Windows 8

Poll: Will Windows 8 on ARM factor into your development plans?

Let us know whether you plan to have Windows 8 on ARM ready apps in time for the Windows 8 launch.

The new Windows 8 Consumer Preview has gone a long way to improving on the Developer Preview in terms of making something that consumers and end users can use on tablets and similar devices. While Windows 8 on ARM (WOA) is an alternative to the iPad and various Android devices, it is not known whether users will treat it as a serious option.

This creates a dilemma for developers, because the faster the WOA uptake, the greater the pressure to write native Metro/WinRT applications for Windows 8 (it won't run third-party desktop applications). Has Microsoft done enough with WOA to make it successful enough to take it into account when planning your development roadmap?

J.Ja

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Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

7 comments
realvarezm
realvarezm

Most of all the people involved in software developing knows hows MS works and how their policies in new prodcuts change like the wind. Why? if im doing ok with Android and IOS should go to MS with my apps. It will be like trying to sell them to RIM the market is not enough or it is shrinking. All and all i wish them good luck.

jhoward
jhoward

This is somewhat of a shock to me that I am being asked to consider what has arguably been one of the most bloated and resource hungry operating systems of the past decade on a fixed architecture low power system. I don't doubt there have been provisions for this by Microsoft but I am in such shock that I might have to consider this as a viable platform I don't know how to respond. With Android and iOS having the lions share already for the mobile platforms and embedded linux being so robust for other devices this will be a hard sell unless Microsoft releases something the consumers really want and changes that market. I think Microsoft is a bit late to the show for this to be a big hit but who knows - anything is possible with the right marketing campaign and a little luck...

Mike Page
Mike Page

I see ARM as a mobile hardware platform. Since I don't develop mobile applications I don't have plans to worry about ARM at this time. If that changes then I'll start planning for it.

Justin James
Justin James

Microsoft has spent a lot of time creating what they call "MinWin", a bare-minimum kernel and set of systems, and as a result, Windows 8 could quite possibly run nicely on an ARM system. I haven't seen it in person, so I can't say, but I can say that in a minimally-provisioned x64 VM, Windows 8 runs nicely. I am pretty impressed, actually, on that end. J.Ja

jhoward
jhoward

That is good to know that they have trimmed a lot of fat off the OS (I wonder at what cost) but like I said - where is the incentive to move to a different platform when Android, iOS and embedded Linux are already doing this with success? What do I gain as a consumer and/or developer by choosing Microsoft for this purpose? When I think ARM I think mobile phones, tablets and small form factor appliances like wireless routers. Am I missing something that really might do well with Windows on it? What is the incentive vs the other platforms? Is it a licensing thing, app store availability (Apple's restrictions suck here), hardware compatibility, performance... - you get where I am going. Why should this be considered?

jhoward
jhoward

I agree having the same app on a tablet and the desktop is potentially a great sell given the Active Directory angle. It still means a 3rd OS I have to look at for mobile/small form factor devices since the Android and Apple fan clubs won't be going anywhere soon but something to think about. So this would put Windows 8 in a similar situation as Blackberry where you can secure devices, encrypt traffic, manage apps centrally and all those things that make Blackberry a really good device - technically speaking - for the enterprise world. May be worth taking a look at for the enterprise market but I wonder if it will suffer from the same issues Blackberry has - the Apple and Android devices are just more versatile and fit into that casual out of work time better. Being in IT I have to carry this thing with me 24x7 - so it had better be able to keep me entertained in my time off as well. This is the main reason I moved from Blackberry a few years back. I still miss the Outlook integration with Blackberry but man it was night and day browsing on an Android phone and the apps felt so much more responsive I have never been happier about a decision except when I decided to run a Linux desktop and put Windows in a VM sandbox on that third monitor where it belongs.

Justin James
Justin James

The incentive for you is that you'd be able to hit Windows 8 tablets running ARM *and* Windows 8 apps on a x86/x64 laptop or desktop with the same binary package. Windows 8 is a potentially big seller on tablets because enterprises will like the management story (which is actually quite good), and consumers *may* accept them as well. Windows 8 is the tablet OS that enterprises have been clamoring for, thanks to Active Directory integration/control. J.Ja

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