Apps

Stop complaining and start coding

App developer Steve Dryall thinks technology pros should use their expertise to make solutions rather than complain about changes.

One thing I've noticed about people who work in technology is that we're never short on opinions. Whenever I feel my area of expertise covers a topic of discussion, I express my position. But when does a technology expert stop offering opinions and start creating solutions?

As app developers, we have the chance to influence people's lives by helping them use their computing devices to the fullest potential -- this transforms us from problem creators to problem solvers. If you can create technology that solves problems, then you have every right to complain about the problem you solved. Actions speak louder than words and, in the case of app development, those words are usually code.

Three steps you can take

Create a new model

As technologies have progressed, so have the business models that make that technology work. The "freemium" business model is one that has solidified its existence with many thanks to apps. Banner advertising and other forms of embedded ads have become standard practice thanks to the Internet. New technologies and new models can create widespread change if they work. If you can create a new model for technology to function, you can implement change.

Create a new platform

The task of creating a new platform can be overwhelming, but it can be simplified and broken down into manageable parts. You do not have to create hardware, an OS, and an ecosystem to create a platform; if you create a system that enables people and that system becomes adopted, you have a platform. Many successful technology companies were built on creating a platform for users.

Create a new channel

There are many places online where people can share their views, but there are still opportunities to discover and explore new channels or sub-categories of niches that already exist.

Conclusion

Voicing about what does not work without providing a solution is merely complaining. I think IT pros, and especially app developers, should use their abilities to propose solutions to technology problems.

About

Steve is an independent technology and content developer. His experience spans decades and covers areas including rich-media production, software development, and education. Steve has contributed to the digital realm in many ways and has no plans on ...

10 comments
welshdragon123
welshdragon123

I agree that coding could save a lot of headaches but 1 doesn't always have time to be coding, which can sometimes be more of a headache

jkameleon
jkameleon

Coding is for skinny folks from NOSOTEK.

Alpha_Dog
Alpha_Dog

Tony has a point, but then again not every company expects miracles with sub-par tools. Our company welcomes innovation and helps innovators get patents or market their project where this is appropriate. What we don't tolerate is whingeing about an issue without coming up with an alternative. You don't have to code it and commit a 1.0 release; just a concept or napkin drawing will suffice. If we don't engage the company in the solution, we will at least allow you to work on fixing something that bugs you, partially on company time, partially on your own. Depending on how much personal time was committed and how useful the end project is to the company, we will either: 1) Compensate you and your team for your effort, buying the project outright. We then bring the project into our own offerings or make a subsidiary out of it. 2) Help you through protecting the intellectual property issues with the company owning only the percentage of the project which was done during company time (historically 10-50%). 3) Lay you and your team off and help you spin off your own business to offer your product or service to the world, with our company usually being your first customer. We have several expressions around here that sum up our culture. "GOYA" (Acronym for "Get off your a$$") "Tell me what will work instead of what won't." "We are about solutions, not problems." ...and my personal favorite, the ten shortest words of greatest power: "If it is to be, it is up to me." My point is that corporate culture determines how effectively one is allowed or expected to solve issues. Either way, complaining accomplishes little other than defining the problem. Defining the problem is only the first step in finding and implementing a solution. As with everything else, follow through is everything.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

but then my employer said what we had was good enough.. You might want to get out more. :(

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

"If you can create technology that solves problems, then you have every right to complain about the problem you solved." Why complain about something from which you benefited?

seanferd
seanferd

I see what you did there. :^0

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

I couldn't always do what was needed but I could always get closer. Writing commercial software for sale, opportunities do not abound. Not to mention that there are far more problems that can't be solved by coding than can, and of those that are, a horrifying number shouldn't have been...

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

He wants you to hang out at work, after work, and fix problems you're not getting paid to work on... you know, for shilts and giggles.

Alpha_Dog
Alpha_Dog

We cannot instantly transport an object to its destination, and we can't instantly solve all problems or effect drastic change. The concept of mass and inertia apply to organizations as well. While we can't change things instantly, we can move closer by steps, actions, resolutions, projects and influence. As far as solving issues with pure code, I was always taught that a program is a series of instructions for an adaptable tool. As such, the tool must already be present as well as the process already in place. Software just tweaks and optimizes things to work as good as possible and adapt to changing environments and needs.