Tablets

Does the decline in PC sales indicate tablet dominance?

Tablets and mobile devices are a major force behind the decline in PC sales, but is the PC dead, and are tablets truly the heir apparent for desktops and laptops?

The big news this week was the IDC study that PC sales experienced a nearly 14% year-over-year drop, the largest decline since the company began tracking the metric. It's fairly obvious that tablets and mobile devices are a major force behind the decline, but is the PC dead, and are tablets truly the heir apparent for desktops and laptops?

The PC and the curse of "good enough"

Not surprisingly, I was a bit of a geek as a teenager, and I remember lusting after the latest and greatest processor announcements from Intel, planning how many lawns I would need to mow to garner another dozen mHz in speed and leap from one processor generation to the next. Each new generation of processors was notably faster than the last, and even the uninitiated could see the difference in speed between, say, a 286 and 386 processor.

We've now entered an era where processor speed is largely irrelevant for most general productivity applications. I can't tell the difference between using Microsoft Office on the latest Core i7 processor and a three-year-old mobile chip, assuming a similar storage system. While games and video rendering get a massive and noticeable bump on the newer machine, these are tasks I rarely perform. For consumers and enterprises alike, the three- or four-year-old PC or Mac functions just as well as the latest and greatest when the majority of computing tasks are shuffling emails, typing documents, and jockeying spreadsheets. Even my four-year-old netbook, with an Intel Atom processor that's often chided as being "underpowered," competently runs Windows 7 and the latest Office suite.

The app invasion

Much of the talk of apps has become a bit tedious, but interestingly, mobile apps have replaced many of the tasks once performed on a traditional computer. There are a ton of banking and personal finance apps, and always-available email trumps any productivity lost to smaller keys. Even gaming has largely moved away from the PC. My mother-in-law is the stereotypical "casual gamer" and used to enjoy all manner of card and puzzle games on her laptop. With an iPad now at her disposal, the PC sits on a table gathering dust.

The Windows 8 gamble

One of the most shocking aspects of the recent decline in PC sales was that it coincided with a major OS release from Microsoft. In years past, an OS upgrade prompted brisk PC sales as consumers and enterprises alike timed their hardware updates to Redmond's latest and greatest. The IDC numbers seem to indicate Windows 8 is missing expectations, but I see a deeper problem.

Just as recent hardware has been "good enough" for many users, Windows 7 is hitting the same mark on the OS front. Many would even make that argument about Windows XP, but the decade-plus old OS was definitely showing its age. Just as the hardware and software hit the mark of "good enough," Microsoft made a major shift in how its software worked.

Show an XP user Windows 7, and they'll likely feel right at home. With Windows 8, many users are initially confused. Combine this with a machine that's already "good enough," and there's little reason to invest in a new machine running Windows 8. Where I see Microsoft missing the mark is on pitching Windows 8 as a unifying experience among tablet, desktop, and phone, rather than a very different looking OS with poorly articulated benefits that fail to lift it over the "good enough" hurdle.

What's next?

I believe the concept of the PC as the center of one's computing experience is dead. Companies that continue to regard tablets and smartphones as disconnected, peripheral devices do so at their own peril and face a similar threat. The PC-style device, however, may have some life left. If Microsoft, Apple, or the open source movement could produce a highly connected device that integrates deeply with our mobile devices, they may have a winner on their hands. Despite the current love of all things touch, there's still plenty of room for large screens and keyboards, especially in the enterprise.

Do you agree or disagree? Share your thoughts in the discussion thread below.

About

Patrick Gray works for a global Fortune 500 consulting and IT services company and is the author of Breakthrough IT: Supercharging Organizational Value through Technology as well as the companion e-book The Breakthrough CIO's Companion. He has spent ...

