Windows 8

Poll: Will you write Web, legacy, or Metro apps for Windows 8?

Answer this poll question to let us know if you're going to develop Web, legacy, or Metro applications for Windows 8.

The developer preview of Windows 8 has a lot of developers starting to think ahead about what kinds of applications they will be writing. While Web apps are more work to write than desktop apps for certain functions, they are cross-platform and look good on Windows 8. Traditional apps (now considered legacy), at this time, are a poor experience but are backwards compatible. The new Metro apps look slick, but it is difficult to do sophisticated UIs with them, and they lack backwards compatibility.

Right now, I think developers should seriously consider abandoning the desktop model in favor of Web apps if they can, but I know that not everyone can do that.

J.Ja

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

16 comments
beauty11
beauty11

I recently decided to make a big push into mastering those three.nike lebren 8 low It seems the best investment in my time

David Stratton
David Stratton

Seriously, each is a tool that is appropriate for specific tasks (and some can be used for multiple.) You can use a butter knife to cut bread, spread butter, and screw in a screw. However, a screwdriver is better for the last task, and a sharp, serrated bread knife is better for the first. The same can be said about the difference between Metro apps, legacy apps, and web apps. Each has strengths. Seriously, since all can be done in .NET (assuming Legacy apps includes .NET Winforms apps), and all are relatively similar under the hood, why would anybody limit themselves to just one?

adimauro
adimauro

Things are changing too fast in programming, but regardless of the platform or programming language, there is one constant that all of them share: HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript. For the foreseeable future, that seems to be the best way to ensure a stable future career. Java, C#, Ruby, Python, etc., etc. The Web frameworks all rely on HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript...not to mention that those three skills are transferable to whatever back end technology you are using. So, I recently decided to make a big push into mastering those three. It seems the best investment in my time.

JamesRL
JamesRL

Of course that isn't a change from the last number of years. We have a legacy backend, and web layer on top. Our software runs on Linux servers. It is tested and certified with IE and relies on some standard components. But some creative types have managed to make it work with even Mac clients. It just isn't supported.As time goes on we have tried to reduce dependancies and eliminate client side needs. I will add that we do have a mobile app that runs on smartphones, but not with full functionality.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Might even be built into .net that you can easily with the flip of a switch, change your interface between legacy and metro.

apotheon
apotheon

MS Windows development is such a miserable experience in general that I find it difficult to believe people are resistant to Web development when they contemplate writing code for that platform.

mattohare
mattohare

Should be tick boxes. I'm always doing all of them.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Depends on what sort of app is required doesn't it. Choice of interface is much more likely to constrain requirements than enable them. It's this sort of thinking that got us into the client side executable versus RIA drivel. Even if there was a real desire for a metro interface and it was suitable, we've still got to support older versions of windows, so any Metro stuff would have to be an optional extra for 8ers. Well we'd like to sell you our software but first you are going to have to upgrade your entire infrastructure is going to make us look like clueless propeller heads or Gartner types isn't it... No suitable voting option, so didn't...

jkameleon
jkameleon

I'm doing in-house development, for internal use only. None of my apps will ever run on touchscreen.

Justin James
Justin James

That's my fault, I should have included it, sorry! It wasn't deliberate, I usually have someone like a "more than one" or "all of the above" for a poll like this one. J.Ja

Justin James
Justin James

Microsoft is essentially signaling to people to abandon native applications for sophisticated work ENTIRELY and to use Metro/WinRT only for things like games, utilitarian apps (not system utilities, since Metro/WinRT is cut off from the system and can't do much useful there), etc. They really want things like IDEs, Photoshop, etc. to be the only "legacy" applications left, and even those I could see phased out soon. My article next week discusses this in depth, let's just say that I feel that Microsoft currently believes that the desktop will, and should get very "thin" very quickly, which surprisingly puts you and Microsoft in agreement. :) J.Ja

Slayer_
Slayer_

I know it has gotten better, but the bad taste stays. It's mostly IE's fault.

mattohare
mattohare

They should be a choice for these surveys.

apotheon
apotheon

I don't disagree with Microsoft just to disagree with Microsoft, of course. My reasons for habitual disagreement with Microsoft are based on its track record of stubborn adherence to bad ideas. Of course, you're probably already aware that's how I think of the situation. Of course, I'm not sure Microsoft is pushing in that direction for the same reasons I would prefer taking things in that direction if I had to write a bunch of software for MS Windows (and, in fact, I might end up doing just that in the near future, though the circumstances will not be conducive to using a Web interface -- I'll have to write the code in C and C++).

apotheon
apotheon

It's difficult to argue with fact.