Software Development optimize

Why Oracle bought Sun: 60% of enterprise software vendors rely on Java

AMR Research indicates that more than 60 percent of the top 50 enterprise software vendors have applications that rely on Java. Larry Dignan asks: Anyone out there still think Oracle's acquisition of Sun was about hardware?

This is a guest post from Larry Dignan of TechRepublic’s sister site ZDNet. You can follow Larry on his ZDNet blog Between the Lines, or subscribe to the RSS feed.

AMR Research has recapped its annual ranking of the top 50 enterprise software vendors, but the real story may be in its findings that more than 60 percent of the top dogs have applications that rely on Java.

And of the top 50 enterprise software vendors 33 offer applications that rely on Java. Add it up and this group represents more than $38.5 billion, or 77 percent of the top 50's revenue.

Anyone out there still think Oracle's acquisition of Sun was about hardware?

Simply put, Oracle through Java has its hand in most of the enterprise application market. AMR reckons that these Java-reliant vendors will have to reevaluate their commitment to Java. That's putting it mildly.

Here's a look at the top 50 enterprise application vendors by revenue.

Also see: Can Oracle give Java a boost (and monetize it better)?
4 comments
Saurondor
Saurondor

You should also consider that MySQL and Open Office are under the Sun umbrella. I don't know how well Oracle's products can be embedded, but MySQL and a lot of Java driven databases sure can. That positions Oracle to target mobile solutions with enterprise level solutions.

Justin James
Justin James

Everyone talks about how Java fits into this, but I think that MySQL might be a bigger deal. Sun never made a dime on Java, and the Java was doing their own thing without Sun's involvement anyways. Java has reached a critical mass where Sun is no longer needed. But MySQL is another matter entirely. For non-Windows shops, the DB market is Oracle or MySQL, for the most part. On Windows, SQL Server comes into play as well. By getting their hands on MySQL, Oracle now has a commandeering lead in DB deployments. That's always been their bread and butter. Watch them do to MySQL what Cisco did to Linksys: slowly switch things so that MySQL is thought of as "Oracle light" by enterprise consumers (regardless of what tech is actually under the hood) and a lot of shops that were previously choosing between Oracle and SQL Server will suddenly now consider MySQL to be a possibility too. Just like I now have Linksys branded switches in my server rack. :) J.Ja

csmith.kaze
csmith.kaze

As long as the OSE MySQL isn't made closed source, I am cool with whatever they do. I am not very up-to-date on Oracle's FLOSS strategy, but if they accept it and embrace it the way Sun did with Java, OpenOffice, MySQL, and VirtualBox, I think that more and more FLOSS pundits will look more kindly on Oracle. As far as I know, the FLOSS world is still holding its breath over the fate of the Sun OSE projects. You know, noone has said anything about where VirtualBox is going in this deal. Has Oracle said anything?

Saurondor
Saurondor

Yup, I agree with you. We can all see who's getting squished in the middle between the high priced Oracle products and the free MySQL.