156 comments
aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

One common complaint with previous MS releases is that people are forced to use Windows Media Player, Camera, Music, Video by default. Windows 8N comes stripped of those features and allows users to choose, VLC player, Fireworks, etc as they choose for all their media choices.

cpetit
cpetit

People like myself who have a nicely functioning Windows 7 PC which meets their gaming and productivity needs aren't likely to shell out the extra cash. It used to be, back even 10 years ago, PC upgrades provided significant increases in performance and storage. So it was worthwhile to upgrade. Now, it really is a case of diminishing returns. While a Core i7 processor does provide some performance improvement over my Core Duo, it's not enough for me to justify the upgrade. Also, if my PC completely died (which is unlikely), I'd replace the motherboard rather than buying a new Windows 8 PC. That ties into the "not a Windows 8 fan" part as well. I've tried Windows 8 in its pre-release mode and wasn't impressed. It felt like a tablet GUI slapped on top of the Windows 7 desktop, rather than like an integrated OS. And, I agree that many casual PC users just want to browse the web and play some simple games. These people can use a tablet and apps to fill their needs, especially when there are a fairly good number of free apps available. Certainly, if they already have a basic PC, they aren't going to upgrade it to a beefier one. They'll probably buy a tablet and use it instead.

maginleym
maginleym

Thanks everyone for such great analysis. So far what I've gleaned is that PCs and laptops are powerful and can be upgraded. Marketplace factors, and consumer behaviors, override what manufacturers want to force on the marketplace. I see tablets as able to capitalize on the growth of media content and the speed of distribution. According to Business Insider: The average selling price of tablets will continue to fall. Tablets benefit from increased penetration in existing markets. They are a disruptive technology. Growth opportunities exist in enterprise, education, and emerging markets. I still need a PC or a laptop because I have to create content as part of the work that I do.

Regulus
Regulus

For an intensive IT household / small business, tablets & smartphones may dominate in acquisitions - especially since they are all still in adolescent stages of development and evolution. They require frequent hardware updating to keep up. But, who is the General keeping all of these items together? It's that 'lonely' pc over there in the corner, maintaining the modem, router, access in / out, data in / out, updating systems and basic 'health' issues. Do you really think for one minute that you're going to run 100% of your contact with the 'World' through that smartphone or Ipad? The PC is the Boss / Gatekeeper for all of the rest of it.

esivertsen
esivertsen

I am responding to your statement: "I believe the concept of the PC as the center of one’s computing experience is dead." The way that I look at the PC/laptops (now and probably in the near future) are devices that "create content" while tablets, smartphones "consume content". There are still many, many things that you can't do with a tablet that can still do with a PC/laptop.

HypnoToad72
HypnoToad72

a real dock with real keyboard - not more battery-suckin' wasteful wiifi small portable keyboard garbage... I wonder how much quickly/worse landfills will be filled up by this stuff since we're becoming more disposable as a society - in terms of products and people... ... and real monitor connection and writing code on a tablet becomes possible. I loathe typing on tablets because they is no tactile response, the layout is too cramped, and back and neck problems crop up. And as companies demand one brand of device as opposed to another, BYOD will become a big mess... and workers get to pay for it all. Yay.

HypnoToad72
HypnoToad72

a real dock with real keyboard - not more battery-suckin' wasteful wiifi small portable keyboard garbage... I wonder how much quickly/worse landfills will be filled up by this stuff since we're becoming more disposable as a society - in terms of products and people...

bart.denturck
bart.denturck

Personally, at home I find that all that we need to do on the web (and that is most of what we do with a computing device these days anyway) can be done just as well on our iPad, no need to replace our old PC. On the job it's a different matter, I want a decent screen and the comfort of a keyboard and an ergonomic mouse but there I agree with what most of the readers write here, my 4 year old Dell laptop does the job and I don't want to go through all the hassle to replace it. Most of my office colleagues think the same way...

sarai1313
sarai1313

Product saturation and the world wide economy. Do any of think that is what it is? Or it could be just product saturation like what happen in 2000 when all at once you could get a compleat system for around 500 dollars?

scottz
scottz

How much do you wanna bet, you typed this article on your PC and not your smart phone or tablet. Exactly my point.

mjd420nova
mjd420nova

Too often many will condemn a platform without trying it. I have to admit many thought WIN8 was more than the users were ready for. Then some were exposed to a tablet with the WIN8 OS. The platform makes a lot more sense to a USER on a touch screen tablet, and it feels a bit like an overly large phone. The foresight of M$ to figure the next advancements and prepare for them or even influence them instead of the third party rushing to catch up. Drivers have and always will be a downfall with so many different mfgrs jumping in with last minute bells and whistles that aren't supported across the board.

