Apps

Poll: What kind of version control do you use?

Even though it is standard for development shops to use a formal version control system, distributed version control systems have rapidly gained adoption. If you are using version control, what kind are you using?

In the past, version control was complex enough that many developers went without it or used a self-made system (e.g., some developers created directory structures). In the last decade, it has become standard for development shops to use a formal version control system due to lowered complexity and costs. And yet, we have seen the development of distributed version control systems such as Git and Mercurial rapidly gain adoption. I've been using TFS, and even though I haven't had any issues with it, I am going to look at DVS and see if it makes sense for some of my projects.

If you are using version control, what kind are you using? Take the poll to let us know your answer.

J.Ja

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

15 comments
HeadScratcher7
HeadScratcher7

Just switched my personal projects over to it so I can get some experience working with it. I really like the fact that folders are stored as first class objects so I can finally stop freaking out if I want to merge code from someone else. Very different from the old centralized repository layout like Visual Sourcesafe although Bazaar will allow you to work with that type of workflow if you prefer. I've worked on big projects with VS and it was a nightmare to keep the "trunk" in a working state so that automated builds could run. We finally had to resort to using a text file on the server as a checkin queue and nobody was allowed to "just" checkin. Once you were at the top of the queue you did a full checkout, a full rebuild, and a test run. It slowed everything to a crawl. In any case, Bazaar can be found at http://bazaar.canonical.com/en/ I recommend installing it and then checking out the included help files (at the moment they are far better than the help on the website -it also a good primer on various workflows, centralized vs. distributed, etc.)

kunjbhai
kunjbhai

I use evolphin's zoom. Its prettty easy to use and has reallly smooth UI. Also searching files etc. is very trivial with it. Its like a new dimension to versioning because of its visual appeal making it more suited for a simple user like me rather than a computer savvy, as sorry to say, but other tools expect users to be.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

with all it's super duper nifty test features. Used all sorts in my time, the only option I never liked was none....

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

Some of my clients still use the traditional tools, like PVCS 5.3. For my own work, I use mercurial with repositories on BitBucket (thanks to Chad for turning me on to the service).

apotheon
apotheon

I use a little Subversion, but mostly use Mercurial these days. BitBucket rocks my socks. I'm glad you like it, Sterling.

Jaqui
Jaqui

is that they support the idiocy that a repository checkout is the same as a tarball. sorry, but a tarball doesn't contain ANY version control information, so is HALF THE SIZE. [ at least, half the size of a GIT checkout. ] until they can wrap their wee minds around the difference between a repo checkout and a tarball, b type solutions are useless. and projects using them are off the list of usable projects.

GuyHarel
GuyHarel

We just love it. Of course, we dont know any other...except the infamous SourceSafe.

MikeGall
MikeGall

But SVN and git. I use daytime windows land dev work (using Tortiose/Visual SVN), and git for my parttime linux-land development. Yep you can code in .Net/SQL Server/IIS by day and Perl/C/postgres/Apache by night :-)

adimauro
adimauro

TFS at work, Hg at home...

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

... you can easily generate a tarball from the archives, using 'hg archive'. For my projects on Chip's Tips, I provide a link to the tarball, and another link to the repo.

apotheon
apotheon

SourceSafe != safe source

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

... each stack informs the other. You probably have more creative approaches than most members of either camp.

apotheon
apotheon

As Sterling mentioned, Mercurial plays nicely with tarballs. Also of interest, perhaps, is the fact that BitBucket (Mercurial's equivalent to GitHub) offers easy and straightforward download of Zip, gzip tarball, and bzip2 tarball archives of the source, without having to use the version control system tools themselves if you don't want to. GitHub also offers ZIP and gzip tarball archives. I haven't looked into git's built-in archiving capabilities at all.

Jaqui
Jaqui

to bad most projects using the distributed repo systems use GIT and don't believe in tarballs. :( It appears that they think sources means you want to develop the product. They seem to forget, a stable release tarball is what is used to build the binaries for a distro. and there are people who prefer to use the from sources model for all the apps they use. Doesn't mean they want [ or have the skills ] to develop.

Editor's Picks