Windows 8

Poll: How easy will it be to make money on Windows 8 apps?

Take the poll to let us know whether you predict Windows 8 app development will be an easy way to earn money.

One surprising thing in the world of mobile development is that it is often easier to make money in an app market like Windows Phone 7 or BlackBerry than it is in the larger ones (Android and iOS) because there isn't as much competition in those areas. At the same time, there is something to be said for having a massive user base available, especially for an app with a broad appeal.

With Windows 8 right around the corner, it will be interesting to see if the Windows 8 store is a place where developers can earn a healthy profit. My belief is that even if a small percentage of Windows users move to it, that's still a huge number overall, and it will be a good way to make money.

J.Ja

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About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

13 comments
Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

different command sets for their systems. If what you write is to work only in a browser, any browser, and within the limitations of the browser standards; yes you can do a one apps suits all. But the moment you want it to interact direct with the operating system, then you start to have difficulties affect the design. PS I don't know where the vote came from as I rarely vote and just noticed someone had voted on this. Also, it matters NOT what you design, Microsoft are working hard to ensure you HAVE to sell it through their store so they can make some money off your work. And that's AFTER they've charged you for access to the code needed to make it work with their system.

sarai1313
sarai1313

devloper only needs to wright one verson to work on all devices.not differnt for one each device like you have to do know now one set of code to wirght and time saved getting it out to phone,pad,pad,laptop ,and desk top. i see a lot of money being made. iam sorry have you guys read any of microsofts news letters i have .try reading a few and then get back to me

Skruis
Skruis

Typically come when the app is designed for the OS you're using so I guess you can try to write a web app to function on multiple devices but it's probably just easier to create a single backend and multiple front ends each for the particular devices rather than try to bake all of that flexibility into a single app. They're not working hard, they've done it. To release a Windows 8 app, not a desktop application, you have to sell it through the Store but again, there are advantages to using a Store and if you have to use a Store, why not use the one with the most visibility? Again, no one sells your app for free while handling all of the transactions, subscriptions and delivery.

Skruis
Skruis

Windows Phone 8 while using the same core has some different GUI portions that you have to address but in a sense, yep, there's at least some time savings involved in that ability to share code which I guess will translate into making it easier to make money via the Store. It was the least Microsoft could do (to make it easier to share code) seeing as how unlike the iPad and iPhone, you can't use the exact same app on Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8. Because all you have to do is alter the GUI portion, it can be assumed the most developers will choose to port their apps.

spawnywhippet
spawnywhippet

I hope your coding is of a higher standard than your English spelling

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

where it quotes the Microsoft policy: The Windows Store will be the only means of distributing Metro-style applications to users; the official reason is to allow Microsoft to scan apps for security flaws and malware.[4] The Windows Store will take a 30% cut of application sales. Once an application reaches $25,000 USD in revenue, the cut drops to 20%. Third-party transactions are also allowed, of which Microsoft does not take a cut.[citation needed] Individual developers will be able to register for $49 USD, and $99 USD for companies http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Store In short, the Windows Store IS THE ONLY way to sell a Win 8 app. To use it you have to fork out an up front fee to register to sell through it, and THEN Microsoft take 30% of the sale. It would seem there is NO other store for selling apps to people with Win 8. Not sure how tight they'll push this or how they'll decide what is an app and what isn't.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'm confused. Aren't 'apps' applications? Are you saying the definition is based on the 'store' model of delivery system?

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

as Photoshop, Firefox, or Libre Office that's made by a third party for use on a desktop only when they get around to making one that will work well on the Metro UI? We already know they won't be able to be run on the ARM devices as they'll require too much in the way of resources, and it's most likely, especially for Firefox and Libre Office, that they'll be made available through their own website and not the Microsoft Store. Do they cease being an app because they aren't sold through the store?

Justin James
Justin James

"But it seems they may now use the word in a different way, but I've seen no clear definition of what they now mean by an app." This is VERY simple. If it runs under the Metro UI, it is an "app" that must be delivered through the store. If it runs under the "legacy desktop", it is NOT an "app" and can be delivered in any of the traditional ways, and they are also allowing at least some "legacy desktop" applications (like Office) to be delivered through the store. J.Ja

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

an operating system on which you installed applications, known as apps - for short, some of these apps were things like Excel, Word, Paint, Photoshop, MYOB, screensavers, etc. But it seems they may now use the word in a different way, but I've seen no clear definition of what they now mean by an app. Now as to facilitating the transaction delivery, the usual way is to charge a fee to use the service OR to take a cut for providing the service - only rip off merchants charge people BOTH ways, but the Microsoft Shop charges you to be able to sell through them and then takes a 30% cut as well. AND that's after they charge you to get the code needed to develop the app for Win 8.

Skruis
Skruis

And that's any app that uses the new framework. Microsoft will not charg you to install Steam on your x86 computer or to publish it on the web and have someone download it outside of the store. They will not charge you to install Photoshop on your x86 computer or to publish it on the web and have someone download it outside of the store. The only thing they charge a developer for is posting it in the Microsoft's own store and if the developer decides to charge for it, yes, there is revenue sharing because...again...Microsoft is facilitating the delivery and transaction. This is a very simple and very clear issue.

sarai1313
sarai1313

no realy thanks. you too tired of this app(Application ) crap also.when did everything turn to slang.no wonder folks cant Follow along.well at least they dont have to read Color codes to replace a resistor.hell i dout any of them know you used to be able to hold a Transistor in your and not need a electron microscope to see one in a cpu

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