1949jorgensen
1949jorgensen

Robynsveil spoke of users experience with Win 8 which u cannot discount. Robynsveil was also talking about Microsoft's Swiss Cheese. I also agree with Robynsveil on that, as Microsoft seems to like to engage users, as Beta Testers instead of the product being fully equipped from the start. It's like buying a new car, then the dealer calls you and says: "You need to bring it back to get your spare tire, etc."

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

With newer OS's running well on older boxes, of course PC sales will diminish, following a release where PC upgrades were almost imperative to run it (XP and Vista). Too bad you didn't give Win8 a chance though, you can get rid of that whole desktop look you didn't like and run it normally instead. Win8 is pretty quick, from my testing (I don't own a copy) and runs really nicely when cut down too.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

I've designed smart homes where a proprietary system manages all wireless devices, access points etc throughout a home and without a PC backbone. Users can either surf the web or text from their mobile devices or turn the heat up, set lighting moods, control the home theatre, open the blinds, arm and disarm the alarm etc. A whole home automation system can be designed to be controlled from wall mounted keypads or mobile devices without a PC to run the back end.

andrew232006
andrew232006

You'd have a less powerful, more expensive PC that you can't upgrade.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Its simple really. Win7 and Win8 run on older PC's pretty well so thee's no need for a new box and sales of new PC's are down. When XP was out, everyone was pretty much forced to buy new hardware or for Vista if they skipped earlier upgrades. Now people just buy Win7 or 8 and throw it in their existing PC, thus sales decline. Also, where many sales figures are reported as revenue dollars, computers drop in price by 20% for entry level machine and thus gross revenue drops accordingly. All this BS about people switching to Linux or MAC is just a farce, MS would be freaking out and pulling all the stops if that was a reality.

Slayer_
Slayer_

And there are those transforming tablets, including the new Surface from MS. And you can plug a keyboard into both Android and Apple tablets and phones for serious typing.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Which is where people don't like it.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

If Apple did it, it would be the greatest forward move ever made and everyone else would be deemed a copycat, whether they had it first or not. When MS does it, they are jumping the gun, forcing change, pushing people to Linux etc. lemmings, just lemmings, happily jumping off the cliff one by one.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Since the early 80's. When major style changes take effect, a new look for example, AVOID IT LIKE THE PLAGUE!! Early adopters of new styling changes are the Beta testers of the car market. My boss just traded in his POS Porsche Cayenne for a BMW3 hybrid. It gets horrible mileage, the starter has dies twice because they haven't figures out how to make a Bendix drive engage repeatedly all day without burning out and every other little glitch you can think of. In 4 or 5 years it will be refined and worth buying, but then they will have a new styling change and do it all over again, JUST LIKE A PC! It's the same story, when people understand PC's and not cars, it's easy to see one products flaws and not another's, but it's all the same story. Early adopters always lose.

Slayer_
Slayer_

More like, come back to us when the engine explodes, we will diagnose it and charge you for a new one.

cpetit
cpetit

I've heard rumors Windows 8 will have a "Blue" release which puts the tablet UI in the background and runs the Windows 7 desktop by default. If so, it might be worth trying then.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

take over due to the very low end security of not having a safe gateway.

Robynsveil
Robynsveil

"Our most potent Operating System competitor is Linux and the phenomena around Open Source and free software. The same phenomena fuels competitors to all of our products. The ease of picking up Linux to learn it or to modify some piece of it is very attractive. The academic community, start up companies, foreign governments and many other constituencies are putting their best work into Linux." Bill Gates Just a farce, hey? Bill doesn't appear to get the humour of that, does he?

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

I'm sure that tweak tools, like the recent release of Yamicasoft's Win8 manager, will have a quick check box to enable classic desktop and disable the app view. It's only a single registry value change, a 30 second tweak, but someone will put it in their tweaking software soon I'm sure. I've seen the change myself and you end up with a normal looking OS that goes like a whip.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

You can completely shut off the app desktop look of Win8 and use a more classic start menu if you wish, just as you can with Win7, I suppose it's more of a convertible solution where people are used to what comes out of the box is what is on YOUR box too, but it's not really that way. Windows8 is also a relatively inexpensive upgrade, perhaps due to making it accessible to a broader range of applications. As for people not liking it, it wouldn't matter what they released, what it did, how it looked and felt, etc. People will always bitch and moan about anything different, it's the pathetic nature of our modern, complacent society.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Just like Windows 8. I wonder how well those starters work at minus 40. Can you even leave the engine to idle and warm up?

