Windows Phone

What development tech do you want to learn in 2011?

Do you plan to learn Ruby, mobile development, Silverlight/WPF, HTML 5, Java 7, or some other technology this year? Take the poll and share your feedback in the discussion.

The world of development is always changing, and you either keep up or get out, for the most part. In 2011, there are a number of technologies that are not quite "must have" skills, but being proficient in them could make a big difference when you want to stand out from the pack and not.

In no particular order, I think that developers who learn Ruby, mobile development, Silverlight/WPF, HTML 5, and Java 7 (I know, some of these are not finalized yet) will be setting themselves up quite nicely for long-term career growth quite nicely. For me, I'm learning more about mobile development as well as Silverlight since I'm doing Windows Phone 7 work.

Which of these technologies would you learn if you had the chance? If you're interested in learning a development technology that I didn't list, tell us what it is in the discussion.

J.Ja

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

12 comments
cyborgdom
cyborgdom

Some big-wigs are now using mobile computing devices but most of my clients have not even heard of it talk less of getting one, thus I will love to prepare myself for the forth-coming periods when my clients will also join the world of mobile computing even thou I may be the one to introduce them to the mobile environment.

jck
jck

Whatever my boss wants. I'm actually still trying to relocate, and I've got 2 jobs considering me. I'll program whatever they give me, and do it for another 15 years or so. Then, I'll retire. I've had enough with office life and programming. Plans for retirement: garden, go fishing, and watch BBC programs.

neilb
neilb

The BBC will have sunk to the level of every other channel. still, there will always be re-runs of Top Gear and Fawlty Towers! :) How's it going? You seem fairly cheerful. (Note the use of a little Brit irony)

aminasecurity
aminasecurity

i want to learn more about backing up servers using windows backup. i would also wish to interact with security personell (systems administrator security)thats an area where i want to specialise but have failed on how to implement thanks

jbgisser
jbgisser

I'm actually new to PHP, but our company is going down this path.

bmateus
bmateus

But I'm learning the new Drupal 7 cms - and it's much greater than I've ever imagined. Starting to build modules for it in php.

RTPritch
RTPritch

I support an enterprise line-of-business app. using ASP.NET web forms. I also support web services written in Java. t seems to me learning about mobile is the way to go, since I see the day where some of these platforms will merge and mobile-based interfaces will be a large part of that.

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden like.author.displayName 1 Like

I have yet to get my feet wet in this space, mostly because none of my clients are ready to reach out for it yet. I'll need to do that before they come to me saying that they need it now.

Realvdude
Realvdude

This is more of a research process at this point, but I'm sure that learning will follow.

apotheon
apotheon

In order from most to least wanted, my top 5 are: 1. More Ruby 2. Systems Programming in C 3. Mobile Platform Application Development 4. Mobile Platform Embedded Development 5. Useful Functional Programming (Common Lisp, Haskell, or OCaml) Should I select Ruby in the survey, even though I already know the language? It might be worthwhile to learn Java to a level of functional competency (my familiarity is somewhat less than competent in that regard), if only to figure out how to translate some open source Java software into other languages so that I can contribute some small amount to the commencement of the abandonment of the Java ecosystem.

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

I have no doubt that you'd be able to learn Java the language to competency in very short order. Becoming familiar with each of the libraries is another matter. When converting Java to a better language, the art of cutting through all the useless scaffolding without throwing out something essential can be a challenge.

apotheon
apotheon

That's really where the major difficulty lies. I already know the basic syntax (it's not exactly revolutionary), enough to be able to kinda-sorta get by. Its the semantic weight of libraries that is the real stumbling block. . . . and, of course, just the horribleness of Java "best practice".