IT Employment

Poll: Would you quit a job over the use of certain development technologies?

Some developers might think it's ludicrous, especially in this economy, to resign because you don't like the technologies used at work. Some would disagree. Where do you stand?

I know developers who absolutely hated the technologies that they had to use in their jobs, and I even have known a few who switched jobs for this reason. While I am fairly frustrated with some of the technologies I have to use on a daily basis, I don't think I would leave my job because of it. However, I can definitely understand those who do quit; after all, if your job is that frustrating because of poor technology, there really is not much you can do to enjoy your job, is there?

J.Ja

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About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

6 comments
hilikus_666
hilikus_666

Well everything can be learned, with good practice, nice pick-up, with P A T I E N C E and better understanding of what you're doing, you can do almost everything. Enjoy life - make it easier for you. If you can't, then find another way for you to enjoy it . . :)

urkiddinme
urkiddinme

Company uses PowerBuilder and absolutely hate it. It's a piece of work.

RMSx32767
RMSx32767

I suppose the first task is to agree on the definition of "really bad". It's been said ad nauseam that real programmers don't use ... I had a boss years ago who believed VisualBasic was the best tool for programming. In the course of my career I've seen only one language I truly disliked, and I am sure that was due to my first exposure to it being very poorly written code.

rhonin
rhonin

Just bad I could likely find a way to work-around and live with... at least till I found something better. However, if it is a combination of bad tools / tech and unrealistic expectations by management I would be gone yesterday. Not worth the stress to stay.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

I'd be on the job market without a second thought. Would quite 'til I had another one lined up mind...

Mark Miller
Mark Miller

The main reason I've left IT jobs is due to management problems, but in the background technology has been a reason I was glad to leave them. You might be thinking of this in a different sense. I look at it from a language/API standpoint, not the IDE. As long as you have a command-line compiler and debugger available, you can always get away from a bad IDE. You have to work harder at what you do, but you have more control over the environment. This won't apply to most developers, or even many development situations, but it's possible to design your way out of a bad situation, and this goes back to my motto of, "It's a matter of how you use technology, not the technology itself." It's more a matter of time than technology. Do you have the time to improve the design of what you are working with? In a lot of situations you don't, or even if you do, the people who come after you may not understand it. I've told you this story before. I was working on an ASP.Net app. for a customer several years ago. I was using VS.Net's design tools to create what for ASP.Net was a complex web page, and I painted myself into a corner. I got the job done, but it was a total mess internally. I realized later that I could've made the design more sane if I had avoided VS.Net's design tools and created my own class framework to abstract away some of the complexity. I had a chance to do that for a different page in the same app., and I was a lot happier with the outcome. However, I realized there was a reason .Net developers liked programmable code generators. The design made a lot more sense, but the code got very repetitive, and I had to do it all by hand (unless I wanted to use my own money for a code generator, which I didn't). I didn't have time to create my own generator. Just typing out the code (along with copy and paste), while boring, was faster.