Slayer_
Slayer_

We just have to wait.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Actually I saw a report this morning that Blue is going to be released soon and will be called Windows 8.1 with no other details. At the very least that seems a bit rushed, so even if Microsoft sticks to there stated Development Cycle of a Service Pack at the 2 year mark and a new OS at the 4 year mark it's way too early for anything yet. Seems that the Heads of Microsoft feel that they have to introduce this [b]NOW[/b] so maybe depending on what Blue actually is this may show them listening to the Media and what they are demanding. Personally I thought it silly forcing the same UI on Tablets and Desktops but then again I could understand the reason as it was a way of speeding up the acceptance of 8 in the Enterprise with a lot of the End Users using the same thing on their Mobile Phones and Tablets/Slates. Long term it may even be right but it has certainly caused lots of comments Short Term. Col

Slayer_
Slayer_

I feel so old... I'd still rather be using Windows 95...

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

We had those comments and I posted MS's HCL comments several times. Where they stated quite clearly that, in order to utilize the additional Vista features, greater hardware requirements applied and that minimal requirements would not permit the use of Aero and a few other features. They even explained that the minimum hardware requirements would not allow such features to be used but you would still benefit from the greatly increase security found in Vista. The idea was clearly that if you current';y run and old XP box and wanted to escape teh security nightmare of XP, that you could get Vista to run in a basic mode but gain the added security. It was all very clear and concise if people actually took some time to read things for once instead of parroting someone else's misguided BS. Again though, if there isn't a big, red flashing sign, it's nobody's fault if they don't see it, except the software vendor. People are getting so stupid these days it makes me sick to think of how clueless mankind's future will be. Living in protective bubbles while the government holds your hand will be the ultimate solution.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

It's very much a [b]Monkey See Monkey Do[/b] system. One person comes out with something and everyone else has to repeat it to sound authoritative in their own minds at least. Aero originally was panned because it didn't work with all Video Chip Sets and needed a High End Video Chip Set to work. That required more expensive hardware than the Basic List originally provided by Microsoft so it must be a Bad Thing. When actually the real problem was that the Hardware List was so far below what was required to run Vista Properly and was all Microsoft's fault. So what was the real problem was that Microsoft relented and allowed the Hardware Makers like HP Dell and so on to push them into recommending Lower Hardware Requirements and then while Vista Worked, it didn't work as some people expected so it was no good. But when everything is said and done any OS is just there to Run Software and if it does then it's Good Enough and if it doesn't then it's Useless. Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

It is the Development Name for the next generation of Windows so it would be called Windows 9 if the current naming convention is continued. What you may have heard is a Journalist asking for Blue to be released as a Service Pack for 8 but at the moment it's still the Development Name for the next version of Windows. Col

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

I haven't put much personal interest into Win8, it's just an OS to me, which used to seem important but I don't care anymore, as long as i can figure out how to use an OS for my day to day then I don't care who's it is anymore. I've done the reversion trick with Win8, not Blue, and it looks and feels just like any other Windows desktop, without it being an integrated feature. Just like people all complaining about Aero desktop with Vista, it was so easily disabled too. They just read on line that people didn't like Vista's Aero and then every time there was a Vista discussion ANYWHERE, they;d be in there saying it sucked because of Aero. As far as listening to people's opinions about an OS or any other piece of software or hardware, I don't pay any attention to what people spew, as 99.999% of it is absolute BS they read somewhere and want to sound 'in the know' about. The more opinions I read, the more I like dogs more than people. I wouldn't DREAM of kicking a dog, but I'd kick every other person I met without hesitation.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

the many consumer level devices built into home use appliances, then when it's pointed out how lacking in protective capability they individually are, you suddenly change them to being PC or server standard hardware with built in gateways. Anyway, it doesn't really mater much as where you're at now is agreeing with me that the only true protection is with the higher end PC / server standard computers and not the low end consumer level stuff used for the embedded systems. It matters not what you wish to call it, if it's got a PC or server level CPU and capabilities it's still a PC level device and a far cry from the dinky low end consumer level tablets that are ebing sold with next to no protection at all.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

