, when you're turning $15 million in sales... J.Ja

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

Nor will I buy or use cloud software ever. Why would anyone want to go back to the days of the mainframe with some bonehead in a white coat dragging users around by their short hair? I lived through those days and I will make my own software before returning.

Justin James
Justin James

I agree, cloud computing has a lot of similarities to the mainframe environments. The mainframe concept does make sense, under certain conditions, though. I'm not 100% against them, but a lot of that stems from the environment I learned about IT in, too. J.Ja

Justin James
Justin James

The application that my employer makes cannot use cloud computing, for legal reasons (it deals with sensitive data), business reasons (our customers are very conservative and would not feel comfortable with it) and technical reasons (it is not well suited for cloud computing). At the same time, though, I do see many applications which are a good fit for CC. What about you? J.Ja

Jaqui
Jaqui

if it is a cloud system the clients control, a cloud computing implementation actually gives better security, the data is only stored in one place, which can be locked down tight except for the application. It almost sounds like you make banking software, which is an industry that could gain from the use of cloud computing easily. it hasn't really broken from the mainframe and batch processing yet.

Justin James
Justin James

The applications that my company writes and sells are to help legal professionals create documents. As such, they need to tightly integrate with Word, and the IT departments of legal companies are extremely conservative, for obvious reasons. Better to be old fashioned than to take a risk on the "latest and greatest". So I can see why you'd think that we were in banking, similar environment with a lot of cross-pollenation of personell and IT philosophies. J.Ja

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