Microsoft

How do you expect Windows 7 to affect the apps you write?

Developers, does the release of Windows 7 Release Candidate allow you to do new things, does it create problems for your programs, or does it not affect you at all? Take this poll to let us know.

Windows 7 was recently released as a Release Candidate; less well known but just as important is that Windows Server 2008 R2 was released as a Release Candidate on the same day. (Windows Server 2008 R2 should really be called Windows Server 7 because that is what it is.)

For a few developers, a new Windows OS allows them to do things that they previously could not do. But for some developers, a new Windows OS potentially wrecks the programs they are working on, while other developers feel less of an impact. Of course, programmers working on non-Windows applications and many Web applications are completely unaffected by these new releases. I'm curious to know how your work is affected (if at all).

 

J.Ja

Disclosure of Justin's industry affiliations: Justin James has a working arrangement with Microsoft to write an article for MSDN Magazine. He also has a contract with Spiceworks to write product buying guides.

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About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

17 comments
programit
programit

As with all Microsofts releases things that work fine will break for no real reason. I've already noticed speed decrease, instability and breakages simply going from Windows 7 Beta to RC Most new devs now are aimed primarily at non os specific to bypass the endless compatibility problems.

Justin James
Justin James

For me, I don't see Windows 7 being significantly different from Vista, in terms of breaking the apps I work with, but I suspect it may enable some new things, particularly as people upgrade from XP to W7. J.Ja

jslarochelle
jslarochelle

...where we had to debug some of the C++ DLL that we are using to fix some compatibility issues. This time around I expect that the C++ stuff should be ok. For the rest of it since all of our user interface code is Java Swing interface things should be ok once we get a JDK that does work under Windows 7. I have not even checked that yet so I guess it shows that we are not waiting for this new version with any amount of expectation. Feature wise we would be ok running on Windows XP if it could be made more secure. JS

reisen55
reisen55

I once posted a note that most users do not care about the "operating system" per se. Most people, at home and in corporate, use a computer for standard stuff such as writing, spreadsheet, presentations and email. Wow, big list. And the os does not really impact much of that list. It is there of course, but give somebody Microsoft Word, Powerpoint or Mozilla and most are happy. So - why Windows 7?

Slayer_
Slayer_

It would be nice if W7 includes an API that quickly grabs you the path to the application data folder for the current user. This would encourage multi user and limited user programs. ATM, I refuse to use the user registry to save settings, I usually use either the install folder, or their my documents folder. With simple if access denied then use my documents.

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

We get some with every release, though I expect this will be far from the problems we experienced with Vista. Nothing yet, though.

Justin James
Justin James

... but they do tend to use whatever OS comes on the PC, and W7 will be coming on PCs soon, and unlike Vista and XP, quickly displacing its precessor (neither Vista nor XP impressed the buying public when they launched, most customers stuck with the older OS's for a while), and quite possibly XP as well. On top of that, many shops have explicitly stated that they are skipping Vista and going straight to W7. So yeah, while W7 may not impress people up front (personally, it seems to lack much of the "wow" that Vista had, if you consider Vista to have had any "wow"), it will be on a substantial number of PCs very, very quickly. It is certainly much more eagerly anticipated than Vista was. J.Ja

Justin James
Justin James

... but .Net has had that functionality for as long as I can recall. Since I went from Perl to Java to .Net, I can say that I have never stored data in the registry nor have I ever put them (other than default settings which get copied to the user's directory the first time its run) in the program's directory. As a result, my application's data always get properly backed up, are easily located for restoral, and have all of the other benefits of being in "the right place." :) J.Ja

Justin James
Justin James

If anything, Windows 7 seems to be a bit more relaxed about the things that Vista was strict on which caused breakage. I will say, well behaved .Net apps suffered very, very little breakage with Vista, it seemed. J.Ja

Justin James
Justin James

I actually thought that Vista was quite appealing at a visual level. I remember when I first installed it, my girlfriend (at the time, now my wife) was staring at it saying, "I don't see the big deal". Then she saw me picking screensavers, and she said "I want Vista too." Granted, she's not a huge sample set, but it really hit me at that moment that yeah, Vista did pack some visual "wow" for some people. I thought it was sharp, much better looking than XP. And indeed, my experiences with Vista have been much better than XP across the board. But that's just me, and I'm not a huge sample set either. :) J.Ja

Saurondor
Saurondor

Vista had plenty of "wow". Just not the intended "wow"

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

My clients are generally software resellers, so their clients are the ones who require the support. They buy new PCs with the latest OS, and they expect my clients' software to work on it.

Slayer_
Slayer_

This could prove useful, thanks.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I never use .net, I prefer languages that don't require huge overhead. But this is for my own projects, at work, we are simply SOL, as although we make the guts of the program, the shell is made by another company, we can't even get our stuff to work in Vista yet, let alone Windows 7.

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

The .NET Framework did give you a few shots over the bow even on XP. If you paid attention to those, they didn't become cannonballs in your poop deck come Vista.

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