You Actually said "and with each on the Internet to allow that, they are all open to take over due to the very low end security of not having a safe gateway." At what point did I mention that there was no gateway or that these are low end consumer level appliances? I have sold automation solutions from 4 or 5 different manufacturers and all have a proprietary gateways, that doesn't require a PC back end though. Your comment: "and with each on the Internet to allow that, they are all open to take over due to the very low end security of not having a safe gateway." I didn't realize that you has such extensive knowledge of the proprietary controllers and security solutions that are used in home automation systems. Of course with ANY consumer focused Internet connection, there is some possibility or being hacked. Whether a WiFi signal, hardwired etc. They rely on the ISP's back end for most security and your own homes WiFi configuration for further security. This is absolutely NO different with a home automation system as it uses your existing Internet provider's system and connection on the home owners side of their router to keep signal secure. Security has nothing to do with the automation system, if your connection is insecure, it's insecure, home automation or not. I can only imagine the horrors of a hacker working his way into your system and turning on the lights, cranking the heat or playing music. The alarm system and automatic locks are a bit trickier to work around though as control from the system must be from a hardwired point.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

Two days ago you said - - "I've designed smart homes where a proprietary system manages all wireless devices, access points etc throughout a home and without a PC backbone." "Users can either surf the web or text from their mobile devices or turn the heat up, set lighting moods, control the home theatre, open the blinds, arm and disarm the alarm etc. A whole home automation system can be designed to be controlled from wall mounted keypads or mobile devices without a PC to run the back end. " ............... To which I replied they were open to attack and had no security as most are consumer level devices out there to work in a 'smart home' that are capable of connecting to the Internet direct with minimalistic computing capability and no real protection from hacking etc. ............ You replied - - "Gateways are inherent in the systems to. The backbone of an automation system is a hub/server that is a rack appliance. It can be logged into and programmed, gateways and firewall etc." ........... With the mention of a rack mounted hub server appliances that included gateways and firewalls I naturally assumed you were now talking about rack mounted computer equipment - - a natural assumption for an IT forum. Also, I've seen many rack mounted appliances that work as gateways, and all were built round a proper PC, just stuck in a rack format box. Thus there is a gatewy built on a decent CPU and RAM isntead of just the low end consumer minimalistic processor connected to a wi-fi like you get in a 'smart' toaster or fridge or TV or media system. Thus proving the point I was making that you need a PC level device to provide the protection and manage everything or risk it all being hijacked by any hacker. It matter not if it's in a rack box, a tower box, or a desktop box, when you have a PC standard or server standard level CPU and RAM with a suitable quality OS to run the management and the gateway, it's protected and corodinated with a PC. I'm sure it's spossible to set up a smart home with everything individually connected to the Internet and all you need is a wi-fi point for them, but you won't get much security or safety that way. ................... There probably is no global standard for the individual things yet, but relying on an item to be managed through a controller some where else out in the cloud just means it has a wid eopen vulnerability to attack via the cloud or the wireless if that's used within the facility. Regardless of how it goes or is set, you won't get any real security without having some PC level, or higher, computing hardware in the mix at some point, regardless of what you care to call it.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

I simply told you what I actually have done, I don't claim to, I did. I haven't CREATED a smart home, the builder made the home, the automation products can either be wholly proprietary or be universal systems that allow integration with existing equipment. Rack mounted appliances don't necessarily have ANYTHING AT ALL to do with PC's. Rack mounted audio was around for decades before Gates or Jobs were even born. Rack mounted controllers for home automation usually have a 'nix backbone for programming features. The same piece of hardware may also include a 16 channel audio amplifier for multiroom audio, controllers for lighting and alarm interface etc. Combining many products that are either proprietary or interfaced by serial port (yes, serial port). There are literally dozens of solutions available, each proprietary to the manufactrurer. In some cases, the system actually ports into a global server network, which provides the network security but that is pretty rare. In others it creates it's own hotspots, repeaters, local access points etc. all proprietary hardware and programming which requires a dealer to configure. In others it simply integrates existing network, alarm, audio and lighting. There is no de facto standard and I have yet to see one that runs a Windows server or runs through a PC interface. In the vast majority, an extended service contract is needed in order to have it configured by the provider and is completely locked out from user programming. The provider will connect via serial port and configure it just like a business telephone's KSU from the 90's. I don't know why you assume a rack appliance is based on a PC though, rack appliance is simply a form factor. The same hardware can be used without the rack tabs and just stacked in an audio cabinet too.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

now you say you also use rack appliances - the last time I looked at anyr ack applicances they were specialised full blown PCs. Please make up your mind! Are the smat homse designed aorund the consumer computing devices with no full blown PC capable device is sight or are you using a proper PC to coordinate and protect the system? You can have appliances that connect direct to the Internet, or you can set them up to work via a PC style gateway - which is the smart way to do it, and seems to be what you're doing by using a rack appliance based on a PC.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

The backbone of an automation system is a hub/server that is a rack appliance. It can be logged into and programmed, gateways and firewall etc. Though many are actually secured with a Linux based program it is not imperative for all of them. Have you cracked a smart home lately or was it merely a question or speculation on your part?

Robynsveil
Robynsveil

"That's the problem with companies like LInux, as soon as they release something, it's open season for others to watch it."

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

A leader in the software industry will always look to see what others are providing. That's the problem with companies like LInux, as soon as they release something, it's open season for others to watch it. If it has a user base, they can quickly incorporate it into their own product, tweak it due to the cash pumped into development and release it. Of course Microsoft watches Apple and Linux, Apple and Linux watch Microsoft, and each other too This is starting to sound like a grade 9 economics course. Common business practices that reach back to the invention of fire are being proposed as if they indicate weakness or fear of a competitor. Car manufacturer's do it, all electronics manufacturers do it, even candy bar manufacturers do it. In Western Canada last year, orange chocolate was a huge craze. Terry's chocolate oranges have been around for decades. A few years back, manufacturing changed and they were sold at Christmas DIRT CHEAP! What used to be an $8 chocolate orange was around $2.50. So many people got them for Christmas and got a taste for orange chocolate. Next thing you know, Nestles has orange chocolate in their leading bars, Cadbury threw a few orange chocolate bars out, Roundtree etc quickly followed. It was the orange chocolate craze. Seriously though, did Cadbury fear Terry's was going to take over their market share or was Cadbury just looking to add a new flavour where someone else already took the risk of promoting it to the masses? Terry's then tried multiple flavours which didn't take off as well, rasberry etc. Then it was dark chocolate, KitKat, Aero etc all came out with dark chocolate bars. A few years ago was the caramel craze, where everyone started putting caramel into their chocolate bars. Do you really think that the software development business doesn't follow the same market rules as every other product ever sold? Bill Gates is pretty astute, for an old stoner. He's definitely n dummie and if someone looks at a specific feature unique to a competitor, there's nothing to say that Microsoft hadn't already considered it and decided against it. IF someone else does it a few years later and there's market share, then MS will go back to the drawing board and redevelop theirs too.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

many of the changes made to Windows in the last several years are things that Linux tried a few years earlier - a version of Glass 3D becamse part of Vista, different levels of account security, sadnboxing parts of the system - seems Microsoft are watching Linux very carefully.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

You couldn't quote Bush on the current policies of government in the 8 years he was in office.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

A very poetic comment, carefully written for the press and people such as yourself. I wonder if he used GWB's speechwriter or Obama's?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Linux may have looked like a threat in sixteen years ago, but it hasn't developed into one. Bill hasn't had a active role in MS in almost 5 years. Quoting him on the current direction of the company is like quoting George W. Bush on the current policies of the US government.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

Some just don't get it. Most unaware users, aren't savvy enough to have OS preferences either, they will use ME and think it's just fine. As your own case cited, he wanted to remove 8, most likely due to what he was told by someone else, but was scared to have even a tech remove 8. If he didn't want any changes made, why did he drive 1200K? I wonder who scared him into the change. the unsavvy always rely on someone else for those decisions, often it is someone who doesn't know much better but listens to others and takes verbatim what he reads online, from another half baked tech. No different with cars, you know that too.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Sounds like Blue is adding it back though.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I know it worked in the first 'Developer Release', but it was missing from the second beta.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

The Normal End User simply doesn't want to make any changes to their [b]New[/b] computer they expect it to [b]Just Work.[/b] It could be that the Business IT Departments have finally got through to their End Users so that they are too scared to change anything which I find unlikely or what I consider much more likely is that with computers being Appliances these days and the End Users not understanding what it is that they do or how they work many are just too lazy to bother and believe that what the makers supply is what you have to use. Even the guy who drove 1,200 K demanding that I remove 8 was terrified when I started making changes to 8. As he said if that is how whoever the NB Maker wanted the system to operate that is how they would have delivered it. Any changes I made that he saw just couldn't be right. ;) Col

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

No metro, no need for touch, use the old Windows look and feel you've always used. Same start menus, program folders etc. HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer In the right pane, double-click on RPEnabled key and change its value from 1 to 0. You now don't have Metro and have the standard CLASSIC Windows desktop. 2 minutes tops and it all works, looks and feels normal again.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

The problem that I have run into here is that People love their Windows 8 Phones and detest their Windows 8 Desktops/Notebooks. Not because the OS is so bad but because they don't want Metro on their computers. Sure you can load other software and get rid of Metro but Microsoft made a decision a while ago that they would provide Metro or Nothing. Maybe it will push the Hardware Makers into adopting Touch Screens and people will think differently. Maybe Maybe not. I'm not as yet convinced that having a touch screen on a Desktop is a better idea or for that matter on a NB either. All the complaints I hear about 8 are directly connected to Metro and the way that Microsoft made the decision not to have different start menu's for Mobile and desktop devices. I had a guy here who drove 1,200 kms demanding that I load something else to his NB [i]preferably XP[/i] but at the same time he was using his Windows 8 Phone and raving just how good it was. It was hard keeping a straight face while listening to his complaints. :D Col

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

I don't even pay member dues to SAE anymore, engineering is complete rubbish in North America. If you want a GOOD North American car, buy a Ford, GM, Chrysler overseas and bring it back here or buy a North American car with a German engine in it. The way they cut back manufacturing in the US and Canada is laughable, the same car built in Europe lasts a lot longer, with fewer issues and better mileage, while still providing more horse power than US made models.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

I have also worked at a Ford dealership during very cold winters in the BC Interior and at a private shop in Fort St.John where -30 or 40 is a normal winter day. The issue with cold starts is oil gets thick and takes longer to circulate, a block heater removes that problem for you. Idling causes more damage in those cases than driving. Yes belts make noise when cold, usually not enough to hurt the accessory drive bearings though (they aren't oiled through the pump so there's no benefit to warm up either). It makes no difference at all if you drive with a power steering pump cold squeal or warm it up, in fact driving it will warm and seat the belt faster than idling it. If it was 1970 or very early 80's, you would be 100% correct, but since then, it's just not a benefit. One thing peopl edo in Winter that really kills engines fast is that they either start the car and go back inside for 15 minutes or they use a remote starter and then leave 15+ minutes later. That excessive idling when cold just trashes engines a lot faster.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Those conventional Starters where never designed for Hybrid use or at least the way that Hybrids have been developed today. They need to look back to a Joe Lucas Perversion the Dyna Start no moving parts as such is the way that they need to go to for that type of setup. Still the same idea as Opposing Magnetic Fields cause the engine to spin but the difference is one magnet is connected directly to the crankshaft and when the engine is running it's generating power. ;) Maybe I should go back to Car Design with what's happening these days. :^0 Col

Slayer_
Slayer_

When you car can't even shift, or the steering pumps are whining away struggling to turn, you know it's cold. Warming up the car still makes a big difference and is definitely beneficial. To help with my cars, I have a trickle charger hooked up with the block heater to keep the battery from freezing or losing power. Most people don't believe this is necessary but most people don't live in the winter provinces where -30 and -40 for weeks at a time are normal.

aidemzo_adanac
aidemzo_adanac

At idle the engine is off. Idling a car to warm it up is not a good idea these days either, it causes more damage to the car that a start and go as it runs in rich mode and without the rear O2 sensors switching the fronts to manage a stoichiometric fuel mix. It will carbon up valves, burn plugs, wear out catalytic converters faster etc. For minus 40 weather, a $30 block heater is the best solution and you will save more in fuel than idling to warm up every day. In milder climates, there's no need to idle and warm cars anymore, especially with today's fuels. They will warm up faster when driven and don't suffer the same oil pump issues found with older engines. A 10 second warm up should be all you need, engineering has moved beyond the 70's now.